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10

That's an impressive amount of mileage on a single chain. Especially on a narrow 11-speed one. I'm guessing that you keep everything very well maintained and don't ride in much wet weather? The two main problems you'll get from a worn cassette are: Skipping chain (either between cogs or jumping on a single cog) Premature chain wear (as the chain ...


10

I would say that this won't have any effect. Flipping the chainring on a single speed makes sense as you use the other side of the teeth on the chainring which have not been used before. But with the chain it's a different story: The stretch is independent of directions so reversing its direction won't change anything. Also on the small "rolls" in the chain ...


9

A stretched chain will wear out gears (especially the rear cassette). You can see when this because the teeth get worn away to points - it's very obvious. But it's very unlikely you wore out a chain and gears in 1000 Km. What is more likely is that the cable has stretched slight from new and the derailuer is out of adjustment so it is putting the chain ...


9

While I'm not a road biker, I can speak from experience with mountain bike tires. The first spot to wear is the center of the tread. Why? It's the part that is ridden on the most. Increasing the width of your tire with increase the contact patch (the part of the tire touching the ground); therefore, your wear is going to be the same because that contact ...


8

Presumably with 12K+ km, and never having bought new chain rings, you have a very high cadence. You should get a new chain every time you change your cassette, btw. If you are doing the work yourself, I don't see any reason to change the chain ring immediately. Try the new cassette and chain and see how it works. If it isn't broke, don't fix it. If it ...


8

This is common and is a result of the constant friction and increased heat of the small roller on the trainer. Larger diameter rollers will see lower degradation of the tire, but it will still be a problem. Most riders I know use less expensive tires, or older tires that they no longer trust for use on the road when they switch to the trainer.


7

It all very much depend on your conditions. If you have a lot of dirt and grime on the road, expect pads to wear out quicker. I'd say adjust pads position after 600km is normal, nothing to worry about.


6

Trainers are notorious for chewing up regular tires. They do sell trainer tires that are built to take the rubbing and wear that a trainer dishes out. What a lot of people do is buy a cheap wheel (Such as a neuvation or similar), throw a trainer tire on it and use that when they mount their bike to the trainer.


6

Without experience, or obvious damage, a cassette gauge like the one from Rohloff, or mileage are your best options for deciding when to replace a cassette. For me, a good rule of thumb has been: 10 chains = 2 cassettes = 1 set chain rings That is, I change my chain every 1200-1500km. I change the cassette on the 5th time I change the chain. And I change ...


6

As @GaryRay has stated trainers are tough on tires. One condition that accelerates the wear is low pressure in the tire and high pressure on the roller. Many riders would not think of going for a ride without checking tire pressure but forget about checking the trainer tire. The low pressure on the tire and high roller pressure generates heat from the ...


5

The lifespan of brake pads is not only dependant upon environmental conditions but also very much upon what is put into them. I'm compelled to point out there is a massive difference between the compounds that manufacturers put into brake pads. I've no idea what compounds are actually in them but I'd describe some as "rubbery", some as "gritty", and many ...


5

The chain is what causes all the wear on your drive components. It is called chain stretch but your chain does not stretch it wears at each pin or rivet and increases in length. When this wear is excessive it wears the cassette teeth, chain set teeth and the jockey wheels on your rear gear. When all this equipment is new, Keep it clean and oiled. Buy ...


5

I wore out my chain and gears ... Are there other things I should be doing to avoid replacing my chain/gears every season? ... I am a novice who mostly just commutes to work, so assume I know very little about form. One bit of self-maintenance (as well as keeping your tires pumped) is to keep your chain lubricated. If your chain isn't lubricated then ...


5

I would only replace if: The chain is skipping because of wear of the teeth You get chainsuck even when the chain is clean (small chainrings are more prone to chainsuck) For cassettes I would not consider changing unless it skips when you have put on a new chain. The best tactic is to change your chain often enough so that you minimise the wear in your ...


4

Judging by Sheldon's Guide, it definitely looks like you are in need of a new chainring. Your middle and larger sprockets in particular look like they have taken on a significant ramp-like profile, which will surely lead to lackluster shifting.


