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11

You will need one special tool: a spoke wrench that fits the size of spokes you have. While a truing stand is great, you can do some basic truing of a bike with rim brake by simply putting the bike on a stand. Spin the wheel slowly and watch the space between the rim and the brake pad. When you have found the center of a an area that is listing to one ...


8

It is important to understand that spokes work in tension rather than compression. What that means is that the spokes at the bottom of the wheel are not 'doing anything'. The load is shared by all of the spokes to varying degrees and, particularly with cross-laced spoking patterns, that load gets dynamically transferred to use the strength of the available ...


8

The TS-2 is what I use and I quite like it. 3 of them are 17 years old and we just purchased a brand new one. Of course everyone likes the older ones ... hah. Anyways, in my opinion you do not NEED to buy the more expensive one. If you are truing 10+ wheels a day, yes you need it (in my opinion). For home mechanic work, the TS-8 is just fine.


6

The only real difference is that you want to make sure the spokes don't twist. Ksyriums come with a little fork dealy so you can hold the spoke straight (at least mine did). With others, you'll have to improvise your own tool--pliers with plenty of tape on the jaws so you don't scratch the spokes would do it. Hold the spoke on the flat part nearest the ...


6

The common qualification here is an important one: truing is a skill that benefits from practice and experience (chicken, meet egg). Your wheels are important, and it's important to have somebody who knows what they're doing at least check your work if you're just learning (or if you're disinclined to trust your well-being in dense traffic to wheels you ...


5

Jobst Brandt's definitive text "The Bicycle Wheel" has this to say on spoke tensioning: With tensioned wires as spokes, the wheel can support loads only to the point where its spokes become loose. At this point the wheel will collapse. Therefore, for greatest strength, spokes must be as tight as the rim permits. Structurally the rim supports spoke tension ...


5

The basic tool you would need is a spoke wrench. This will allow you to pull the rim (by the spokes) back into true. The spoke wrench is actually turning the spoke nipple out at the rim. The tool you would need in order to tell if it is true is a truing stand. The tool you will need to make it all work is your brain. =-]


5

If you haven't hit anything and you haven't parked your bike on a busy bike rack (other tires getting accidentally rammed into your spokes), the most likely culprit is a nipple vibrating loose. You can see if this is a likely possibility fairly easily...one, maybe two, of your spokes will be noticeably loose...less tension then the surrounding spokes ...


5

On a standard front wheel all spokes (both left and right) should (in theory) make the same musical note when plucked. A rear wheel is 'dished' to make room for the cassette. The non-drive side spokes will be at a lower tension (and pitch) than the cassette side. If you can find a bike with the same spokes and lacing pattern use that as a guide. If not, any ...


4

The bike shop that replaced your rim replaced it either incorrectly or with the incorrect part, I suspect. At least some of the 2007-2008 Trek 520 shipped with Bontrager Maverick rims, featuring an offset spoke bed. If they did in fact use the same spokes, and if they replaced it with a normal rim of appropriate ERD, the wheel will end up dished ...


4

As per the other responses, the main tool you need is a spoke wrench. You can use the frame itself as a truing stand. Other things to note are: Deflate the tyre before performing the re-truing. If you don't do this, you can end up drilling a hole through the rim tape with your spoke nipple. Look at the way the other spokes are laced to get the lacing of ...


4

The cheaper one will probably work reasonably well, but (crucial point) you'll need to use a dishing tool with it. With reasonably careful adjustment, a TS-2 can substitute for a dishing tool most of the time (i.e., anytime the dishing isn't really critical). You need a dishing tool to adjust the stand, but you only rarely need to use it otherwise.


4

It depends on the reason for them not being true. A lack of equal tension in the spokes could mean weakness in one (or more) of them - and broken spokes are not a good thing to ignore. You can survive one or maybe two for a short while, but eventually the rim could be in danger of collapsing. If you have rim brakes then left-right could mean mismatched ...


4

Generally, repeated issues with broken spokes indicates either damage to the rim, meaning that the metal hoop of the rim is physically bent while under no tension, or that the spokes are at the end of their fatigue life. Any wheel has an expected use life, and usually, you will wear a track in the aluminum rim from braking forces before the fatigue life of ...


