Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Both kinds of bearings are equally good for wheel hubs. Because of ease of replacing traditional loose balls bearing with standard tools, I would always go with those but recently I've got a set of new wheels with cartridge bearings only because I liked the wheels (and the price) and because I'm curious about how they will hold. Considering the length of ...


0

The tools are relatively expensive compared to cone wrenches, but all cartridge bearings can be replaced if needed. http://www.enduroforkseals.com/id176.html You need both a puller and a press of some kind. Cartridge bearings last a very long time with no maintenance at all. Since installing fancy ceramic bearings is part of high end road cycling ...


0

Most hubs these days claim to be "sealed". This basically means that if you look the hub from the axle end you can't see the balls of the ball bearings, because there is, at least, a "dust shield" that leaves only a very narrow opening between rotating hub and fixed axle. There are also "cartridge" hubs, which were the original sealed hubs popularized by ...


1

Using an axle much smaller than the hole it fits into is sure to end badly. However, you can make up the difference with a sleeve bushing. Maybe you can find a standard size bushing that fits well, or maybe you'll need to invent one e.g. from copper plumbing pipe. If you want to try the pipe approach, use 3/8" copper surrounded by 1/2" copper and you ...


2

I recently did some extra analysis on the modelling referred to in my previous answer, this time using a realistic power output curve for accelerations from a standing start and from two rolling start scenarios, instead of the assumed flat 1000W used in the earlier model. The full link is here: ...


1

I have come across a web site called Velosolo which offers conversion kits (cogs, spacers, chain tensioners if necessary), especially when going from a geared wheel. Perhaps something on there will suit? That site also has a decent FAQ which might help you identify some of the issues, although by the sounds of things you're already quite clued up.


2

The Steamroller has 120mm spacing (i.e. track hub spacing) in the back (based on the 2011 Surly complete catalog). A modern road hub is 130 mm spacing. My recommendation is to buy a wheel with a 120 mm track hub on it and thread the cog on it -- you could spread (i.e. cold set) the frame in principle (spreading can be done if and only if the frame is ...


2

Wheels are an easy upgrade to make as you can put them on your bike immediately with little mechanical hassle. There are many factors related to a wheel's performance, but the one that makes the greatest difference to energy/power demand, speed and accelerations is aerodynamics. Hence why one of the most popular upgrades is to wheels with better aerodynamic ...


1

Right about the time fat bikes were about to become popular, I put a 26x4" front tire (which has the same diameter as a 29x2" tire) on a 26" bike, without changing anything else. The result was similar to a 69er, raising the front hub by about an inch. Besides improving handling on descents (perhaps due in part to the wider tire), it really didn't affect ...


3

I've been riding a 26 back, 27.5 front for about 4 years now. It works great for me. It does significantly change the geometry of the bike, but that is exactly what I wanted. I had a relatively upright XC bike and the change in geometry gave me a slacker headtube and longer wheelbase. This does make the bike less of a capable climber, but it's a much nicer ...


2

This is definitely possible and some years ago, the combination of a 26" rear wheel and a 29" front wheel was somewhat popular (though still far from mainstream) in the MTB scene. These bikes are sometimes referred to as 69ers. Combining a 27.5" rear wheel (and thus 27.5" frame) with a 29" front wheel (and fork), should be relatively easy. As long as the ...


4

Technically it can be done. Different wheel sizes were used over the years, starting from late 1980s in some niche touring bikes, where front wheel was significantly smaller than the rear one. Mountain bikers have used a setup of 26" wheel at the front and 24" at the back, especially for downhill (even at World Cup level) at the beginning of this century, ...


1

You can do this and there are even bikes that are designed to do so, for example this bike here by a company called Liteville. This bike is not only intended to be used with mixed wheel sizes but does also allow to change the wheel sizes used. So why would one want to do so? Without having explicitly searched for reasons, I would guess that one can use the ...


1

You win non-TT bike races by being able to accelerate just that little bit much more than your competition. 99.9% of the time you are riding exactly the same speed as everyone else, what makes the difference between winning and losing is your ability to accelerate just a bit better than your competitors. Humans are very low power engines. Since F = MA, one ...


0

New bikes at the very least require a full check and tune up out of the box. They also need to be "broken in" in many cases. New wheels can go out of true just from being ridden for the first time, one of my favourite things after building a new bike was to ride it around the shop and listen to all the spoke nipples make their "pinging" noises as they ...


1

The issue you are having is the wheel is "out of true". This is caused by uneven spoke tension. It can be adjusted, but it's easy to go wrong here and make it worse if you don't know what you're doing. Most good bikes are bought from bike shops. This allows the shop to properly assemble and adjust the bike. If you know someone who can do it (and ...


1

[My knowledge is not racing-specific, but as they say, any time two bicycles are moving in the same direction, it’s a race.] Hand-built wheels will tend to be stronger and more reliable than machine-built wheels. That is only very loosely true, but the way it was explained to me by an experienced wheelbuilder in a large local shop was that ...


10

Wheels and tires are the interface between the bike and the road; and are the parts that takes the most stress (wear and tear) along with the bottom bracket. (IMO) lighter wheels will reduce the rotation mass (rotation inertia); you will need less energy to make the wheel turn. higher quality bearings in the hub will reduce friction. better aerodynamics in ...


0

I have rented a medium frame hard tail 29er silverback with deore drive train and was not surprised. You guys were right, tight corners were really hard to handle at first, gut some bruises to realize it as well. But later on it became much easier. I was clumsy at first (it was a huge transition from 26"), and I could feel an added weight compared to 26ers. ...


0

A 29er will definitely fit you. I know shorter people who ride 29ers. If the most intricate riding you'll be doing is single track, then I don't think you'll find a 29er to be "sluggish". As Chris said, dh/freeride bikes have smaller wheels, but that's really about your ability to muscle the bike around, and having the wheels be able to withstand more ...



Top 50 recent answers are included