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1

Wheels generally come in a cardboard box with plastic caps over the hub ends to protect them and a bit of other padding (for skewers and the like) added in. Your LBS may have a few of these laying around for whatever size wheel you are sending back. They may even be willing to do the package job for you and save you a bit of time for a reasonable amount of ...


5

They make rubberized hooks designed to accommodate fat bike tires that are 5+ inches wide. You can probably buy them from a home improvement store. On a wall you could safely store a single or possible two road wheel sets with one. Hung from a ceiling (as most of mine are) you could store two or maybe more road wheel sets on one. The rubberized coating ...


1

What your bike can handle is usually more a matter of your skill level than it is the bike, at least to a certain point. When you watch mountain bike videos, you will see guys on hardtail "XC bikes" take drops much larger than 2 feet. BUT, they have skill, lots of practice, and likely many broken bikes or bones, or both in their past. Don't worry about ...


4

While I agree that there are no real risks to string your wheels by the rim, there are a number of DIY and commercial wall mounted racks for hanging wheels at the axle. Wheelzrack makes one good option, and even integrates a storage shelf for shoes and helmets. They support up to for sets of wheels, which may be a good option in your case. Feedback sports ...


2

As suggested by this answer, there's really no problem with hanging wheels or even an entire bike up by the rims. It's a good idea to pad the hook to avoid scratches, but this should be easy enough with some cheap foam or even tape. Failing that, a narrow shelf with some blocks either side of each wheel to stop them rolling away would work and take up ...


4

(Presumption the OP is not over about 100kg, even then, I think my answer holds) Don't worry about the bike. It can handle a lot more than you can. For years I rode with no suspension and never broke a bike. I then got, what was then a great fork - 60mm travel, and did not break the bike. I usually pulled out at more than 1 meters air on those bikes.... ...


3

Depends on where/how you purchase them and the quality of the wheel, but generally pre-built wheels need a check-over for appropriate spoke tension/truing out of the box. You can either check this yourself or pay a bike shop to do this for you. You can avoid these checks at your own risk, obviously. But, I wouldn't recommend it, especially if they aren't ...


1

Wheelbuilding machines can be configured for a .1mm precision. But the choice of tolerance is up to the wheel factory. Best machine-built wheels are trued to this maximum of .1mm precision, which is pretty good. Most man-built wheels have a run-out around .5 mm when new. But when you are building your own wheel, or you are fixing it, a tolerance of around 1 ...


0

For a front wheel you need to match size (29") and width (not critical - look at similar tire size), hub (Being cheap its probably 9mmQR but there is also 15mmQR and 20mmQR) and rotor size. The rotor size was probably 160mm, but may have been 180mm (They don't give it in the specs). If you end up with the wrong size on the wheel, its easy to change the ...


2

There are 3 things to worry about and you've covered two. Size, the wheel rim should match the current size. Brake compatibility, if you have disc brakes you need a compatible hub, could be 6 bolt or centerlock. It has to be compatible with the rotor you will also purchase. If you have rim brakes you would purchase a rim brake compatible rim. (you can use ...


0

First: don't try truing a wheel you rely on without experience! If spoke tension is high on the side of the rim deviation, then you can improve the true by adjusting spoke tension. If spoke tension is low on the side of the deviation or the tensions are roughly even, then the rim is bent and trying to fix it with tension will make the tension balance worse. ...


0

For skewers, other than weight and durability, one unmentioned advantage of titanium is its resistance to corrosion. Rusty steel skewers can get stuck inside your hub, forcing expensive replacement which is much less likely with titanium (you should still grease them though).


3

Titanium alloys are typically made of Aluminum and Vanadium: e.g. on a 3AL/2.5V Ti bike Frames for instance there is 3% Aluminum, 2.5% Vanadium and the rest is Titanium. Main benefits of Titanium is no corrosion, immense resistance to fatigue (material failure due to cyclic constraints), and weight indirectly (i.e. stronger material allows to use thinner ...