4

The biggest functional reason actually would be chain line. You could make the hub shell wider, and run an offset dropout to allow the space for the gears, but then you would have to run a similar offset on the bottom bracket to maintain a usable chain line. Running the offset on the bottom bracket would affect Q factor positioning on many riders, and ...


4

You rim should be centered over your hub. If you are using the tool correctly, and the rim is not centered, it should be redished. If you are not confident in your abilities and knowledge on the subject, get a second opinion from your LBS mechanic before you make changes to the wheel. Sometimes, those kind of changes are difficult to reverse.


4

It's (a lot) harder to achieve in-out motion than side-to-side, and generally requires (much) more that 1/2 turn adjustments. Plus you must usually loosen spokes on either side (2-4 spokes away) of a high spot, or tighten spoken on either side of a low spot. For low spots sometimes you need to tighten ALL the spokes except those over the spot. But at some ...


4

If the adjacent spokes with different tension are on the same side of the wheel, then you could, to a certain amount, release the tension from the tight one and tighten the loose one. If they are each on one side of the wheel, you could not even the tesion without untruing the wheel, and that means your rim is not intrinsically true. If the rim is not ...


4

For reference, I used to work for Velomax Wheels, and Easton Wheels. You may want to back all of the spokes off an equal amount, say 5 or 10 turns. This will give you a little bit of room for adjustment, without having to completely detention the entire wheel. There is a book called "the Bicycle Wheel", by Jobst Brandt, that does a great job of walking ...


4

As has been mentioned in the comments, you should take it to a shop. You're likely to do more harm than good if you're not already experienced in at least truing and preferably building wheels. It also might not even take a couple hundred miles. I'd probably check on it once a week or even every couple days. Feel the spokes. Once it gets to a point where ...


4

If its just one spoke, and you are after functional, not perfection, all you would need it a spoke wrench. If its the right hand side of the rear wheel, you will need to remove the cluster so need tools for that. Tourers often/usually carry spare spokes and can replace them on the side of the road if needed, so you don't need all the gear the LBS has ...


4

If the wheel is symmetrical the spokes should all have the same tension. If dished (what you've called "skew" the bicycle world called dished), the side closer to the centre of the hub will have more tension. All the spokes on the same side of the wheel should have the same tension. Since you have derailleur gears the wheel will almost certainly be dished ...


3

At first I read you to mean an off-center wheel plane, but not so. Interesting question, i.e. does a bike remain stable/rideable if rear axle is not symetrical? I guess yes, as long as front/rear wheels are in line, but practical clearance issues immediately become apparent. Tolerances in modern frames and wheel-drivetrain designs already nearly max out ...


3

The answer depends on the reason for the "hop" and your desire for perfection. A wheel which is out of round due to incorrect spoke tension, rather than impact damage to the rim, will have no trouble being repaired, even with far greater than 3-4mm of deviation by detensioning all the spokes, and re-tensioning them evenly, essentially re-building the ...


3

Are the sidewalls of the Shimanos worn to the point that the actual wear is what is degrading the true? One problem that comes to mind is if they have sufficient wear the inability for the tube to stabilize in the rim itself could perpetually un-true the rim, and it may have nothing to do with the spokes.


3

I think that the more expensive one would be worth it in the long run. The home one looks like it's made from a much lighter material so would be more likely to get damaged in the house (moving....). If you end up buying the home one twice because of damage the pro one would have survived then you didn't really save any money. It's also much easier to work ...


3

For your wheel, you'll want to get spokes cut to the length of your wheel by a local bike shop. The length depends on the rim size, the hub size, and the spoke pattern, so the best way to do this is to bring the wheel in yourself. Bringing the wheel in will also help the mechanics to tell you if it is beyond repair - once wheels have bent more than an inch ...


3

I can't find a current reference or photo, but we used to have one at my previous shop. If I remember correctly it was manufactured by J.A. Stein, but that may be wrong. It was a professionally made copy of a popular homemade wheel building tool. It was called a Stress Relief Box. It consisted of a 6 inch deep box, about 3 inches wider than a 700c rim. ...


3

Don't cut corners or your new wheels won't last as long as they could, or worse, they might not last at all. There are entire books written on truing bicycle wheels. Before you attempt to maintain your wheels yourself, without the shop, read those books, buy a good truing stand, and even then, practice on wheels you don't care about. There is an art to it.



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