Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Probably the best source for answering this is Jobst Brandt's The Bicycle Wheel, the definitive text on the wire-spoked wheel and an essential for anyone interested in the art of wheelbuilding. Excerpted from page 68 of the 3rd edition: Spokes in a crossed pattern are usually interlaced at their last crossing before reaching the rim. Spokes coming from ...


10

A well built wheel should go years without needed truing. If you are truing the wheel every 2 months something is wrong with the build. There's no way to know via the internet, but my guess is that it's one of two things. The rim is bent slightly and requires significantly uneven tension in the spokes to get the rim true. There isn't enough tension in ...


9

A wheel is only as strong as the tension on the spokes. If the wheel was loose for any significant length of time before you noticed it, the spokes will fatigue very quickly, because they are flexing through a range of motion which is not intended. You are a big guy at 95 Kg, so this type of problem is not unusual (as am I). That means that you need to be ...


8

That depends on how good your ear is. If you can tune a stringed instrument effectively, then tensioning a wheel by ear is very effective. Identical spokes that have the same pitch when plucked should have the same tension within the margin of error for any tensiometer reading. The catch is you need a tensiometer to get the relative tone for the proper kg/f ...


8

When I build/maintain wheels, I specifically make an extra quarter-turn to the nipple and then quarter-turn backward to release the rotational tension. This was recommended by Sheldon Brown Lubing the spoke can help, but if your spokes are rusted, you might as well replace them with the new ones.


8

Whenever I get stuck wheelbuilding, I loosen every spoke one turn, walk away and come back in a few hours or the next day. The worst thing you can do is keep doing something that is not providing the results you expect. It is completely possible to overtighten spokes enough that they stretch significantly under the tension. You can even break them with a ...


7

I can't comment on doing a whole wheel this way, but I have seen wheel repairs done this way while touring. It did not work, I suspect for the reason that Jobst points out. The nipples unwound after a few days (at about 100km/day with perhaps 100kg load). Doing the spokes up tighter just broke spokes and stripped nipples. The mutual tensioning effect is IMO ...


7

There's no problem mounting a disc-compatible hub to rim-brake compatible rim. Just make sure they've got the same number of spokes and you're good to go. You're absolutely right about the opposite though, disc brake rims generally do not have a braking surface on them, the rim profile is round there, so it wouldn't work. And if you did try to brake on it, ...


7

The rim manufacturer should have this information. It depends a lot on the number of spokes, if the holes have eyelets (metal grommets) and the material of the rim. Lower spoke count wheels need more tension. Generally eyeleted wheels can handle more tension. As for symmetrical tension, that also depends. If the wheel is asymmetrical then your tension ...


6

In his book 'The bicycle wheel' Jobst Brandt, says that double butted spokes will be more resistant to fatigue failure when built into a wheel. This is because spokes break because of the cyclic stress they suffer as the wheel rotates. As the spoke rotates thru the bottom of the wheel it experiences a reduction in tension. Butted spokes are more ...


6

Place a single leading spoke and a single trailing spoke- both on the same side of the hub- to get your placement correct. That way you only have to unthread two spokes if you're off. Once you've got it right, unthread the leading spoke if you're planning on lacing trailing first or vice versa and proceed as normal with lacing.


6

The best suggestion I can make is to read "The Art of Wheelbuilding, by Gerd Schraner". As for materials: Use aluminum, double walled rims. They are stronger, lighter, and believe it or not easier for a new wheel builder to get true and round than steel rims will be. In addition, steel rims for a road bike will be difficult to come by in new condition. ...


6

You should check the wheel hubs. They may have too much free play. Take out the wheel and wiggle the axle. See Sheldon Brown's page here: http://sheldonbrown.com/cone-adjustment.html The new brake pads may be closer to the rims than the old ones so that the fault showed up.


6

Unless you have a lathe the tolerances are going to be too high for you to be able to to do an acceptable job here. Plus, I believe that the cone is surface hardened, after you grind through that the underlying material will be too soft. If you visit your local bike shop they should be able to match it up.


5

I think radial spokes are generally recommended only for front wheels, because they're weaker than normally-laced wheels especially under the asymmetric torsion applied to the rear wheel. WRT the drive forces: trailing spokes are necessary to transmit the drive force from the hub to the rim; radial spokes would make this transmission very spongy as the hub ...


