Hot answers tagged

10

I doubt the janitor could unintentionally damage the wheel with the mop by impact -- you don't use much force when mopping, and it would likely just turn the wheel or shift the bike a bit if it was hit. If someone drove their boots into the wheel or something, that could cause damage. One concern is the chemicals used in the mopping. Certain chemicals ...


6

Let all the air out and work your hands around the tire, "breaking" the tire edge from the rim where it has stuck. Go around twice doing this. Then reinflate slowly, checking every few pumps to see if the tire is properly centered. If not, work it back to the center with your hands. Pay particular attention to the part of the tire right next to the rim ...


5

The correct tire pressure for you is typically not whats written on the tire sidewall. That's an arbitrary number determined by the marketing and legal departments at the tire manufacturer, not the engineers (usually it leads to an overinflated tire, which can damage the wheel and reduce control of the bike). You'll have to play with the pressure to get a ...


4

It's quite unlikely. The axle length (hub spacing) will probably be rather different. Here's a list of axle lengths. The same page also discusses how you might get away with it on a steel frame with quite a lot of effort. Then you get onto the wheel building, which isn't easy and had to be good for electric wheels with their greater stresses. The 26" ...


4

These stands don't hold the bike very well because if the friction grip fails, the bike can roll/move backwards and then fall over as the steering turns. So, consider backing your bike into one instead of going in frontwards. Downside as ChrisH says is that your lock needs to go from the rack all the way to the front wheel, or use two locks. Also check ...


4

If your bike is like those pictured then it's highly unlikely unless the wheel gets hit or leant on from the side. That in itself is not implausible in a crowded bike rack. Lightweight road bike wheels are another matter, they have much less lateral strength. Even they would need some sort of sideways force but much less. The big problem with these racks ...


4

It's really simple, gravity/weight moves you forward, and drag/friction keeps you from going fast. He can't do much about the weight difference, short of drinking more beer or getting a heavier bike. But drag and friction is a different story. There are many things slowing you and your buddy down, the largest factor being wind resistance. Wind resistance ...


4

You don't need the nut, really (and its rather abnormal on Schrader valve tube) -- a lot of people just throw it away. The point of the nut is so that the tube's stem doesn't go into the rim when you're trying to inflate the tube and the stem doesn't move around when you're trying to pump the tire. Note that the tube can only go significantly into the rim ...


4

If the wheel fits..... If you have been using it, then no, you won't have problems. Its not that uncommon for people to shoe horn a 27.5" wheel into a 26 fork or frame. just running a front wheel will slightly change the bikes geometry, but not enough to make a big difference. Where you can run into trouble is if clearances are not enough and you ride in ...


3

If you use your bike everyday, i would say you need to whack some air in every couple of weeks. If you have left it sitting for a few weeks, it will need air. Most tyres have a pressure rating on the side- find yours and use it if you can. You'll be amazed at how much faster it will feel, and its also safer in terms of handling.


3

From an aerodynamic perspective the biggest aero gains come from the front wheel set-up as it is the leading edge breaking the clean air. The rear wheel runs in the "dirty" air so aerodynamics gains will be smaller.


3

As stated in the other answer, the driving force behind these setups used to budget. The rear wheel is fixed gear, which limits the budget selection to old track wheels, converted freewheel wheels and self-built. Two first are high spoke count because that was all that existed back in the day, and easily available components for self-building are of the high ...


3

Is there a bike co-op in your city? When I ran around on a ratbike like that, it was because I just got whatever people had laying around and stuck it together as cheaply as possible, usually with no thought about anything other than what was directly in front of me at the time. I needed a wheel that would roll, and once I put it on, I didn't think about it ...


2

I agree with Batman's answer and would add to it that weekly pressure checking may not be enough depending on your setup and riding goals. I can get away with a weekly topping off of my tubes under 28mm conti road tires that I'll run at 100psi. If it's snowing/raining/whatever and I decide to run them at 80psi, they will be too soft after a week. I ...


2

Another point to consider - confidence. I had a washout on a road, which lead to a slide on a downhill ~4 months ago, which ended up off the road and down a hill. I am now much more leery of turns at speed, to the point I brake down to a slow speed and coast through any leaning part of the curve, only applying pedals again when exiting the corner. So, ...


2

ANSWER No. Your bike has a 700 wheel. A 26" wheel is too small for your frame and so the brakes won't reach the rim. I doubt you'll get a decent kit for $400, the lowest I'm aware of is $500 and has a pretty small battery - http://www.electric-bike-kit.com/hill-topper.aspx A hub wheel kit might just be a hub motor, with spokes, and ...


1

I loosely tighten before inflation- just to stop the valve from disappearing whilst inflating it. After inflation, it needs to be finger tight- else it will rattle on the rim. This is probably the number one reason why most people don't use them- the slightest looseness here will be very noisy (especially to deeper section wheels).


1

There are several different 18" sizes, and several different 16" sizes. See Sheldon Brown's tire sizing page If the 18" is the 355mm used by Birdy, and the 16" is the 349mm used by Brompton, that's close enough that it might be possible. People have converted Birdys from 18" to narrower 20" (406mm) by moving the brake posts (see "brakeboss relocator"). I ...


1

Unless the bike was specifically designed for a wheel size conversion, like the 18/20 Prodigy from Hoffman in 2003 or so, changing the wheel size is generally not a safe and practical option. Brake mount positions and tire clearance to the frame prevent it.


1

The 700c wheels you have correspond to an inch measure of 27" to 29", depending on tire thickness. The 23 on the tire refers to the tire width, in millimeters, indicating that these are skinny road tires. Never mind wheel size including tire, though, the critical measure is the rim diameter. 700c road bike wheels have a 622 mm diameter. Wheels under the 26" ...



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