4

Why do you wear chainrings quickly? Cross Chaining - If you tend to be in the big ring on the back and the big ring on the front at the same time, you're probably doing it wrong. Same with running the small ring on the front with the small ring on the back. This can cause uneven wear on the front chainrings due to the awkward angles the chain must bend. ...


4

Just to give you a boundary case on how quickly pads can and do wear have a look at my current bike: I replaced my rear brake pads in Nov 2012. It is now almost March 2013 - so 4 months have passed. My rear brake pad is totally worn and riding metal on metal. I am going to replace it next weekend. Here are my stats: 4 Months Riding 30 Days/month ...


3

Here is the list of things I usually check for when troubleshooting jumping gears: Is the chain always goes up/down? In this case usually the adjustment is off. Try adjust the cable. Is the mech hanger bent? Sometimes during a crash you can bend a mech hanger. Most of the times you can bend it back, but there are cases where you need to replace the mech ...


3

Keep in mind that this was the norm for derailers, pre-indexing. Indexing wasn't possible with the old style drivetrains because you needed to overshift slightly to force the chain to jump sprockets, especially when shifting to a larger sprocket. What changed was mainly the addition of what I call "ramps" on the sides of the sprockets. These catch the ...


3

In most cases it will be a combination of several of the factors you describe. It can be a tuning problem. In this case normally the gear change will work in one direction but not in the other one. If it is only a tuning problem, it may be fixed quite easily by tuning your derailleur correctly. Also for this type of problem it is characteristic that it can ...


2

Generally, one drops a chain during a down shift. Sometimes it happens only when you shift quickly or under heavy load, but it does happen. There are a few things that can cause a chain to miss the inner chainring: A maladjusted front derailleur or shifter, a very worn or dirty drivetrain, a bent or loose chainring, or a maladjusted chainline (the line which ...


2

EDIT: this answer uses an extreme example, perhaps irresponsible, I admit, but which tried to state some things which I think are valid considerations regarding the question asked: Sprockets can be used for very long provided you change the chain frequently; That COULD mean there are a lot of usable cassettes being thrown away that could still give more ...


2

You may have flat-spots on the rear tyre and I am not sure whether I would want that on the front. Plus you will be spending a lot longer with the tyre levers if you 'rotate' them. Valves are a bit sensitive too - mess with the tyre/tube too often and the valves can 'waggle' out of the tube. Personally I would let the back one wear out and replace it when it ...


2

I use to successfully reshape chainrings like these using a round file (diameter more or less similar to the chain roller). This is a tried and tested method, and is very easy (much more than doing the same with the cogs, which I also do when needed). The only limitation is with skill and time, since it is a bit monotonous and require a bit of labor. You ...


2

By looking on the shape of the tooth on the biggest cog, it looks worn out and a time for a replacement. Grinding feeling on a clean chain is always a sign of wear. Also worn-out cassette will will wear out chains much quicker. And you already feel that - second chain got only 50% of usage from the first chain. I would just replace the cassette, before ...


1

I would not worry about it. I run my shocks with ProPedal on most of the time, and something else has always broken well before the rear shock gave out. You're not going to do any extra harm to the shock just because you ran it down a descent with ProPedal on. You should be more worried about bottoming the shock out or not keeping it properly serviced.


1

While shocks are certainly meant to be locked out and ridden, even over semi-rough terrain, there are probably some limits to the design. I'm not a fork/shock mechanic, but what I know about fluid dynamics tells me that you shouldn't do this too often! When you lock out your fork/shock it limits that compression of the fluids inside or prevents compression ...


1

All of my biking is on the road. I usually run a 1 1/4 inch tire on the rear, and consistently get 2000 miles until the cords begin to show. This year I am running on 1 3/8 inch tire, and I now get 2100 miles until the cords show. The difference between 1 1/4 and 1 3/8 isn't much, mathematically speaking, but it looks much wider than the numbers indicate. ...


1

Common sense says you're correct in your assumption of wide tires wearing more slowly. The middle of the tire will wear rapidly to take the crown off of the tire. Then, once the crown is flattened out and the wear shifts towards the sides of the tire, the wear slows down significantly. There are so many variables for tire wear it isn't funny. You have front ...



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