Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

To answer your questions first before going into more detail: Yes, this is quite common on road bikes as there isn't a massive amount of clearance between the wheel, tyre and forks. I wouldn't say you have to make the brake pads further apart. Brake pads are generally 2-3mm from the rim on either side. Too close and you'll have extremely sensitive brakes. ...


4

This might sometimes happen. The quick release is usually enough to make the pads wider than the tire, but this doesn't happen in every case. The pads should usually be about 2mm from the rim when everything is set up. If there is not enough room to remove your wheel after the quick release is used, you will have to loosen the cable. You can try doing this ...


1

Everyone that rides a light road bike long enough eventually has this happen to them regardless of the bike. It is terrifying and many people never trust their bike again after that, but it's not the bike. Speed wobbles on a bike are always blamed on the components or frame, but are almost always caused by a harmonic interaction between the rider and ...


0

I've never had a wobble on a bicycle, but have experienced it on a motorcycle a few times. I wouldn't expect uneven spoke tension to cause it, unless you have multiple spokes with near zero tension. The first thing I'd check is if your headset is really loose. On a motorcycle, it's usually a problem on the BACK that causes a wobble. Maybe a REALLY loose ...


0

A stronger and better riding wheel is gained from a more even spoke tension. Might be an idea to take the wheel to a get it re-tensioned. ie. slacking off the tension on the wheel and then re-tensioning and truing. High speed wobble is a bit of an enigma. Given the speed you were travelling - 40mph - the wheel would be spinning at about 500RPM. The ...


4

There is a lot of material online about the causes of speed wobbles, but I haven't seen spoke tension as a common cause. It usually something created by, and stopped by, rider position rather than anything on the bike (I know you didn't want to read that). Just a thought though: wouldn't uneven spoke tension show up in the wheel not being "true"? In any ...


0

Machine-built wheels are known to need re-truing after the first several rides, but not after that. This is because machines don't do stress-relief of the wheel. On a mountain bike of medium quality, I would expect spoke re-truing to be needed at most once per year. As far I know, tension of the spokes is the only thing, that is responsible to keep the ...


1

You should wash and inspect the rim for cracks. I had a rear wheel that would not stay true, the problem was small cracks around the nipple holes in the rim. The nipples were slowly cracking through over a period of weeks. only a few were doing this so the tension was held by neighboring spokes. thus the only symptom was going out of true. pluck the spokes ...


10

A well built wheel should go years without needed truing. If you are truing the wheel every 2 months something is wrong with the build. There's no way to know via the internet, but my guess is that it's one of two things. The rim is bent slightly and requires significantly uneven tension in the spokes to get the rim true. There isn't enough tension in ...


0

To setup bicycle computer you need to find out circumstance of your wheel in mm. Most reliable way I know is the following. enter some approximate value and call it c0 (circumstance initial) drive some track of well known length, athletic course, rowing track, 100km ride, anything that has some length and you know long it is. let's call this value dA ...


3

A 70s Peugeot sold outside France probably used 27" wheels, not 700c wheels (though aside from the Velo Orange wheelset, you're probably going to have trouble finding 27" wheels and will have to try 700c wheels + a brake that fits it [an extra 4 mm adjustment is needed]). The bigger issue is finding a wheel set which has hub spacing that fits this frame - ...


1

When I raced back in the eighties /'nineties 21 and 22 mm tires were common, some folks (me) experimented with 18 mm tires. Since then they've figured out that wider tires are faster, but not that wide. In a flat smooth time trial they're commonly using 23 and 25 mm tires now. They wouldn't use a tire as wide as 38 mm in Paris Roubaix and parts of that ...


2

The general answer is "it depends". Certainly, weight reductions help increasing speed, but improving the rider's strength and good bike fitting will go much further for improving performance than tire faffery. (Obviously, for professional racers, this advice doesn't apply - cutting grams and everything is part of what they need to do to win). Wider tires ...



Top 50 recent answers are included