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28

In my experience, a front rim is symmetrical, and it doesn't matter which direction it's in. Unlike the rear wheel, where there's a drivetrain side and a non-drivetrain side, the only place where the quick-release handle can be. However, there are some other considerations to keep in mind: Tires will sometimes have a tread direction. This is usually marked ...


14

Although this is purely anecdotal, I know from my own experience mountain biking that most of my flats were from so-called "pinch flats" (where the tube is pierced by pinching or friction with the tire/rim rather than piercing by an external object). This was highly annoying. After having switched to tubeless some years ago, I've not yet had a single flat. ...


14

The "Lunartic Cycle" Here you go: http://www.yankodesign.com/2010/08/13/no-spokes-cycle/ Complete with movie. As for your extra reading material: http://bicycledesign.net/ Hope that helps!


14

The increased weight of the larger wheel (if indeed it does increase) will of course add weight to the bike, but additional weight adds very little rolling resistance (though it does of course affect hill climbing). It is a myth that "rotating mass slows you down". In terms of top speed there's no difference between weight on the wheel rim and weight ...


13

Depends on how "little" the accident was. First double-check that the handlebar really is "square" to the fork, and not slightly cocked one direction or the other. (Though this problem shouldn't cause the wheel to turn when you let go.) Next, oddly enough, do the same check with your seat. If the seat is slightly angled to one side or the other then it ...


13

I believe what you're describing is the "Rim Tape". The rim tape covers up the holes in the rim (wheel) that the spokes attach through. Without that tape covering the holes, the innertube (air chamber) will be exposed to holes and sharp surfaces that are likely to cause another flat tire. If the rim tape is torn in one spot, but still covering all of those ...


13

With a traditional non-through axle, there's a slot at the bottom of the fork (or the dropouts), the axle is hollow, and there is a skewer through axle. You use the quick-release to loosen the grip around that slot to slide the skewer (vertically) in and out of that slot, while it's still going through the wheel. With a through axle, there is simply a hole ...


12

As mentioned try a blunt bladed instrument (A large flat blade screwdriver will do) to pry the pads back in. Just put the screwdriver between the pads and lever the pads apart evenly! Just be carful though as sometimes the pistons that push the pads out can come out too far resulting in the pistons being slighly out of line, however if the pads have plenty ...


12

There are four main possibilities, depending on the quality and age of bike. The most likely scenario is that the wheel is a traditional kid's coaster brake wheel - one gear forward, pedal backwards to brake. In that case it's likely that the clutch is slipping inside the hub. A replacement wheel is probably an easy find, even more so than replacement ...


12

Many bike shops, collectors, or racers hang their bicycles by the wheels. The wheels are made to withstand the weight of the rider while going through road bumps. The forces of a hanging bicycle are way less than anything the wheels are designed for. Some very deep aerodynamic rims (say, Campa Bora) might require some special hook with a wider seat. ...


12

It is normal for a wheel to have an initial break in period. As you ride the bike, each spoke has its load released, and retensioned each time it passes around the bottom of the wheel. Since some parts of the wheel are aluminum, and others are steel, the aluminum parts compress. This means that the spokes are not under as much tension as they need to be. ...


12

This is a common problem, but really not a big deal. I've usually heard it called "toe overlap". I have it on all my bikes. Basically, it's a bit shocking the first time it happens, but you get used to it. It's no big deal. If you're simply aware that it can happen at slow speeds, you'll avoid it easily enough. Since it can only happen at slow speeds, it's ...


11

You will need one special tool: a spoke wrench that fits the size of spokes you have. While a truing stand is great, you can do some basic truing of a bike with rim brake by simply putting the bike on a stand. Spin the wheel slowly and watch the space between the rim and the brake pad. When you have found the center of a an area that is listing to one ...


11

I had a similar problem on my Pugsley, though it was under braking (discs) that I was kicking the wheel around in the dropouts. After talking with the guys at my LBS, I learned that I wasn't putting enough force into the quick release. They said that a good, tight, clamp should leave an imprint of the lever on your palm when you close it. It will be ...


10

I had the same issues riding on pre-built 26" mountain bike wheels. I'm 6'5" and weigh ~400lbs, so I break stuff left and right (including frame welds). I have found two things that broke my wheel-breaking streak. The first thing I found was the Surly Pugsley and the Endomorph (or Larry) tires that fit on it. The 26"x4" tires are massive, and absorb any ...


