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As you ride, your wheel deforms slightly. This allows the spokes to vary in tension over the course of a revolution. If the nipple threads have play in them, then this cyclic weighting and unweighting allows the nipples to move. You may be suffering from low spoke tension over the whole wheel. Spokes twist when the nipple is tightened, which may result ...


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Answer Looks like a straight swap (but the proof is always in the doing.) Neither link say what size the wheels are, so assuming the most common 700c size for both and the wheels will fit under the brake bridge. Neither link says anything about spacing, but we can expect the front is 100mm over-locknut because that's standard, and the rear will also be ...


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I was going to boldly say "no-one has made a rear hub dynamo" but then I did a google search and I'm glad I didn't say that, because I would have been wrong. Shimano make the FH-C810 which despite the FH suggesting "front hub" is actually short for "freehub". In full it's the "Shimano Nexave Di2 FH-C810" (page via searching their site for the short code). ...


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To be honest, I'd not be too worried about the noise level on your hub. I'm an mtb rider and the trend is towards a noisier hub at the moment You often get more noise when the spring around the pawls is stronger and gives a faster return and confident engagement. I did at one point quieten mine down when servicing by adding a little more and heavier weight ...


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In my experience, the most silent combination has been Shimano freehub and cheap cassette with pinned together cogs. The one I have is XT, but road hubs below Dura-Ace have similar mechanism. A cassette with loose cogs can vibrate more freely and is louder. Other brands that I have been riding myself or have had the joy of listening on group rides include ...


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It depends on your cassette as well as your freehub body. If your hub uses a ratchet and pawl system, then, theoretically, the "quieter" freehub will be the one with less pawls - but there are many other factors that would make that not the case. Also, higher quality hubs are associated with more pawls and more noise (think Chris King buzz). But, this ...


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The hardest to fit tyres I've ever dealt with were continental comfort contact (and I run marathon plus which are reputed to be difficult). Like yours they needed serious overpressure to seat, even after wetting the rim. After several years fitted they're still going strong. I had to change a tube in one recently and it was much easier but still hard to ...


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Those strings are quite common with continental tires and seem to be a part of their manufacturing process. Every continental tire I have owned seem to have some of those threads, even ones that mounted relatively easily. I just cut them off and have never had an issue with them. Continental tires are also well known for their tight beads. The high-pressure ...


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I guess you have an aluminium/aluminum rim, which doesn't take kindly to rebending. Steel is generally okay to bend, but I have no experience with CF wheel rims. Tool for rim tweaks is Vice Grips - with layers of padding in the jaws. If you can find the ones with ~50mm wide clamping surface, that distributes the pressure better and reduces the localised "...


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I learned in physics class that solid wheels have a lower moment of inertia because the center of mass of the material is located closer to the hub (think of a skater holder her arms in and spinning). Technically, this should make the wheel easier to accelerate and lower the resistance of spinning the wheel. The do weigh more, so is this of any advantage ...



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