New answers tagged

0

I have a similar rack at home and I find that putting the back wheel in is better (even with derailleur gears the rear wheel is usually stronger), and makes the bike much easier to lock. IME the most likely time for your bike to get damaged is when someone else is inserting or removing a bike, when they bump your bike and it rolls slightly out of the rack ...


3

These stands don't hold the bike very well because if the friction grip fails, the bike can roll/move backwards and then fall over as the steering turns. So, consider backing your bike into one instead of going in frontwards. Downside as ChrisH says is that your lock needs to go from the rack all the way to the front wheel, or use two locks. Also check ...


3

If your bike is like those pictured then it's highly unlikely unless the wheel gets hit or leant on from the side. That in itself is not implausible in a crowded bike rack. Lightweight road bike wheels are another matter, they have much less lateral strength. Even they would need some sort of sideways force but much less. The big problem with these racks ...


1

Handling will also be affected by having a lower centre of gravity. In theory the original wheel size would optimise the bike design and performance, though, as illustrated by Hicks and Criggie considerations.


1

Brakes, tyre clearance, and lowered ground clearance are the three points. If you have rim brakes, give up now. They simply will be wrong, and buying super-long reach brakes will be expensive and won't work very well for leverage reasons. Disk brakes may work okay, provided the rotor lines up, and your fork spacing is acceptable. Tire/Tyre clearance ...


0

Yes. Your frame has to be designed for the size of wheel that you are using. If you want to switch to 26 inch wheels, you are going to need to get a new frame.


1

If you have disc brakes, all you need to do is find a new set of compatible disc wheels (i.e. the rotor will mount to the front hub, and the rear hub has the right rotor mount and freehub compatible with the number of speeds you want), and you can swap to a different wheel size. Obviously, your tires need to clear the frame still, and the bike will handle ...


3

If you have checked everything external as per Criggie's answer, then the problem could be wheel bearings. I had the same issue as you describe last year and it was resolved by replacing wheel bearings (fair enough after 8000km).


4

If it sounds like its rubbing, it probably is. The areas to check are the frame - at the chainstays the frame - at the seat stays mudguards or fenders if you have them rear rack stays rim brakes, both the pads and the brake arms. disk brakes could be a bent disk Do you get the same rub noise when spinning the wheel forwards vs backwards? When you spin ...


8

Simple idea - turn the wheel over in the truing stand. The low side of the rim should move to the other side. If the Right-hand side is still low after flipping, your gauge is out and needs calibrating.


1

With the lever open, unscrew the nut on the other side a few turns. Lefty loosey.


3

The spokes support the wheel under compressive load. The rim in itself is relatively weak in compression. Of course, losing a spoke means that the remaining spokes have to carry increased load and you risk breaking more spokes or buckling the rim beyond repair. (Note: minor buckles can be removed through "truing" the wheel, a process of adjusting spoke ...


0

If the wheel wobbles slightly, you don't need to replace the spokes just look for one or two that are loose, use a spoke key to tighten the spoke/spokes that are loose. You can spin the wheel holding a piece of chalk near the rim of the wheel and move the chalk in until it rubs on the rim, this will show you where the wheel is out of line it should only be ...


0

Non-specific answer - you want the widest tyres/tires that fit in your frame and don't cause rubbing on the brakes or frame. This information may be called "clearance" in the bike's specifications. As for tread, you want some blocks for grip, but a relatively smooth tread in the middle to make road riding more comfortable. Everything is a compromise - a ...


2

You need to replace the spokes. Just one is enough to put the wheel out of true. Once the spokes are replaced you use a spoke key (a special spanner) to tension the spoke nipples to drag the rim back into round. This is a fiddly job which takes time, but is not beyond a home workshop. Once the wheel's rim is running straight your other problems should ...


3

You should take it to your local bike shop and get the wheel dished and trued. It is probably a mix of both those issues. Depending on how bad it is you may need to replace the wheel entirely.


2

The two notches are to remove the bearing race and dismantle the freehub body often resulting in tiny bearings going everywhere and there a nightmare to re-assemble. If you want to remove the freehub body intact you need to use a 12mm Allan key from the opposite side of the hub.


0

I've used a short length cut from a steel pipe in the past. As long as the Inner Diameter is barely more than the OD of the axle it will center well enough. The pipe's wall needs to be thick enough to not crumple under pressure. The only trick is to make sure your cut is parallel to the end, and that it is nicely de-burred and any raw steel is painted ...


0

If its the free-hub body you could just try replacing that! It should separate from the wheel with a large allen key (10mm) once you remove the axle and bearings. (price approx €20). If there's extreme play in it you would most likely get the symptoms you describe.


2

I ran into this issue on my bike recently. It could be a bent axle, damage on the inside of the hub, or both. If the axle is true, you will need to replace the hub or a whole new wheel. Good news, a new MTB wheel is relatively cheap, on the order of about $50-60.


2

Generally, there are a few wheel sizes for adults on the market now: 700c: This is the standard adult road bike wheel size. For mountain bikes, this is often sold as 29" and is also the standard (where they're said to roll over bumps easier than a 26" but at the cost of manuverability and weight). The rim diameter is 622 milimeters. 650b: This is becoming ...


2

It's rare for a manufacturer to have different wheel sizes for the same model, but it does happen sometimes. Fortunately, it's easy to check the wheel size, it's always printed or embossed somewhere on the tires. Yours will probably say 700c or 622mm or 28 inch - these are all equivalent. One other thing you'll have to consider is the rear dropout spacing. ...


2

Wheel size will remain the same, which is 700c, The different sizes of frames will only effect the overall geometry. So yes, you'll be fine getting a replacement of the same stock size.



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