Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Had the same issues. Couldn't mount a tire, got blisters trying. Was ready to send them back & eat the return shipping & restock fee. Found a Video on you tube on how to mount the A23. Changed rim tape from velox to a synthetic type. Followed the advice. Tires just slid right on with no effort after changing tape. Under 3 minutes. Tires were ...


3

When pavement is wet (or icy, or loose, etc) it has a lower coefficient of friction. Which means that less force is necessary to break from static state (tire gripping the pavement) to a sliding state (tire locked up and sliding). Braking forces rely on static friction, or the grip the tire has on the pavement. It may seem contrary, but while you are ...


1

You could get locking skewers (e.g. pitlock) or skewers which have hex bolts (e.g. this) [obviously, having a hex key or a 15 mm wrench isn't really secure, but pitlock is more secure], if you want it for the security. But all you need to do is run down to your bike shop with your wheel+skewer and get them to match it to an appropriate solid axle in most ...


1

Air pressre in your tyres is very significant in terms of performance; in case of slick tyres it's even more important than width. However it's impossible to arbitrally put any value of tyre pressure as perfect for a given bike. The tyre pressure adjustments can depend on: wheel size - smaller wheels need higher pressure because the overall volume of tyres ...


0

MTB Tire Pressure (PSI) Made Easy Individual preferences, terrain, and tire type play a role in finding the ideal pressure, but here's a simple formula to get you started: Step One If tires are tubeless: Your body weight (lbs) ÷ 7 = x If tires have tubes: Your body weight (lbs) ÷ 6 = x Step Two Front-tire pressure = x - 1 Rear-tire pressure = x + 2


5

The optimum pressure for any kind of bike is going to depend on a lot more factors than just the type of bike. You have to look at many other things such as rider weight, terrain, and tire size. It also depends on how you qualify something as optimum. Higher pressures might be optimum in some situations, but may not be very comfortable to the rider, making ...


0

Of course it's related: more pressure -> less contact with surface which gives less friction. But for the the exact pressure I think you should refer to the tire. Usually it's written on the tire.


0

A functional truing stand is a lot cheaper than a tension meter. But you don't need either to build a wheel. A bicycle makes a reasonably good truing stand all by itself. You can use zip ties to get good markers for getting the wheel properly centered and round. The problem with using the bike as a truing stand are largely ergonomic. Building a wheel ...


2

In short no. I actually took a true wheel that I had built and carefully equalized all the spokes on each side with a spoke meter. This actually put the wheel slightly out of true. Rims, spoke nipple rim interactions, hubs, etc., are all imperfect. How you place the tension meter on the spoke will be imperfect. All of these little errors can add up to ...


10

A wheel could theoretically be trued by tension alone if you started with a perfectly manufactured rim, hub, spokes and nipples and you were building a perfectly symmetric wheel. The reality is that there are minute differences and that tolerances are not all that tight. Not to mention that ultimately the wheel has to go into a frame that also may not be ...


0

Big thing I would worry about is uneven spoke tension now. If some spokes are loose (and not treated with thread locker), the nipples on the loose spokes may loosen, and the tight spokes may be more susceptible to breakage (because the loose spokes hold less of the load). I would replace the rim ASAP if you don't want to have to start buying a lot of ...


0

On road: unpleasant wobble. Off road: no noticeable difference. I came to this conclusion after they fixed (install new asphalt) the street in front of my block. First time I rode on it, I discovered the front cones are pitted and the rear cones are overtightened. Other than that, I would expect to both the spokes and bearings be more severely loaded then ...


0

You could argue that some carbon fibre disk wheels meet that description... Compare this, the drive spool for a human powered helicopter with Kevlar "spokes":


2

Depends on how extreme the wobble is. It takes very little lack of trueness to cause rim brakes to drag, but in a pinch you can usually disconnect the cable or some such and still manage (assuming the brakes on the other wheel are OK). After that, the wobble of wheel is distracting and will make the bike unpleasant and tiring to ride at high speed. Also, ...


0

With a disc brake, it depends on your clearance. I buckled a front wheel once on a pump track that was so bad it couldn't spin because the worst section rubbed against the fork stanchions. On a rim brake, if the bend is any more than the gap on your brakes, it will also rub. So, depending on the clearance you have on your fork or frame, there may not be a ...


0

Wobble Wobble is just plain bothersome. I had one so bad I could not even ride no hands. It is not going to fix itself. The wobble creates forces that make the wobble bigger. Clearly wobble uses energy. I don't need to quantify it to know I don't want it.


0

Spinergy has something like that - though not with a single rope. http://www.spinergy.com/catalog/product_info.php?cPath=20&products_id=84 Actually it's not extra light.


3

A single cable as you suggest would mean bad things happening for a single failure. Although lightweight bikes will always push the spoke count as low as possible they can still handle a broken spoke without automatically crashing. You also don't have enough degrees of freedom to dish a rear wheel even if you assume the wheel is self truing. If instead you ...


6

Mavic has made some wheels like you describe, more or less. They're called "R-Sys" and they have aramid (Kevlar) spokes surrounded by carbon fiber sheaths. Here's an exploded view: For more details about that, see the page the image is from: http://www.pardo.net/bike/pic/fail-001/FAIL-105.html More seriously, yes, you could make wheels with "rope" ...


1

Depends on the trails and the type of riding and how big of tires you can put on the road bike. Based on frame and brakes you are probably limited to 28mm or 30mm. Still a lot better than 25mm. If you are dealing with sand and/or big sharp rocks then 30mm is not enough. As for mud just don't ride mud. Mud need excess clearance. So you might as ...


1

You might be better off with one of the new bikes coming out with "gravel" or "all-road" geometry and clearance for ~40c tires. They're intended for the type of riding you describe. Current examples include the Raleigh Tamland and Willard, Salsa Warbird, All-City Space Horse, and Kona Rove. These bikes tend to have lower bottom brackets and longer ...


2

Personally, if your road frame is an out-and-out road bike - I would say you will be faced with several issues. strength of your frame Not only will this stress your frame - it may also fatigue the frame. And may cause sudden and catastrophic failure. tyre clearance Most road frames will not take a tyre greater than 28mm. Some no more than 25mm. ...


0

26" wheels are stronger than 28" wheels but I think you can get 28" wheel suitable for your weight that will last. Whatever size you choose I would advise you to invest in your rear wheel instead of using stock wheel you get from the shop. Buy strong rim suitable for 36 spokes, find a reputable wheel builder in your area, and ask him to build a wheel with ...



Top 50 recent answers are included