10

Regarding road bikes, the 29" rim size is actually the same as standard 700c wheels used on road bikes -- only the tire is different (larger). One difference that I don't see mentioned often is that 29" vs 26" wheels change your effective gearing. If you have two bikes with the same gearing but one with 29" wheels and one with 26", the larger wheel will ...


10

Generally the QR lever on the rear tire is on the left, so as to not interfere with the derailer. It makes (a little) sense to put the QR lever of the front tire on the same side (at least if you have any OCD tendencies). But it basically doesn't matter, so long as the tire has no preferred rotation direction (and you don't have something like disk brakes ...


10

700CX14GX36H means it's a: 700c rim (actually ISO 622mm diameter, as the Sheldon Brown page linked by Brad describes) taking 14 gauge spokes with 36 spoke holes So, you need to know the 700c bit if you're buying tyres or tubes, you need to know the 14g bit if you're replacing spokes, and you need to know the 36H bit if you're re-lacing the rim to a new ...


10

You might want to take a look a this question which discusses the advantages of 29" over 26". 650b (or 27.5") falls somewhere in the middle and therefore performance characteristics will be somewhere in the middle of the two. For instance, 650b would be faster than 26" but slower than 29" at same chainring/cog. It would also roll over obstacles easier ...


10

This kind of failure is typically caused by excessive wear on the brake surface of the rim. Every time you apply your brakes, you are polishing small amounts of metal away from the rim. Eventually, the rim gets too thin and weak, and will crack, like you have seen in your photo, from the normal inflation pressure of the tire. In general, this means tht ...


9

There are a couple of types of rim tape available: Cloth - This has a glue backing and is very long lasting. If you need to replace a spoke nipple, depending on the age of the tape, you will most probably have to also replace the tape since it will no longer stick to the rim. Rubber - This is continuous loop of rubber (stretchy) and the stretch is what ...


9

I'm not sure if you intend to replace the axles themselves, but AFAIK, most nutted axles are not hollow, which means they can't accommodate QR skewers. If this is true in your case, you will need to replace the axles outright in order to use QR skewers. QR axles for modern hubs do come in a few "standard" sizes, but you will nevertheless want to measure the ...


9

There is a part on the hub of the wheel called the Freehub. This is a ratchet mechanism which allows your bike to freewheel, or move forward, even when you are not pedaling. This is different from Fixed gear bikes, which have no freewheel mechanism, and will force your pedals around, as long as the wheels are moving. The noise you are hearing is the pawls, ...


9

A wheel is only as strong as the tension on the spokes. If the wheel was loose for any significant length of time before you noticed it, the spokes will fatigue very quickly, because they are flexing through a range of motion which is not intended. You are a big guy at 95 Kg, so this type of problem is not unusual (as am I). That means that you need to be ...


9

I'd actually lean toward a shallower rim, but the important bits are going with a high spoke count and either 3x or 4x pattern (both drive and non-drive sides). With a deeper rim, you are changing the angle in the cross patterns and reducing the length. This means that the spoke has to deflect more to handle the cross. This is more noticeable with really ...


9

I don't think so - I've ridden over 1/4 mile stretches of freshly poured asphalt with no apparent damage to my tires. The asphalt is around 300 degrees F when it leaves the plant, but it will have cooled to 200 degrees or less by the time it's open to traffic (water will stand on the surface without boiling, so it's definitely below 212F) Further, unless ...


8

The TS-2 is what I use and I quite like it. 3 of them are 17 years old and we just purchased a brand new one. Of course everyone likes the older ones ... hah. Anyways, in my opinion you do not NEED to buy the more expensive one. If you are truing 10+ wheels a day, yes you need it (in my opinion). For home mechanic work, the TS-8 is just fine.


8

If you're doing mostly commuting I'd look for strength above light. Go for something with more spokes and with a 3 cross lacing pattern. You want something that is reliable. Of course you weight is a consideration so there is always a trade off between that and durability. Going with something with radial (straight) lacing up front can save weight and ...


8

Clinchers Pros cheaper more common wheels are more common easier to patch on the road, no need for gluing, stretching tire, etc Cons if you flat, you can't really ride on it some say a lower quality ride will always be heavier (tube, tire, clincher interface) Tubulars Pros the lightest practical tubulars will always be lighter than the lightest ...



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