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2

Orbital is the brand name of the hub. 15mm and 20mm are different axle diameters, get the one that matches your fork. Edit: Most dirt jumping, DH and freeride forks use 20mm, 15mm is a newer standard used mostly for cross country.


4

What's the advantages of bigger wheel? I feel that it's more forgiving on rough road, giving that the tyre width and pressure are the same. The main advantage is, as you suspect, that a larger wheel does not drop as far into potholes, and generally suffers less from rough roads. That's purely geometry, as seen in this comparison of an ordinary wheel and ...


3

The short answer is no. As Daniel says in comments, 650c has a 571mm bead seat diameter (which is basically the rim diameter). Modern 26" wheels are 559mm BSD, so it's a chance you could find a suitable wheel in that size and replace your rear brake cailper with long reach ones. That would, however, cost £50 on top of the new wheel and leave you with a bike ...


0

Great ideas above re calculating actual circumference via wheel travel (toothpaste!)...I just used a marker placed based on valve stem, rolled out one revolution (valve stem returns to 6 o'clock) and got 2209mm (it is a new single speed 650B/27.5" MTB). Unfortunately my CPU did not afford a manual entry so I used this table: ...


2

Your first question is, relatively, easy to answer. Larger wheels have an easier time negotiating obstacles – roughness on the road and timbers and crevasses on the trail. The larger the wheel, the more it can span holes and the easier time it has climbing over stuff. The downside of large wheels is more rotating mass out at the rim. Your second question is ...


4

Have you recently replaced a tire or tube? If so, then the tire may not be properly seated. Remove the wheel, hold it in your lap lying flat, and rotate the wheel around looking at the edge of the rim and tire. You are looking for a "low spot" where the tire appears to "disappear" down into the wheel. It will be slight, but it doesn't take much. My old road ...


1

Yes. Here's a tire size to rim width chart from Schwalbe.


6

The things that will make a wheel more durable in this kind of service are: Bigger tires – the bigger the tire the more space you have to cushion an impact, bigger tires also mean that the load is more distributed. Since the bigger tire gives you more support you can also run a somewhat lower pressure which means that there is more flex in the tire before ...


1

According the Sheldon need 25mm for a 2.1" A downhill wheel tends to be strong (and heavier)


0

One upgrade you could make without attempting to cold set the frame to far would be to use a kit like fyxation sells which works on a 120mm (track spaced) frame and works with bar end shifters. It's a much smaller width, so it would possibly work better than cold setting to 130. I bet you could mount the bar end shifter on some Gevenalle levers if you ...


0

What do you mean by resetting the pistons? Pushing them all the way back in so that they're flush with the callipers? It can be done simply by bending the rotor a little and using it to press the callipers back in. It's such a little movement that you won't deform the rotor doing so. Parktools (and I suspect others) make a specific tool. I have also used a ...


4

Cold setting a 114mm to 130mm is significant. Usually the rule of thumb for cold setting is you can go up one step, such as from a 126mm to 130mm or 120mm to 126mm. A three speed freewheel bicycle is extremely rare and I'd personally leave it alone, it's just too valuable to risk destroying the frame.


1

Nashbar's specs for the rim list the inner width as 16mm. http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_566766_-1___ (click the "Specs" link) This is a fairly standard width for road wheels, so you should be able to safely run any common road tire size (21mm-35mm give or take a few mm).


2

I believe it is not worth trying it. You risk contaminating, scratching, or bending your rotors, as well as scratching or cracking a brake pad. Consider also whether there are bigger problems with your bike setup if it's too much hassle to remove your rear wheel to change your brake pads — how often does that happen: every 2–3 thousand kilometres? Is there ...


2

It should be easy to replace your wheel. The wheel is a 26" (this is a standard mountain bike size wheel), and you will also need to match it to the right cassette. from looking at your bike, its likely a 7 or 8 speed cassette. Your local bike shop should be able to tell what size cassette you need based on your rear deraileur, which wasn't stolen. With ...


2

The real difference to look for is the axle width and connection method. A "standard" road bike has a 130mm/10mm rear axle and 100mm/9mm front axle that both use a standard quick release. If a set of wheels matches those dimensions and has disk brake compatible hubs, then any difference between road/cyclocross disk will only be in the various details of ...


