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33

The main thing is that the Presta valve is thinner, and takes less of a bite out of the rim. This is quite important as the rims get narrower. Further, the Presta works better with hand pumps in that there's no spring that the pump needs to overcome to get air into the tire. Also, the Presta always has the fully-threaded body (which is possible with ...


28

The cap keeps dirt and rocks away from the valve, particularly the fragile release mechanism. It's not the end of the world if the caps are missing, but I suggest leaving them on. They don't take that long to remove and replace.


20

This primarily comes up as the pressures in the tires get higher. With lower pressure wider tires, Schrader makes the most sense, if only because you can hit a gas station for some air pressure. Presta makes more sense on higher pressure tires, since it allows you to pump in higher levels with a floor pump. Per the comments let me try and clarify. When ...


14

Nobody has noted this yet, so maybe I'm particularly clumsy. The caps prevent you from bending the somewhat delicate presta valve stem if, like me, you're fitting a fairly beefy lock between your spokes every day. I smacked mine pretty good after a groggy morning commute, and it bent the valve stem pretty severely. They're somewhat known for snapping off ...


14

smaller hole in the rim is good (presta +) schrader has piece that inserts into the valve (screws in) with a spring mechanism to seal it - these parts sometimes fail (schrader -) presta uses tire pressure to seal it (presta +) rocks can lodge in uncapped schrader and cause leaks (schrader -) presta does not need a valve cap to keep rocks out (presta +) ...


13

It's a "dunlop" valve. Also called "woods". I used to see this years ago in BMX bikes. For best results we'd use to have a schrader adapter (google: dunlop to schrader adapter) so we could inflate with schrader pumps.


11

Presta's main benefit is more about how the valve functions, in regards to getting pumped up to higher pressures. Because the stem of the valve needs pressure in the pump head to get high enough before it pushes the valve stem in, and start flowing air into the tire, when you try to get to 120 to 160 lbs of pressure it works better than a Schrader valve ...


10

That is a Presta Valve. Your pump, I am going to guess, is a Schrader Valve. You can buy a Presta pump from a shop or buy a $2 adapter.


10

Those valve stems are too short for those deep deep rims you've got on there. You can tell just from the photos that the valve stem isn't sticking out far enough from the rim for the pump to fit all the way on it. Hence, it's not contacting the valve enough for you to inflate your tires.


7

It is for adjusting the suspension on a medium to high-end mountain bike (fork), hence the lack of 'Presta' option. Since you will be returning it, to keep the shop happy and get what you really need, consider getting: A track pump with gauge and aluminium body. Look for one with a well engineered head that does Presta and Shrader valves. The easiest ones ...


7

Schrader valves are more robust, this is the reason why you see them universally in use for vehicle tires. With Presta, you have to be more careful when putting in or taking off the pump nozzle or you might bend or even break either the rotating (locking) tip of the valve. You could also go to literally any gas station to pump air to your tires if you are ...


7

Schrader valves are stronger, for one. Breaking a weaker, smaller valve that has a (perhaps just in my experience) frustrating attachment mechanism for pumps on a $1,000+ fork would be unacceptable. Road Bicycles Schrader valves have at least one valid disadvantage on a road bicycle: their larger diameter is a deterrent for use because it reduces the ...


6

I've also had fewer issues with crap clogging the valve with presta valves; as long as you remember to spin the valve closed you don't need a valve stem cap. This is particularly important if you're riding in mud or dirt. I run presta on both my road and mountain bikes for this reason.


6

Because you only fill one tire at a time. The adapter screws off and can be used on either tire if needed. It can also be easily stored with your patch kit, so it doesn't need to be on the bike. I only keep one around in case I get stuck with only a schraeder pump at my disposal.


6

I used to skin my knuckles every time I took the chuck off the valve. Then I figured it out (pain is a learning curve accelerator). Position the wheel so the presta valve is closest to you and pointed away from you. Use your thumbs on either side of the wheel to push the chuck straight off (toward the hub of the wheel). This prevents the presta stem from ...


6

On my MTB I leave them on to keep mud from crudding up the works. On road and commuter bikes they are useless and I toss them.


5

They have one big benefit on road / commuting bikes - they stop the valve corroding and seizing due to the salt and crap they get exposed to. On a mountain bike, this isn't such a problem, as the salt gets washed off by puddles and mud (and you tend to wash your mountain bike more). That's been my experience in the muddy, wet UK, when the roads are salted ...


5

My conclusion after many years of using not two, but three types of valves is that the best is the one that results most practical for you, acording to type of riding, type of pumping methods available and of course the type of bike/tire/rims you are using. Neither valve type is absolutely better than other, but one of them may result better for your ...


5

I swapped out both tubes on my mountain bike with Presta (less chance of crap getting in to the valve and it means I can carry the same CO2 inflator as I do on my road bike) and got the bushings - once they were in I've had zero issues with the valve stem. I'd definitely recommend putting one in since there's the chance that the valve stem could rub against ...


5

Yes, the holes are different sizes. 6mm and 8mm, from memory. The hole size matters if you have skinny rims as 8mm out of a 20mm rim is a lot compared to 8mm out of a 40mm rim. But you already have valve holes. In theory putting a presta valve in a Schrader-size hole matters, in practice it doesn't. The base of the valve is where you'll see any effect from ...


4

Yes, you can remove the adapter and put it on the rear tire. The reason for putting on an adapter is so that you can use air-compression equipment which is available at gas stations etc. You don't actually need it if you have a good pump at home which is two fit (presta and schrader).


4

Keep the cap on to protect the valve from accidental damage, dirt, salt and oxygen. There is a bit of rubber inside the Presta valve: Leave the valve cap off and oxygen in the air gets to the rubber causing it to perish. This problem will take time to develop, however it will do regardless of where you live, where you ride and how often you clean your ...


4

Make sure you unscrew the presta valve first. There is a small top piece that must be unscrewed before you place the pump onto the valve. If all is correct, you should be able to press onto the presta valve and air will be released. Once your presta valve is open, place the pump nozzle over the valve with the locking tab DOWN. Press firmly (you might ...


4

Having looked a bit closer, I see these are tubeless specific road wheels. These shouldn't need a rim tape at all. Just, make sure no rim tape ist mounted, stick the valve in, screw it on and mount your tires. PS. This has complete instructions on page 10. http://www.dtswiss.com/Resources/Support/WHEELS/WHEELS-User-Manual.pdf


4

Some rims have a small-diameter drilling for presta valves, so a schraeder (car-type) valve won't fit. If your rim is drilled for schraeder valves, you can use presta valves, but you should use a plastic adapter sleeve to hold the valve in position and avoid wear to the valve stem or the edge of the drilling.


3

I find just a short, sharp (karate-style) chop about an inch back from the valve works well. You'll want to make sure it's straight though to minimise stress on the valve.


3

I don't use them is if someone is into racing and we are looking at changing a flat being important down to the second. In that case it is just another impediment to speed. Otherwise it keeps the system (whether presta, schrader or dunlop) clean and easy.


3

The adapter is only meant to be used while pumping up the tire. You shouldn't keep it installed while riding. Many bicycle pumps can be used with both presta and shrader valves, but I'd reccomend that you keep a pump around that can pump presta natively so that you never need to mess with the valve adapter.


3

A Schrader valve can be pumped up with a car pump, often it is easer to find someone with a car pump than a bike pump when needed. (You can also use a bike pump when needed) Also a cheap car foot pump is a lot better than most bike pumps.



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