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3

So I finally got lucky and this solution has worked for a few months now. I ended up with a Mavic A719 with Sapim Strong spokes and a spoke freeze as well as the thickest Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyre they could fit on the wheel. It was built by Mamachari Bikes in Dalston, London. I've been having no problems with it since a few months now. I think using the ...


1

I don't know if department stores like Walmart carry Presta tubes. You had a Presta and need to replace it with a Presta. The size you need is 700x35 or 27x1 3/8. I like thorn resistant tubes. They are heavier and more expensive but will usually go 10 times further without a flat.


2

You probably have a different offset and a different fork height now, so whatever you do, you have already messed with the geo noticeably. Borrow a 27.5 and a 26 front wheel from a friend for a day, go ride, figure out which one feels better. I would guess 26 would feel closer to how it used to but it should still handle differently due to the different ...


2

Theoretically, the smaller the number - the higher up the Fulcrum series. Fulcrum produce OEM wheels for manufacturers and these are supplied to manufacturers with "even" numbers which do not appear on the manufacturer's site. The number falling between the official numbering series usually indicates the wheel being an amalgamation of wheel series. This ...


1

That's an interesting wheel - I'm guessing its an 80s racing front wheel, - or its designed to look like one - because of the low spoke count and the large flange hub. Most wheels have cup and cones to hold ball bearings. Yours has sealed cartridge bearings instead, so its like roller blades or skateboards. I'd lay the wheel on its side, support the nut ...


6

The wheel has sealed bearing that are pressed into the hub. Your axle is likely being held in by the bearings. The axle has flanges on the inside that the bearing is resting against. You can try tapping on the end of the axle with a soft faced hammer or even a block of wood. This should dislodge the bearing from the hub. This will also damage the bearing. I ...


-1

The wheel diameter has no bearing on the tyre width. Numbers like 26", 27.5", 29" are related to the wheel diameter - how far it rolls per revolution. Numbers like 1.5",4" are the tyre width. Not all tyre widths are compatible with all wheel rims or all frames, so you need to look at the rim width and frame clearance.


4

I'll venture a guess that currently there are two lines defining the "plus" range you are talking about. Anything under 2.75 to 3 inches will likely be defined as a regular MTB tire. These were often called "fat tires" until Surly popularized the Endomorph, which made the term "fat tire" fall out of favor for regular mountain bike tires. The original ...



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