0

Unless you've recently replaced the rear cassette and chain you'll probably need to replace the chain if you buy a new cassette as they 'wear in' together. You might get away with it but you'll soon know if there is a slipping or crunching noise when you put the pressure down when pulling away or climbing. If you need a new chain you might also need new ...


0

Road wheels will be more likely to be more aero with aero bladed spokes, and possibly 4 less of them. Deeper section rims are more common on road wheels than cx wheels too out on the start lines.


0

The pressure you can put in a tyre depends on the tyre and the rim. The tyre bead (the band that stops it popping off the rim) varies from tyre to tyre, and some will not withstand as much pressure as others. An expensive tyre with a kevlar bead should be fine up to 120psi. The volume of the tyre is a factor too, but even a quality large volume MTB tyre ...


4

Ok there are a number of questions in there. 1) 29" vs 26": that's not a question of which would hold your weight better or worse. 29" rolls a bit better, especially over rough ground, so if that's important to you, then go for 29". A bike with a very small frame for a short person, will work better with smaller wheels - i.e. 26" - but at 5'7" I reckon ...


0

Spokes breaking at the hub can be an indication that when the wheel was built the builder did not stress relieve the wheel. See Sheldon Brown's article on stress relieving.


0

The number of cogs per cassette will depend on hub compatibility. If you have 8 cogs (8 speed) you also have to make sure what ratio you want, the smallest being 11 up to 32 (largest cog closest to the wheel spoke) there's many ratios you can choose from depending on ride style. If you go anywhere larger than 28, you may need a midsize derailleur ... all ...


1

And these days 27 inch wheels are so old that the problem they have is overtightened spokes. People that do not know how to build wheels properly simply tighten them to pull a wow out of them. This works it's way around the wheel and they keep tightening them until they are at the very limit of their tensile strength. The way to tell is that when spokes are ...


2

It is. The rim joints are never perfect after pinning or welding. Rims that are intended for rim brakes are machined afterwards to have a smooth surface. This rim has instead been painted. The crack comes from the pinned joint. The spokes are pulling the rim together with enough force to keep it from breaking apart. This being said, rims intended for rim ...


3

Take a look at the specs for the rim (or tell us what kind of rim you've got). There are two ways to join a rim. One is to weld the joint, the other is to use a sleeve inside of the rim extrusion that aligns the ends. If your rim is welded, then I would be inclined to agree with Carel. But it if is sleeved then it seems likely that what you're seeing is a ...


-1

I'd say no! There is a visible fissure. The joint was not perfectly welded and opened. I'd take that one back to the shop and have a serious discussion. Of course it could have cracked when you rode over an obstacle and if you hit it right at the weld.


1

The biggest cause of broken spokes, that I know of, is inadequate tension. When the spokes are tight enough they flex a little bit with every turn of the wheel as the spokes at the bottom of the wheel unload slightly and then tighten again as they move around to the top. Over time this bending back and forth weakens the spokes – usually at the bend where ...


2

Cyclocoss will tend to be wider to accommodate the wider tires used in cyclocross. And tend to be sturdier. Are you buying the wheels for a road or cyclocross?


4

It seems like it could be: Loose Hub Loose Headset Untrue Wheel Tire messed up one way or another From your description, it's hard to believe that the source is in the rear half of the bike (I'm assuming it also happens when you're not pedaling, correct me if I'm wrong). It seems to be a fairly minor problem (for now at least), that could be very hard ...


2

I have two theories that might explain the wobble you're experiencing. Perhaps both have their part in it. Self stabilizing of the front-wheel (resonance) Usually bikes are built in a way that stabilizes the front-wheel. The term for it is trail (called "Nachlauf" in the image). It's the horizontal distance between the steering axis and the wheel's axis. ...


2

Generally speaking, the deeper the rim the more noise the wheel makes. A pronounced whooshing noise isn't unusual among deep dish wheels and disc wheels (as in the solid wheels, not the brakes) are even noisier. I had Cinelli and Hed discs when I raced and used to love the sound of them (the ride, not so much!) I would personally be very nervous of the no ...


0

It is a M8 1.0 nut. I found out the hard way because all the hardware store has was a M8 1.25, so I bought it and the threads were way too coarse



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