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1

I have a trailer for my bicycle... Without the trailer I average 19 mph. The difference between adding the third wheel and 20~40 lbs is about 2~5 mph. Just keep everything lubed and tuned. Also steel frames are more springy/comfortable than aluminium as they absorb more of the bumps etc in the road. The biggest difference is in the rims. Spinning the rims ...


9

I have carried a laptop on my commute bike for closing in on 15 years now. Mainly in panniers (saddle bags). For a little while in a courier bag when when I was young and dumb. For what it is worth (aka the dangers of anecdotal evidence) I didn't have any laptop failures directly related to a bike trip. I even toured with a 17inch laptop across 800 km of ...


1

There are good bike bags for lap tops. Need water proof, padding, and solid mounting. Mount and unmount rapidly. Also consider how it carries off the bike. Does it look like a brief case so you can use it like a brief case during the day. To deal with length on the front wheel can help - that is how I carry. I don't like putting out a names but like the ...


1

I haven't carried a laptop in a saddle bag but I have used them a fair amount. You can definitely find a waterproof saddle bag that will carry a laptop. If your commute is smooth (i.e. pavement) your laptop should be fine. Two things to consider when choosing a saddle bag: 1) Ease of removal/attachment. Unless you are going to leave it on all the ...


0

I ride with 4 panniers and try to put slightly more weight forward than aft, to ease the load on the rear wheel. You need to get comfortable with the extra weight on the front wheel, but I did not find this difficult. Prior to putting more weight front than aft, I was blowing spokes & wearing my rear tire excessively. As stated elsewhere, you need to ...


-1

I love this question, and the answers are solid, but let me add that the weight of moving parts on a bike is more important than the weight of non-moving parts. So for my money, a heavier (read: steel) frame and lighter wheels is optimal. In addition, stopping an object with greater mass takes more energy, so if you've got those light wheels and some good ...


2

Well, the usual argument is that an average person can easily lose one or two kilos of body weight, and that would cost good money if you take it from the bike. On my experience, weight is more noticeable when riding uphill, but then, if you usually ride uphill I don't think you would want a single speed. Other issue would be speeding from a stop, or ...


3

The weight of a bike has virtually no effect top speed. It takes very nearly the same amount of effort to maintain a speed of 30 mph on a 20 lb bike and a 30 lb bike on flat ground. The biggest factors that come into play at high speeds are aerodynamics and rolling resistance ( slick, efficient tires ). ...



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