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37

It is possible, but only in certain conditions. I live in a tropical country, so, 20 degrees centigrade is considered cold here. My conmute to work is almost flat, with only one climb, something a very steep 300 meters. If it were not for that, I'd be able to get to the office almost completely dry. What's the trick? I use a hardtail mountain bike with a ...


27

The answer to this question is different if you are going on a long-distance tour rather than going-to-work-and-back. If on tour and facing the prospect of a struggle to do 30 miles when you really wanted to get 100 miles in (e.g. to get to next camp-site) it can be a better idea to not bother, sit out the wind and have a go later that day/evening or the ...


26

I deal with this at least once a week. Yesterday I was going 18km and hour with a heart rate of 175bpm (normally that's 35+). I get on the drops on my bar to reduce my wind profile. I try to stay on less busy streets (normally I'm out in the farm area) because the side gusts will cause swerving. Pay very close attention to what's behind you b/c of swerving. ...


21

If you are riding on the road, slicks are fine in the wet. If you need to go over any mud, etc. then you'll need something else. From Sheldon Brown: Bicycle tires for on-road use have no need of any sort of tread features; in fact, the best road tires are perfectly smooth, with no tread at all! Unfortunately, most people assume that a smooth ...


20

Even a short sprint or uphill effort can make a big difference in how sweaty I am when I get to the office. Maintain a consistently low effort, using low gears for any uphills. Panniers are good, since backpacks and messenger bags not only insulate, but also hold your shirt directly against your sweaty back. Often I'll put my shirt in my pannier and just ...


17

Some suggestions: Stay in lower gears and cycle at a higher cadence. Using lower gear will help you to maintain momentum when hit by gust full on, and to retain control when hit by crosswind gust. Keep a low profile Avoid baggy clothes Find a cycling partner and share slip streaming


16

I have a continuum of clothes that I add on as the weather gets colder. During the summer, I ride like you do with shorts and a t-shirt. As things cool of a little bit, down below 60F/15C, I'll put on a windbreaker over my t-shirt and some full-finger gloves on my hands. The next step for me is to add an Under Armour Cold Gear shirt (many companies make ...


16

Everyone else has offered good advice, but let me point out one simple thing for you: Almost no matter how hot it is or how hard I'm riding, I'm not really sweaty until I stop moving. That's because 1) I'm wearing bike clothes designed to wick moisture and evaporate it quickly, and 2) almost no matter what the weather is doing, while I'm moving I'm headed ...


15

Protective plates? You mean Fenders/Mudguards? I can think of 3 things that could help, other than simply bringing a change: Bigger fenders (wider, and/or go down the tire more). Basically, some fenders are better than others. A front fender that's wider than the tire with a stay (rod) going back for support that hugs the tire fairly closely and ...


15

I took a pretty quick look at the map, but I'm going to make a kind of general suggestion: If this is a trip that you're only used to traveling by motor vehicle, you might fall into the trap of thinking that the route you're used to is the only route available. Bikes can go lots of places that cars can't, and lots of places that cars just as frequently ...


12

Oftentimes, you sweat the most just when you finish the ride, as you've just been pedaling at full effort, but you don't get the wind generated by the moving bike. Oftentimes you need to stand around in a warm space, like I need to wait in the very warm freight elevator lobby. Try to take it easy especially for the end of the ride, and hold something cold ...


11

I have actually commuted in a very dangerous, hilly, bike un-friendly city (Tegucigalpa, Honduras). Here there are zero facilities for bike commuters, no racks on public transport, no bike parking anywhere and of course, no showers at workplace. I have tackled the problem with following strategies: Leave home with plenty of extra time. When you travel to ...


10

Most rides in the cold I start out freezing. Once my body has generated some heat I'm great. Typically my outer layer is wind blocking followed by a jersey. Depending on the temperature I'll have either a long sleeve polypro shirt or just my arm warmers under that. I have both leg warmers and fleece lined tights. I wear the tights if it's colder. If it's ...


10

I've used a Brooks saddle in a similar climate (Vancouver, BC) without any major issues. Treat the topside with Proofide every 6-12 months and keep the underside dry (fenders, wedge bag, etc). Store the bike in a dry place between rides so that the leather can dry out naturally. A saddle cover would probably help but I've never used one.


