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6

As usual, Sheldon's got the answers. ISO 622 is the unambiguous way of referring to the following rim sizes: 700c (you see this marketing on road, hybrids; this is from the French system; the c is often dropped, but there are rare a,b sizes) 29"x decimal (you see this on mountain bikes; usually only applied to wide rims) 28"x decimal (particularly in ...


6

I have to say I think this is a myth, for a properly built wheel. Spokes have threaded ends which the nipples screw onto. Like almost all screw threads, they are self-locking. Since the spokes of a properly built wheel are under a high level of tension, there is no "play" in the threads. In addition, any torque would have to overcome the high clamping force ...


4

It could well be a nipple. Or some other bit of metal junk. Removing it is a good idea, just because you never want your bike to make metallic rattling noises as part of normal operation. Over a long time, and lots of wheeling your bike, the repeated banging of that object against the rim will damage it somewhat, but I expect you'd have to wheel it thousands ...


4

Different wheel sizes have different advantages/disadvantages. Larger wheels tend to roll over obstacles better (more comfort), and be more efficient once up to speed. Smaller wheels (generally lighter) are easier to spin up to speed, more maneuverable for highly technical terrain and often thought of as stronger (owing to shorter spoke lengths). While it'...


4

The answer is yes, a slightly narrower tyre will be fine. If you read the metric numbers off the tyre you're safer, because those have a fixed meaning. Inch sizes depend on the exact context (a 27" road tyre will be too big for a 29" mountain bike rim, for example). You probably have a 45-406 tyre, and are looking at a 35-406 tyre. The "406" part says it ...


3

As you ride, your wheel deforms slightly. This allows the spokes to vary in tension over the course of a revolution. If the nipple threads have play in them, then this cyclic weighting and unweighting allows the nipples to move. You may be suffering from low spoke tension over the whole wheel. Spokes twist when the nipple is tightened, which may result ...


2

If the problem happened to me and the noise sounded like it came from the hub, then I would start dismantling the hub to find out what's rattling. Hopefully just removing the quick-release skewer would reveal the problem, if the problem is in the hub. If the sound appeared to come from the rim, then I'd take the tire off and remove the inner tube (assuming ...


2

In terms of tire size, your practical choices on new bikes are between (a) 700c, (b) what's called 27.5 inch (or French 650b), and (c) conventional 26 inch. These are ISO sizes 622, 584, and 559, respectively, where the ISO size is the actual diameter of the rim in mm (whereas most other size numbers are plucked from someone's posterior and have no relation ...


1

We did this in 1996 with a differential mechanism and by nullifying the torque at the steering. It was quite successful with various advantages like easy drive the sandy road / muddy / loose gravel without skidding, and no skidding of bike by turning the steering at max of 90 degree even at high speed. The bike was designed to take different speed ...



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