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A 29er will definitely fit you. I know shorter people who ride 29ers. If the most intricate riding you'll be doing is single track, then I don't think you'll find a 29er to be "sluggish". As Chris said, dh/freeride bikes have smaller wheels, but that's really about your ability to muscle the bike around, and having the wheels be able to withstand more ...


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Here is my experience with 29'er - just one persons view point in an evangelical war.... I am around 5'9", moved from multiple 26" 's (soft and hard tails) to 29er (hard tail) and ride XC. Recently we got my wife a 650B Merida. The 650 is slightly lower price than the 29er - and my favourite 26er I was riding most is an old/classic from Mid 1990's weighing ...


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I would say it depends on your riding style and the geometry of the specific bike you are looking at. 29'r is definitely not to big for you (I am 5'10" and my 29'rs are just fine). However, there are reasons that a lot of all mountain, freeride and almost all downhill rigs are still 26". 29'rs are less suited for highly technical riding, but much better ...


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26 or 29 is the tire size. You need to buy a frame size that fits you. At 5'9" you are tall enough for 29er tire size but not an XL frame. You would be a medium in most frames. I have moved from 26 to 29 and 29 is a big step up. 29 tubeless is even better.


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you need to know the width of the front fork at the axle, to know what width your new hub needs to be. Then you need the diameter of the wheel (mostly stated on the tire, 26" or 28" usually) and if you need a wheel with a braking surface on the rim of the wheel (if you have v-brakes: yes). If you have a disc brake in the front, you need a compatible hub for ...


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its wheel building machines in action https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCu7WXwdDxbGO39vre3_xLTw


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The freewheel may not be completely bad, it's typical for older ones to get gummed up inside and the ratchet pawls inside to be stuck open. Sounds like what you've got. If you look at the link above to Sheldon Brown's site in Kennah's answer above, check the section on Lubricating Freewheels. It's pretty simple to do this, no special tools or disassembly ...


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Search for "schrader chuck" or "schrader head", and take your pick. If you want one locally. any auto parts store should have a couple to choose from. Alternatively, if you need a presta head, just switch the search terms. Silca makes a couple of popular ones.


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It's just a standard schrader head. Locking heads are only needed for hand- or foot-pumps as you can't secure the head on while pumping the pump manually. Any well-stocked automobile parts store will have a schrader head for an air-compressor that doesn't require a locking head. Schrader valves are the same valves used on your automobile tire. For ...


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Here are a couple of links you can check out and gauge for yourself if it's something you want to tackle. This is kinda towards the deep end of the pool. http://sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html ...


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The bike is made by Univega and probably has a freewheel. If the pedaling motion still works, I'd guess your freewheel is shot (the thing that the gears are on in the back). You have to remove it with a freewheel remover and put on a new one. This requires a freewheel remover tool and a large wrench or vise, so you might want to take it to a shop and let ...


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Put the quick release on your stronger arm side based on where you are stood/sat when you put it up/take it off. Then you are more likely to have an easy on/off. I change over my car tires due to more wear on one side than the other but I don't get this as much on the bike.


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Given the age of the wheel, you're going to continue to snap older spokes from time to time. Don't worry about the gauge of the replacement spoke. Assuming it's within the range of appropriate tension, as long as it pulls true there's not much to be concerned about. I have multiple wheels with some of the thinnest gauge spokes available (Sapim CX Rays) with ...


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1) Wheel building is non-trivial and takes practice but there are some good references (and J. Brandst, The Bicycle Wheel). I don't know if a dynamo hub will be harder than a normal hub, but the first order of business is finding a decent dynamo hub which takes a disc rotor. 2) On reusing nipples: Given how cheap nipples are, why would you bother? Though ...


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It depends on the fixie. A lot of them don't because brakes are not cool among the fixie riding population (since they primarily want deep V rims to look nice and resistance braking). As for not having machined rims, depending on what the rim is coated with it can be OK -- if its powdercoated/painted for example, it will be too slippery to brake, but ...


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Is this common? Assuming your brakes are rim brakes: no, it's not common. It's also something that's known to happen. But it's a pretty bonehead spec, IMO.


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BORA ULTRA 80 BULLET ULTRA 80MM BULLET 80MM This question in part relates to Campagnolo nomenclature that extends across the wheel range. Where a wheel is described as "Ultra" you will find a carbon hub body with alloy flanges bonded on, and an open bearing system. The bearing system may be ceramic-on-steel running in a grease bath (called USB) or may be ...


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The najor difference is that Bora wheels are full carbon while Bullet are both aluminium rims with carbon profile. Also Bora wheels are tubular and Bullet are clincher rims. Still Bora are considerably lighter. And they have carbon hub bodies. As for these 2 Bullet models, as you said Ultra are slightly lighter; not sure where the weight savings come from ...


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See at Sheldon's page about centering the brakes: meaning loosening the bolt that attaches the unit to the frame and rotating the calliper until both pads are at equal distance from the rim. Then re-tighten and check once more. You should also check if the wheel is correctly centered in the frame or fork. In case of doubt always refer to your LBS.



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