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6

First off, the number one cause of broken spokes is not enough tension. When spokes aren't tight enough they load and unload with each revolution of the wheel – basically they are getting bent back and forth each time they go around. Over time they break, just like bending a paperclip. The most likely place for the spokes to break are at the bend at the hub. ...


3

Please do not write in and tell me not to install the wheels - I agonized over this so long, and am only doing it as a last resort. I know you don’t want to hear this, but at least for children there has been a trend in recent years to skip training wheels completly. It just leads to children trusting in them and never learning to balance. Where did you ...


3

What you want for road use is slick tires -- tread and knobs are bad for road use. You have 26" (ISO 559) rims, so you need 26 x (something) tires where (something) is a number in decimal form (e.g. 1.75). Going for smaller tires will lower the bike a bit, and smaller tires have to be run at higher pressure (so you'll get less cushioning). There will also ...


2

YOU SHOULD HAVE CHECKED BEFORE BUYING THE WHEELS! 10-speed Dura-Ace is not compatible with other cassettes. You can install a 8 speed cassette on other Shimano 10-speed compatible hubs. Edit: Reading the question again, of course you can keep the 10 speed cassette. Just replace the shifters, rear derailleur and chain with 10-speed ones and be prepared to ...


2

As far as I know, these are the only possible consequences: Your tire may rub on your frame. You might have trouble getting your brakes to work (assuming you have rim brakes). Your bike might run a bit sideways if your rear wheel is not centered on the frame. This isn't a real problem, but it can be somewhat annoying.


2

Exact same problem here. Same bike. I got it off finally by just turning really really hard using a non-torque wrench. Make sure it's rotated so that the two dots are UP (12 o'clock). If installed correctly the lock should be at 12 o'clock when wheels are on the ground. So if you installed it in the wrong orientation (i.e. lock at 2 o'clock or 9 o'clock ...


2

This probably sounds completely non-helpful, but you'll know you don't need the training wheels when you're no longer using the training wheels. I'm sure you're probably tired of the non-helpful "don't use training wheels" as well... here's the problem with training wheels. Any two wheel, in-line vehicle (i.e., bicycle, motorcycle) is balanced and steered ...


2

By "cosset" you probably mean "cassette". It's a type of rear hub construction and is the norm for modern bikes. Freewheels were used in older bikes. Wheel spacing is the distance between rear dropouts, ie the width of the hub that fit in the rear fork. If you can manage it, the easiest way to answer all the questions by bike shops is to take the frame ...


1

So, I'm thinking that this is a bike that was originally setup with an 8-speed drive train. At some point the previous owner replaced the rear wheel with one built around a 10-speed hub. If I'm reading Sheldon Brown's page on hub and cluster compatibility correctly you should be able to mount an 8-speed cassette on a 10-speed free hub body. So it seems like ...


1

Very generally speaking, the number of cogs on the cassette needs to match the number of clicks in the shifter. If your shifter clicks through 9 gears then you need a 9 speed cassette. If it has 8 clicks as yours does then you need an 8 speed cassette. If you want to switch to 10 speeds then at a bare minimum you'd need new 10 speed shifters and quite likely ...


1

That is technically not a mtn bike. The width is not published on the site and as it is a hybrid it could be a few widths. Take the bike or wheel to the shop. If you no longer have the wheel then take the bike. You should have saved the wheel if for nothing more than I need one of these. Even if it is a freewheel you may want to go freehub if you get a ...


1

How much clearance do you have on the front wheel? Doesn’t look like you can fit much more than 25mm width there. With your weight and luggage I’d go as wide as possible. Maybe 25mm in the front and 28mm in the back (if the brake has enough clearance). Of course it also depends on the quality of the roads.


1

It is possible. For typical mountain rims, the low limit is somewhere around 28mm. Some differences from mounting narrower tires are following: Less cushioning from tires: Smaller tires can not absorb as much shock from from curbs, cracks in the pavement, etc. On the other hand, smaller tires can be made with more flexible casing and absorb small ...


1

It's a fairly generic, machine built wheelset with Bontrager branding. They're almost certainly OEM which means you won't be able to by a replacement set. Most likely Alex or similar rims. As you noticed, they're not the lightest wheels out there. A set such as this would typically retail for well under $300. The Shimano R501 or Mavic Aksium One are both ...


1

According to Trek's website : Wheels: Alloy hubs w/Bontrager Approved alloy rims And according to Bikeradar's website : Front Wheel Weight: 1370g Rear Wheel Weight: 1970g I fear that you won't be able to replace the wheel with exactly the same thing since they seem to be generic wheels built for this bike. You can try the dealer you bought ...


1

Am assuming you have the Bontrager AT-650? That is the current wheel set from what I can see. You should theoretically be able to go down all the way to 23mm on those, as from what I've been able to see the rim width should be ~19mm. If you would want to is a different matter. Super skinny tires on a hybrid/mountain bike just seems off to me. When I ...


1

I kind of doubt it. The hub will still be 10-speed and I'm pretty sure that a 10-speed cassette is wider than a 7, so you won't get back all of the width (in fact I'm not sure you'll get any of it back). Even if you got some back, putting it into a 126 mm frame likely means that the wheel would be "over dished" (there would be a poor bracing angle on the ...


1

Tsunoda are/were a mass manufacturer in Japan somewhat similar to Schwinn in the USA. Most of the bikes they produced were low end though they did make some mid-to-upper end models (I once had a Tsunoda made Lotus branded frame from the early 80s). I believe the brand is still around in the Japanese market but now mostly making folding bikes. Your bike ...



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