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There is a tool call a disc brake tab facing tool. This tool is designed to correct the alignment of IS disc brake tabs with the dropouts of the frame, so that the rotor will be correctly aligned with the caliper. See instructions below from Park Tool Repair Help Blog: Disc Brake Mount Facing (IS type) with DT-1 This article will discuss the use the ...


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Rather than quoting figures for the right and left flange distances from the Locknut centerline distance, they quote a "flange to flange" distance, along with an offset, for some mysterious reason. This image: http://issuu.com/novatectaiwan/docs/novatec_hub_dimensions should help translate their "Flange to Flange" and offset figures to be right and left ...


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Also be sure not to confuse tubular with tubeless. Tubeless looks similar to a clincher (beads on each side, open on the bottom), but doesn't use an inner tube, while tubular is a single whole tube with tire and inner tube combined; these tubular need to be glued on the rim.


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It looks like they are tubeless compatible clincher rims.


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Personally I would not stretch it that far. Aside from spacing you should check if your frame has derailleur hanger, and cable stops. Lastly you would have to ensure proper chain line after the stretch, possibly requiring BB and/or crank set change.


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Unfortunately, it is less exact process than you hope for. Most important thing would be to locate reputable wheel builder who will build wheels for you. It can be an advantage if he is local to you. If there are some guys you know that went on the large tour of tenths of thousands of km, ask them who built their wheels. Wheel builder would spec the wheel ...


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Don't ride like a numpty -- jumping curbs at 18 stone is not a good idea, especially with a loaded bike. You need to ride more carefully. However, many non-racing bikes these days are rated for around 18-19 stone riders (but of course, heavier riders will be more likely to cause damage). As for what to look for, a good quality hub (e.g. Shimano Deore), 32 ...


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If you at the Sheldon Brown tire width chart, you can see that there's only 1 width listed where 23 and 32 are recommended. On that page, he says using too narrow a tire can result in pinch flats and rim damage. If you think about the extreme case, where the width of the rim is almost as wide as the tire flattened out, then you wouldn't have much cushion ...


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You have a brand new wheelset which is within 0.05mm of true yet has wide variation in spoke tension. Because the wheel is true it probably means that when the wheel was built attention was not paid to balancing the spoke tensions. That is a sign of low quality wheel building. Tension among all spokes should be +/- 5%. Or course on the rear wheel the DS ...


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The spoke most likely to "pop" would be one of the other two in the triplet as they have to take more of the strain (making up for the loose one). If your wheel is still true, just tighten the nipple of the loose spoke until it sounds the same as the others. Do it gradually while checking this is not affecting the wheel trueness.


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With the rims brakes your bicycle use I would say there is no way you can change the wheel to a smaller diameter. But that is not a problem. You say last time you rode a bike was more than 10 years ago, and it was a different type of bike. It makes sense that you find it hard on this new bike, because more than it being different, you haven't been doing it ...


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You probably have the right drop out width. Unless it has down tube shifters you have cable routing. The chain size must match (e.g. cassette number of gears) and chain ring width. Your existing chain rings are probably too wide. But I think you would be better off finding a newer used bike with the stuff you want. If you stay with the same number of gears ...


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Changing the wheels will not change how you sit on the bike or the "fit". This bike uses rim brakes and a smaller wheel will force you to modify them heavily if it all possible. You can't wing this one and doing it right is way more expensive than this or a proper fitting bike is worth. Hybrid bikes are made to be more for a upright seating position. ...


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I remember Robert Wright’s wheelbuilding guide thinking about a rope over your shoulder pulling a load is easier than facing the load and pulling with your hands. Ie: the hub flange becomes the shoulder and provides another contact point to better direct drive force to the wheel. Big Jim


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I give you the following, that you can read here: Talking to Jason Marsh the mechanic of Greg Minaar 2012 DH World Cup Champion about ENVE DH rims (which are carbon), he said that, ”Once you have built them, you don’t need to do anything, the spokes remain tight and they don’t need truing and we use a lot less through the year as they are ...


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A hub brake (any kind, coaster brake, drum brake, disk brake) exerts a torque at the hub which is transmitted to the rim through all the spokes, or if the hub barrel is flexible, mostly through all on the side with the brake: leading spokes loosening, trailing spokes tightening -- opposite the load from pedaling. Because this load is transmitted through many ...


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The wheel nuts on the ends of the axle may have been a bit loose allowing the axle to shift a bit in the frame. Try loosening both nuts with a spanner, centre the wheel carefully, then tighten the nuts again (need to be good and tight). Then re-check that the wheel is running correctly.


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Sorry to revive an old thread, but I have the same wheelset. At first, I was losing up to half the pressure withing 12 hours. I started with 1 ounce of sealant in each tire. After a week, I added another ounce, and the tires lost maybe the same amount over a 24 hour period. Not bad, that is the rate for my latex tubulars But lately, the front tire is now ...



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