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The only solution for me has been to stop outdoor cycling completely in favor of indoor cycling in air conditioned home with fan. I live in southwest Florida where weather is consistent - +90 degrees F, 90% humidity. For 15 years after retirement, I was cycling approximately 100 miles weekly. Increasingly severe physical and mental heat exhaustion ...


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Spandex. Wear spandex. When it is hot, I usually wear as little as possible, but on a bicycle spandex works great. Ride faster when possible so that you have wind for cooling. Wearing cotton just gets wet and sweaty fast and cotton insulates, which is not good when it is hot.


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Is it necessary to stick to shadier routes? It is advantageous to ride along shadier routes. I ride along a tree-covered route in the Central Plains (Topeka, Kansas, USA—a converted rail bed with 75% coverage which runs along a creek for the vast majority of the route). On 100°F+ (38°C+) days, it generally runs between 10°F and 25°F (6°C and 14°C) lower ...


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I think it depends a lot on what you're used to. I doubt that everyone has the same upper or lower limit of temperature that they can cycle in. Acclimatisation is often overlooked. I ride all year round in the UK, which means most of my riding is in the range of 5-15 degrees C. Last year I attempted the international randoneé Paris-Brest-Paris and met ...


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Lets get this in perspective. 36˚C is one degree less than normal body temperature. When our body temperature rises above normal (37˚C) we are at risk of Heat Exhaustion. Since one of the symptoms of Heat Exhaustion is mental confusion, it can quickly become Heatstroke. Heat stroke is fatal in up to 80% of cases. Factors that increase the risks (see the ...


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Several questions, several answers: Is there a temperature above which you don't ride Yes, for me that's about 45°C. At that temperature where I live (Australia) the air is usually so hot that even wearing glasses it's hard to blink often enough to keep my eyeballs from drying out. Wrap-around glasses, complete skin coverage, and riding slowly is the ...


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Answering the sweat question Going without a helmet is not recommended as a solution. I suffered the same problems with sweat, (always in the left eye for some reason) and what helped me was to wear something inside the headband to absorb or direct the sweat elsewhere. scrap of cloth - worked okay but would often fall out and get lost. a woman's panty ...


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The fitter and smaller you are the less water you need. I went out for a ride 20 mile ride a couple weeks ago when the temperature was about as hot as you describe with high humidity. I carried two bottles and still had to stop twice for water. I'm 51. I used to be a racer, but I'm kinda slow now about 16 mph. When I was a racer and about 15 lbs lighter....


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97˚F isn't really that hot for a bike ride. Don't wear cotton; there's a reason cyclists wear lycra. It wicks away moisture and contributes significantly to evaporative cooling. Cotton gets damp and doesn't evaporate, which creates a heat-trapping barrier around you. Drink constantly; 2 bottles per hour is pretty common for long distance rides like ...


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I live in Southern California: if I didn't ride when it was hot I'd never ride. My suggestion is to hydrate way more than you think you'll need to. And I like to wear long sleeves of white moisture-wicking technical fabric. It keeps the sun off you and therefore keeps you cooler. And take more frequent stops to drink and eat a banana to replenish ...


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Cover each hole with a small piece of tape/sticker. It will help to keep water out certainly (if you are an all seasoned rider). But more importantly it will help you keep out small bits of gravel that could otherwise end up rattling around inside your wheel. My vote is for tape simply bc it would not risk drying out and falling into the wheel the way a ...


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It would be best if you could get 16 hole rim (yeah I know the may be hard to find). Holes on the rim go in the zig-zag pattern, and since you skip every second, all your spokes are on one (zig) side of the wheel. This is less than ideal, and in my humble opinion bigger concern than rain coming in empty holes.


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Well, the reason you might seal them is to reduce the risk of puncture, not rust. But rust is out of the question in any case if you're dealing with alu. What do you propose to seal them with? As far as I can tell there are two potential risks. First, you seal them with some substance which could actually wear the tube (this would be difficult because ...



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