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2

The quick release lever is standard and you should just be able to pick one up second hand or from your local bike shop. Make sure you get the one for the front and not for the rear.


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Start by checking the tension on the spokes of your wheel. To do this you'll need a spoke wrench that fits your spokes. There are lots of fancy tools for the job, but all you have to have is the spoke wrench. Within reason, the tighter the better. Ideally what you will have is even tension on all of the spokes on one side of the wheel. There are fancy ...


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It looks like the washer in your photo may be a "Wedge-Lock" washer like those available here: http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-washers/=xhptlp They appear to sell under the names "Heico-Lock" & "Nord-Lock". This may be a UK source: http://uk.rs-online.com/web/c/fasteners-fixings/nuts-washers/locking-anti-vibration-washers/ I should note that there ...


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Am assuming you have the Bontrager AT-650? That is the current wheel set from what I can see. You should theoretically be able to go down all the way to 23mm on those, as from what I've been able to see the rim width should be ~19mm. If you would want to is a different matter. Super skinny tires on a hybrid/mountain bike just seems off to me. When I ...


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I kind of doubt it. The hub will still be 10-speed and I'm pretty sure that a 10-speed cassette is wider than a 7, so you won't get back all of the width (in fact I'm not sure you'll get any of it back). Even if you got some back, putting it into a 126 mm frame likely means that the wheel would be "over dished" (there would be a poor bracing angle on the ...


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Tsunoda are/were a mass manufacturer in Japan somewhat similar to Schwinn in the USA. Most of the bikes they produced were low end though they did make some mid-to-upper end models (I once had a Tsunoda made Lotus branded frame from the early 80s). I believe the brand is still around in the Japanese market but now mostly making folding bikes. Your bike ...


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The only way to really prevent buckling or taco-ing from happening is to avoid impacting potholes, curbs or other tall edges. If avoidance is impossible, try to shift weight off the wheel by leaning more forwards or back. You can get beefier wheels with a higher spoke count to add strength to help absorb the blows. Alternately you should purchase a ...


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The way I approach this is to equalize the tension by sound (my ear is terrible so I use an app for the iPhone called Spoke Tension Meter). I start by picking an average tension and adjusting all of the spokes towards that tension. That usually throws the wheel out of true. Then I go around retruing the wheel checking tensions as I go – aiming for a true ...


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You're thinking about this from the wrong side of the cassette. All cassettes end at roughly the same point or the lockring wouldn't engage correctly. The spacers are to make sure there is significant compression, but because the cassette is still in the same spot relative to the drive side of the wheel the chainline shouldn't change. That said you might ...



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