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13

If your question is, "Can an amateur successfully true a wheel on their first try?", the answer is "Yes". A quick search on the internet reveals plenty of videos explaining the process. Some things to consider: Make sure you fully understand the process before you start Don't use excessive force and take your time Use a spoke wrench Make small ...


6

The part of the rim you're talking about is a brake track or braking surface (the silver colored thing in this picture): which is where the rim brake is supposed to make contact with. These are a part of a particular rim's design and are not available to be added after market. You should check that your rim is indeed intended for rim brakes (not all ...


6

Those strings are quite common with continental tires and seem to be a part of their manufacturing process. Every continental tire I have owned seem to have some of those threads, even ones that mounted relatively easily. I just cut them off and have never had an issue with them. Continental tires are also well known for their tight beads. The high-pressure ...


5

Yes you could try truing yourself, but also yes you could "destroy the whole thing"! Well, not destroy it, but end up with a wheel more out of true and maybe some damaged spokes. Out of any repair on a bike this one is one you need to get your head round first and take your time on. Don't let that put you off, just take it slowly and carefully and it should ...


3

I was going to boldly say "no-one has made a rear hub dynamo" but then I did a google search and I'm glad I didn't say that, because I would have been wrong. Shimano make the FH-C810 which despite the FH suggesting "front hub" is actually short for "freehub". In full it's the "Shimano Nexave Di2 FH-C810" (page via searching their site for the short code). ...


3

The hardest to fit tyres I've ever dealt with were continental comfort contact (and I run marathon plus which are reputed to be difficult). Like yours they needed serious overpressure to seat, even after wetting the rim. After several years fitted they're still going strong. I had to change a tube in one recently and it was much easier but still hard to ...


2

Just to expand on @Batman's excellent answer... Rims properly designed for rim brakes will have sufficient thickness of material to withstand wear from the pads. It's not uncommon for track/street rims to be 'unmachined' like yours. Most of the time the downside will simply be dirt / paint wear as you have experienced, but bear in mind that many deep rims ...


1

In my experience, the most silent combination has been Shimano freehub and cheap cassette with pinned together cogs. The one I have is XT, but road hubs below Dura-Ace have similar mechanism. A cassette with loose cogs can vibrate more freely and is louder. Other brands that I have been riding myself or have had the joy of listening on group rides include ...


1

Not a full answer, but using an answer block instead of a comment as the bits in the comments can get lost quickly and your question is generating a good number of comments. Read Daniel R. Hicks' comments on good and correct sized spoke wrenches. This is key, you will think they all fit correctly, you want the smallest one that fits or you will strip your ...


1

Old thread, but here's my take on the question: the answer is an emphatic NO. My LBS suggested deep-vs (32 spoke) for my Giant Defy Advanced 1 two years ago when I kept breaking spokes on the stock Giant wheels. I was just too heavy (260 lbs.) for those wheels. The deep-vs have been bombproof. No deflection in 2 years and 3,000 miles of riding. I was ...



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