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13

Delicate items would probably survive best in a small backpack. Your body acts like a natural shock absorber so anything strapped to your back should get the smoothest ride, especially if you're out of the saddle for the bumpiest sections. Remember to keep the pack light though. Put heavier items like milk on a rear rack, rear panniers or ideally on a ...


8

I don't transport a lot of groceries, but physics tells us that we really shouldn't worry about going up and down so much, but that we should worry more about things getting knocked around. An egg in the carton shouldn't break simply because you accelerate it quickly, it's going to get broken when it takes flight and then falls back down. Uneven pressure ...


6

For the most extreme conditions he'd want something like the Pugsley. For less extreme conditions any "mountain" bike should work fine. In a way, the trailer is probably less critical than the bike. So long as the tires are large enough in diameter to not get caught in potholes, and so long as they are sufficiently wide to not sink into the soil (given ...


6

Tri-Flow works the best. Any wax or lubricant that contains wax is only somewhat useful on a brand new chain, or a chain that has been thoroughly cleaned. Wax lubricant does not work well when riding in wet conditions because a lot more road grime gets kicked up into the drive train and the wax tends to do the opposite of what is advertised. You aren't ...


5

I prefer White Lightning. The major proviso is that you must shake it thoroughly before application. It's wax-based, so it generally picks up less dirt than most of the alternatives. You want to wash the "new chain goop" out before the first application, but after that don't normally need to clean the chain at all -- just add more lube every few weeks (or ...


4

I've seen both P-clamps (a.k.a. brace clamps) and the similar, ratcheting versions used. This is actually the preferred method for some front racks on bicycles without rack braze-ons on the fork. As long as they're the right diameter, and there's a little rubber (even an old tube) between the fork and the clamp, it should work fine.


4

How do you feel about modifying your trailer? adding some suspension could absorb some of the bumps bigger wheels and high profile (i.e. lots of rubber) low pressure tyres would also go a long way towards smoothing out bumps in the road, though a warning: if they're too wide they might reduce your manoeuvrability with the trailer attached some permanent ...


3

Something like the Bob trailer could be useful. It has suspension. The BoB trailer is a one wheeled trailer so probably modifying yours to work like the Bob would be impossible. However if you were to build a new one making something like the bob could be a good idea. My understanding is that one wheel trailers are better for rough conditions. ...


2

this actually works.. run down to Home Depot and buy a couple of metal corner brackets flatten them out, primer, and paint them to match basket, attach to basket legs and axle. Done.


2

I've had experience transporting a laptop, which I also didn't want to jostled. The best padding for it was not an official "laptop sleeve", but wrapping it in bulking fleece jacket, and then stuffing that into my pannier, which made a tight fit. I would be inclined to take the same approach with a carton of eggs: wrap them in fleece jacket, stuff that in a ...


1

Trailer There is a big difference in what you can use on a graded surface or dirt road versus an ungraded track or single track. If the primary use is graded at about the width of a car and relatively smooth you can get away with almost any single or double wheel trailer. If they are mostly rough or single-track you will do best with a single wheel ...


1

If your looking for a "beater" fixie that you don't have to worry about getting stolen and maintaining, it might be worth checking out Craigslist. I see fixies come up every couple days in my area. IMO, its not worth spending the $ on a brand new bike to be your beater bike. If you want something brand new, Redline makes some nice bikes that are usually a ...


1

If you've never tried Boeshield's T-9, I highly recommend it. It's the bike advocate's WD-40. Fairly lightweight penetrating dry lube. It's a good balance of most traits - it goes on clean, is fairly long lasting for being as lightweight as it is, doesn't build up (quickly), and it's very easy to apply if you get the aerosol version. I use it for road and ...


1

Have you considered trying something with a different application method? Hosing your chain down with Tri-Flow works, but there is a lot of excess to go along with that. This summer, I switched from T9 to using motor oil on my chains, and it seems to work well in all the areas you discussed. I have heard a lot of people don't like using motor oil, but it ...



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