5

According to the FAQ on their website: Note: PowerTap hubs must be laced with a minimum 2 cross pattern to avoid damage to the hub and maintain the warranty." That suggests that making the non-drive side radial could lead to warranty issues. Radial lacing does stress the flange more than tangential lacing so many hub manufacturers do not allow it. To ...


5

"Burrs on the hub" sounds bogus to me. Could be the case with a new hub, but burrs would be worn away with use. It seems most likely that the hub was reassembled by "unskilled labor" (the new/careless guy in the shop) and he didn't notice that the hub holes are directional -- there is a countersink on one side of the hole and not the other -- or didn't ...


5

As long as you verify the centering you don't need to do separate dishing. You will need the centering gauge: http://www.parktool.com/product/centering-gauge-1554-1 Do read the instructions and get comfortable making the centering adjustment. It's not difficult. Biggest thing to pay attention to is to SLOWLY lower the gauge into place. Happy Riding! (and ...


5

The one thing to be aware of is that disk brakes put more force on the spokes during breaking than rim brakes. Mostly this is not an issue as long as you do not use radial spoking. If you build up the wheel with 3x and anything but super silly light spokes, it should be no problem at all.


4

The biggest functional reason actually would be chain line. You could make the hub shell wider, and run an offset dropout to allow the space for the gears, but then you would have to run a similar offset on the bottom bracket to maintain a usable chain line. Running the offset on the bottom bracket would affect Q factor positioning on many riders, and ...


4

I don't know if this helps, but Peter White is a well-regarded framebuilder and wheelbuilder who has strong opinions on the Wheelsmith vs DT Swiss issue: http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/spokes.asp http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/DTspokes.htm The gist of his argument boils down to two (current) main differences: 1) DT Spokes have a 6.3mm elbow length vs ...


4

I can't find a current reference or photo, but we used to have one at my previous shop. If I remember correctly it was manufactured by J.A. Stein, but that may be wrong. It was a professionally made copy of a popular homemade wheel building tool. It was called a Stress Relief Box. It consisted of a 6 inch deep box, about 3 inches wider than a 700c rim. ...


4

Another book recommendation: The Bicycle Wheel by Jobst Brandt. He covers a lot of engineering detail (forces acting on wheel components, failure modes, etc) but also includes practical step-by-step instructions for wheel assembly.


4

A properly aligned TS-2 truing stand will show dish, as well as alignment. You rarely need additional adjustment after using it. However, if the stand is out of alignment, you may need to re-dish the wheel. The easiest and most accurate check for TS-2 alignment is a properly dished wheel. The best way to ensure that the wheel is properly dished, and ...


4

Wanted to add some photos of nipple drivers to augment @mikes's answer. Some are hex-shaft drill mounted drivers (top), some have straight screwdriver handles, others have offset handles to speed wheel building (bottom). They're handy for building up wheels quickly, but you need a proper spoke wrench for truing.


4

This blog post (google cache, original gone) on the Park site suggests a range of 20%, this thread has people saying a range of 1 on the TM-1 is fine (edited in some quotes): I sort of try to finish within a 0.1 mm error radially/laterally and under 0.5 notch (of the tension meter) of standard deviation for all spokes. I get DS tension under 1 notch ...


4

Daniel and Jahaziel are bang on with their comments, but it is probably worth expanding a little. Taking the front wheel, as this is more straightforward: If you assume a perfect world, a round rim, correct length spokes etc, then if the tension in every spoke is the same, and the tension in every spoke is the correct value for the rim, then you will have ...


4

I've heard before that a smaller wheel is actually stronger, and this site states the following. Because a 26-inch wheel has a smaller circumference than a larger 700c wheel, the rim is structurally stronger and resists deformation from impact. Wheels that are 26 inches excelled at handling hard drop-offs and even crashes without losing their true. The ...


3

The main problem in this type of debate is that most people will just quote "accepted" wisdom without personal experience. I will say at the outset that my own experience is limited to small wheeled folding bicycles. I have built wheels for several of these over the years and I always laced them until I came across a set of wheels that had been manufactured ...


3

Lubricating the eyelet with oil, and the spoke threads with Spoke prep or linseed oil is recommended. Anti seize is not lubricant. It should not be used in this capacity.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible