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38

The obvious few things are: Front light Red rear tail light Spare batteries for said lights Spoke lights/reflectors for improved side visibility Bright clothing, ideally cycling clothing with reflective strips on them.


24

Get a Bright Bike kit from brightthread.com: Bright Bike DIY kits cover your bicycle in easy-to-apply design-savvy ultra reflective vinyl for safety. It is like covering your bike with a big stickers that turn ultra-bright in headlights. The retroreflective vinyl is the same material used on the backs of running shoes, but with colors. The kits greatly ...


21

The short answer is that, in practical terms, the difference isn't great. The longer answer requires some explanation of "visual conspicuity." In optical engineering, conspicuity is the study of what makes things "conspicuous," and some researchers split the tasks into "detection" and "identification" (see, for example, the works of A. Toet et al, such as ...


19

I should imagine you should be looking for some reflective gloves. Or even some glo gloves Check these out as an example ... http://lifehacker.com/395978/glo-gloves-reflective-cycling-gear Also using a good reflective jacket that has good reflective strips down the arms is useful.


12

Take Karl Lagerfeld's advice: It’s yellow; it’s ugly, it doesn’t go with anything; but it could save your life.


12

While the obvious answer is that you really should have lights and a reflective jacket or vest, I'm assuming this is the real world and you have limited resources! Let's go by what conditions you ride in: If your route is mostly well-lit and being seen is more of a requitement, I'd concentrate on a decent cycling jacket or safety vest. I prefer ...


11

The human eye is more sensitive to some colours, peak sensitivity is at the yellow-green portion of the visible spectrum. So generally speaking, a yellow vest or jacket should be better than an orange one.


11

1. Wear hi-visibility color on your torso. That really bright yellow/green color is best. The orange is pretty good, too. I've seen stuff that's striped in both colors or is primarily one with a some bands of the other, and that seems like probably the best option, so that you still stand out against a background that matches the hi-viz color. Helmet ...


10

Yes, get a jacket. Also, you can get reflective bands which you can put around your ankles - I think these show up really well to drivers. For road riding, it's all about being safe and that means you need to be seen by others. Top of the range expensive lights will help you see where you're going. They will help drivers see you too, but most drivers have ...


10

YELLOW - and according to EN471... There are regulations for high visibility clothing used by people that work on highways. Their employers have a duty of care to make sure they are in the correct HV wear. In the UK the standard is BS EN471 and this applies pretty much the same across the whole EU. 3M - the people that pioneered high visibility clothing - ...


9

3M makes Scotchlite tape that is very reflective. My wife used craft punches to punch flower shapes out of it and covered her bike with it. Her bike gets noticed day and night. I haven't noticed any mention of flags here. Particularly on trailers or recumbents, a flag gives you a bit more height, plus the motion attracts attention. My wife hung a bunch of ...


9

Don't forget side visibility. Spoke lights are great for making you visible at crosswalks or traffic lights.


8

You could also turn your wheels into programmable displays using Ladyada's kit, which exploits persistence of vision. Some assembly required.


8

I uses the Down Low Glow which is a tube light that mounts to your down tube. It creates an area of illuminated pavement around you which most motorists in my area treat as the "no-zone". I generally feel safer riding at night than during the day because motorists will allow for more passing distance.


8

Helmet lights are good. Usually in addition to one on the handlebars. The pro of the helmet light is that you can light up things that are not directly infront of you. The pro of having an additional light is that it increases the chance of being seen and adds extra illumination for you. The con is that if you are looking to the side and a car is ...


7

Similar to the LED gloves, you can always make a signaling jacket. I bet I know a few of our friends that would be totally down helping with that ;)


7

I think the best approach here is one of convention rather than the physics of color sensitivity, in other words, consideration for what makes the most sense to an approaching driver. In north america, "slow moving vehicles" (such as farm tractors and Amish buggies) use an orange triangle with a red border. The point of such markings is to communicate to ...


7

What the code is saying is that your headlight has to be visible on the sides. That's why most modern bicycle headlights have those little clear plastic channels on the side for the light to seep through and be seen from the side. ( The idea isn't to blind people GordonM ) Maybe it really reaches 300 feet, maybe it doesn't, the traffic police probably ...


7

Some local recumbent users have a different style flag on their bikes rather than the rectangle or the pennant. I couldn't find a photo online, but the flag is about a 1~1.5 meters tall, and the poll runs up the whole length of it. It is then about a half meter wide. There is very little flapping around and nothing loose to blow in faces and get tangled ...


6

Putting reflective bands on your sleeves can help make your movements visible. They don't need to be attached permanently: a second pair of trouser clips works very well when strapped around your cuffs, or possibly the cuffs of your gloves if you're wearing big winter gloves. Something like Ron Hill snap bands (there are lots of equivalent products with ...


6

I have been using Monkeylectric spoke lights for two years now. They're very bright persistence-of-vision spoke lights that blit out patterns in a beautiful range of colors. Love em. Unlike Ladyada's kit, these work out of the box, though you can reprogram them if you so wish.


6

Of course, having some good bright lights is a must for being visible at night! The Bicycles Stack Exchange Blog now has the most comprehensive bike taillight review on the internet (to our knowledge): Review of the Best Bicycle Tail Lights in 2012 In total I reviewed fifteen different tail lights. The Cygolite Hotshot performed best in the most ...


5

I use a generator front hub and front and rear lights. This setup is very expensive: the wheel itself can run almost 500 dollars. The very best of these generators and lights are imported from Germany by only a few importers, and are not widely available here in the US. There are a couple of reasons I like generator lights: No need to charge them. No ...


5

A safety vest can help, they can get a bit warm but I have wrapped my backpack in one for extra visibility on the commute


5

In addition to lots of reflective material and a good headlight, I recommend the super-bright Dynotte 400R tail-light. This light is the brightest I could find commercially available and seems to be visible from more than 1/2 mile away in bright sunshine (and much further at night). I ride with it on at all times of day while commuting year round. In ...


5

The obvious places are on the basket, on the fork crown, or on the fork itself, although they may require mounting hardware or a different light altogether. Reading this may get you some ideas. Looking at the Reelight line-up may also spark your imagination. Or you could also go with unconventional solutions like Revolights.


5

There are various extension mounts you can buy or build to reposition lights and other handlebar-mount items. I have a purchased unit that can be adjusted maybe 2" higher than the bar, and which can mount on either the bar or the stem. You can also craft something with a short piece of plastic pipe, a few screws and brackets, and some cleverness.


4

If bikesandcode's suggestions aren't enough you could always paint your mudguard reflective like this: http://www.instructables.com/id/Paint-your-bike-bicycle-gear-reflective/ Like this: There are some other suggestions on the same site for wrapping the frame in reflective material.


4

Yellow and orange high visibility vests both do a good job of reflecting light. The Wikipedia article on high-visibility clothing mentions the first use of 'safety' orange Experimental use of high-visibility clothing began in 1964 on the Scottish Region. Fluorescent orange jackets, known as "fire-flies" What isn't clear in the article is how ...


3

As a car driver I recommend flashing LEDs front and rear, and also reflective strips around the ankles; both of these really catch my attention early. DO NOT ASSUME the car driver can see you just because you can easily see the car. At night or dusk cyclists and pedestrians are often invisible, and in our lower position we can be blinded by other cars' ...



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