9

What worked for me in an admittedly flat terrain - I used a heartrate monitor. In my spare time I calibrated it a bit - at which heartrate do I get sweaty? Then on the trip to work, I make sure that I stay about 5% below that rate. At 45, my sweat heartrate was about 110, so I stayed below 105. My trip is 21 km in each direction.


9

No. It absolutely isn't. You know what happens when an umbrella catches the wind. Imagine that on an unstable device doing 30 mph. Even without wind the rain will be blowing in your face most of the time so you'd have to place the umbrella right in front of you for it to offer any kind of effective shielding from the rain. How are you supposed to ...


8

Basically, getting "sweaty" is a function of the temperature, humidity, clothing, level of effort, length of exercise, and your personal propensity to sweat. If you're dressed lightly enough, the weather is not too bad (below 75F and maybe 60% humidity), you travel only a short distance (maybe 2 miles max) on relatively level ground, and you maintain a ...


7

I do my best to tack. Kind of like a sail boat. For example If I'm riding in the city and the winds are from the south I'll ride a mile or so south and then head east for a block or so to catch a break, head south for a mile or so and then head west a bit to catch a break. It sure lengthens the ride but it can be good to get the short recovery periods. If ...


7

"No-sweat cycling" is a much talked about art that will never be perfected. Luckily, you don't have to be perfect to make riding to work in your work clothes a viable option. I do it several times a week (in NYC, over a bridge), some days finding more success staying sweat-free than others. A couple keys: Weather is a big determining factor. If it's ...


7

No. Cycling while holding something in your hand is inherently dangerous. You have much less control over the bike and you can only operate one of the brakes. You can buy various contraptions for attaching an umbrella to a bicycle. There's also the Uberhood: However, this got a poor review in The Guardian Bike Blog: once open atop the bike it ...


6

I've never had a pair of MTB shoes that are waterproof though I wouldn't doubt if they exist. Even if they were you'd still have water coming of your shin and into the shoe (this is what makes even waterproof shoe covers a bit wet inside). I just tough it out. I have a set of neoprene shoe covers that keep my feet warm and maybe even dry depending on how ...


6

I've personally never seen or heard of a waterproof spray that will protect against soaking. Water hitting the material might run off fairly well, but a continuous rain soaks it so much that water will just seep through. That might not be a problem for commuting, but I'm assuming that if you're going through the extra step of double water-proofing, you're ...


6

There has been some good advice here so far: about packing your business clothes seperately during your ride riding before the temperature rises in the morning using a low gear But essentially you are asking "how can I prevent sweat during exercise?" There is no cure for sweating since it is a natural mechanism the body excretes to cool your internal ...


6

I live in Hawaii and it gets sort of humid at times. What I like to do is secure those ice pack lunch bags to the back of my backpack so it keeps my back cool during the ride. It helps a lot since the heat from your torso seems to feel the worse when you begin sweating.


6

An electric bike which helps you uphill will lower-down the effort leading into less sweating. I tested two of them and the feel is quite natural – it automatically adds power when you step into pedals a little more while let you just ride if you want to go calm.


6

Maybe you could strap one of these to your helmet. Then at least your hands are free and it's always pointed in the right direction. It'd probably get torn away in super high wind (hopefully not with your head). I couldn't find a picture but you could even try it with one of those deep, shoulder width, clear umbrellas too. Then your shoulders would be ...


6

Small changes in bike fit make dramatic differences in performance. Heat and humidity make a big difference.


6

Living in Denmark, I have ridden a bike almost every day of my life since I turned 5. I do not claim to be any kind of expert, I just see biking as an every day rutine. I ride my bike to work every day. I break into sweat real easy in the summer, when temperatures often rises above 20 degrees C if not in shorts, which I cannot wear to work. So how do I ...


6

It's no problem, but there are a few things to consider: Keep all the moving parts well oiled. Note that even if you only ride on roads there will be more dirt getting on it, so you'll need to give the chain a good clean, let it dry, and oil it. This should stop the mechanicals getting too rusty, some screw heads will rust but not too badly. Wet rims ...


6

According to French wikipedia, automatic pedals seem to be clipless pedals. A wide range of manufacturers make waterproof shoe covers (also known as overshoes or booties), for use with both clipless pedal systems as well as your usual set of sneakers (be sure to check out the particular model to see if they're compatible. One designed solely for clipless ...



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