1

If your wheel is trued (lateral movement) to within 0.5mm it is considered good. Same 0.5mm tolerance for the roundness of the wheel. Just remember that you may need to take the "stress" out of the wheel as the spokes can wind up with the torque applied to the nipple. It is that pinging sound that happens when a freshly built wheel is ridden for first ...


2

Consider you are not finding what you are looking for for a reason. A larger tire does not necessarily have a lower rolling resistance. A the same pressure a larger tire actually has a lower rolling resistance. Over city terrain I would take a 28 mm or 30 mm over a 23 mm for rolling resistance. For ride and flat resistance I would definitely take a ...


-1

You could also be getting some play in the fork (assuming you have a suspension fork). To verify this, put your finger where the stanchion meets the lowers of the fork, lock the front brake and rock the bike back and forth. Every fork I've had has just a little play there. It's not likely that the play in your cassette is related to your front wheel. ...


0

Carbon wheels will have a different sound die to handling vibrations differently than aluminum. Has nothing to do with aerodynamics.


0

I still like these rims very much and purchased another set (A23 OC's) just a couple months ago. They feel like my old racing wheels with the 4000S's. I have made a few minor changes to tire mounting. I use thinner wider tape especially with OC's and I find the worst it gets is when you start the last 18 inches over the rim. For the next few inches I use ...


0

Finally, I've built a bike using rims in question and rode humble 50 km. Here's my experience: Putting Schwalbe One Tubeless was tough as hell, I had to lube everything with dishwashing liquid to drop enough traction, tires sit very tight. Tire doesn't blow off at 100 psi. I didn't pump more that that. It takes two weeks for non-sealed tire to lose all ...


2

The stabilizers are taking too much weight. This can happen if they are mounted too low, or she is leaning too much and transferring weight off the rear wheel. The first problem is easily fixed - the bike should lean slightly to one side or the other. When its held upright with all the weight on the back wheel, the stabilizers should be about 1-2cm off the ...


-2

For me it gets the bike out of the way. I like to hang my bikes, there is no problem with it.


1

The Polar 200 user manual says that the speed sensor and the cycling computer must be no more than 30-40cm apart. The cadence sensor attaches to the frame, near the pedals. You could test how far away the speed sensor will transmit by just moving the computer away from the bike with the front wheel spinning. If it works at 1 meter distance, then putting ...


6

Hub Width On road, mountain, and hybrid, the front hubs are 100mm in width. On road bicycles the rear is typically 130mm, where on a MTB it is typically 135mm. Measure this from your old hub, and DON'T stretch/force a different hub width. Wheel (Rim) Diameter The most typical road rim is a 700c which will mean the bead seat diameter of the rim is 622mm, ...


1

I use 23mm and 21mm tyres on my Mavic Reflex rims. It's fine.


0

Alternative to the other suggestions, repair tube while the wheel is in place, with the break and all. You take one side of the tire off the wheel, pull the tube out and patch it, replace the tube (a bit of air in it makes it easier) and put the tire back. This is a Dutch language video but with very clear pictures, front wheel but rear wheel works the ...


1

Based on your fender/brake setup I think you might benefit from this: http://problemsolversbike.com/products/travel_agents The barrel adjuster (on the silver model) on the top could be tuned to do this with out tools. So that instead of needing a 5mm to release the tension on the cable you could screw in the adjuster and bam, instant slack. Just a ...


1

A shimano noodle can help you. It have a "shortcut" to get it out of the holder.


3

A properly tuned V-Brake system, assembled with proper, compatible components should let you disengage the quick release by just pressing the brake arms together with one hand and wiggling the noodle out. But if it is really necesary to have the cable so tight for the brakes to work, there may be some mismatch in the components or simply bad design. Here ...


0

I have seen a situation where a internal-geared hub is used with a standard rim, and the (large) diameter of the hub results in the spokes approaching the rim at a fairly sharp angle (made worse by this being a 26" bike). This results in excess fatigue at the nipples and resulting spoke breakage there. Not sure how to fix this other than to get a new rim ...



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