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Definitely an 80's frame and this was the best character of these bikes. Since that manufacture era, gears and brakes, even seats have evolved and you can buy better tech. These frames were steel and they are great commuters (for streets not so friendly). For me the price is directly related to how much stuff I do not need to replace or upgrade. The wheels ...


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With shimano 105 it must be from the 90s. Are gears indexed? I paid 140 € for a similar bike, and the 105 works like charm. See what steel the frame is made of too, and look it up con internet to get more refetences. But those are great bikes for the money. Not actually retro, I' d say; most retro races allow bikes up until 1987, a bike from say 1994 is too ...


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You could: measure the chain stretch sight if the chainrings and cogs are worn out check the wear of the tires remove the seatpost and peak inside the frame for rust pull the brakes and inspect closely the cables for rust check the wheels for trueness measure the weight of the bike with an electronic scale rock the handlebars gently to check for drag in ...


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That bike is much older than 10 years. Probably somewhere in the '80s The bike pictured below is quite similar to yours, and was built in 1985. [Source: Peugeot 1985 product folder] Note however that these frames are generally of good quality, and if not terribly rusty can be used for many more years (and of course are very cool and retro looking). ...


6

If you know the model and exact year Bicycle Blue Book is a good place to start. This is a link to all the models for Peugeot: http://www.bicyclebluebook.com/BicycleDatabase.aspx?make=718


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I've always bought used bikes but I see it as a trade off: There's something joyous about an older bike. You can get a higher quality frame for the same price. You should also enjoy the process of searching for and weighing up the pros and cons of each bike you see. Its also worth mentioning that an awesome bike stays an awesome bike. My '98 Specialized ...


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An alternative for used cranks for an old bike for "beater" style usage is to get a cheap, unbranded (new) chainset online. You will at least then have the assurance of any warranty that the company provide, and much lower chance of getting sold something broken. In the UK there are websites like SJS Cycles which provide parts in all price ranges. Last year ...


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I've actually never seen bent cranks, so that's probably the least of your worries. And if they are bent, then I don't think you'd be able to tell until they're mounted on the bike. Bringing pedals is a good idea - not to check for straightness, but to check if the pedal threads are damaged. If they're square-taper cranks, you should also check the dust cap ...



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