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17

I have not had much luck with any of the preset settings (on my cateye computers) always using custom. Here is how I recommend to measure the circumference: Inflate your tire to desired psi Put a mark of chalk on the garage floor and bike tire Sit on my bike and roll forward one revolution until the bike tire mark comes back to the floor Mark the end ...


11

No you will not be able to use your 700x23c tire on a 650c rim. The bead seat diameter of 700c rims is 622mm, this will also be the bead diameter of the your 700x23c tire. The bead seat diameter of a 650c rim is 571mm (see Velocity's Spec section). Your 700x23c tire will be 51mm too wide.


7

Calliper and disc positions are standard, as are hub widths and fork spacings for disk wheels. Minor adjustments of the calliper's position could be required. There are however several methods for locking the wheels in the fork that will require your attention: traditional quick release or different types of through axles!


6

You can run different wheels in the front and back (different brands are fine). Heck, some bicycles have different sizes in the front and back (and are sold that way; 96ers and 69ers are examples)! The only thing you need to make sure is that the wheel fits in the frame and the brakes work.


6

In his book 'The bicycle wheel' Jobst Brandt, says that double butted spokes will be more resistant to fatigue failure when built into a wheel. This is because spokes break because of the cyclic stress they suffer as the wheel rotates. As the spoke rotates thru the bottom of the wheel it experiences a reduction in tension. Butted spokes are more ...


5

Look on your tire for the proper size. Different tire sizes change the overall diameter of the wheel and amount of distance traveled per revolution of your wheel.


5

As an owner of both 650c and 700c-wheeled bikes will happily share my thoughts. First of all, 650c wheels are lighter and obviously smaller which makes the whole ride more dynamic which can improve your maneuverability. On the other hand, 650c wheels are prone to sliding on stones or corners so you must be more careful when riding. 650c wheels spin faster ...


5

First, note that if you're using indexed shifters that you need to match the number of cogs on the cassette to the shifters. Cheap wheels are normally not worth the money -- you'll have trouble keeping them true or from failing, especially in a difficult situation like mountain biking. On freewheels and cassette installation, I'd suggest reading this link ...


4

To me, gravel bikes seem mostly like cross bikes with a bit more money they can take from your wallet. 1) Road and mountain shifters and derailleurs don't play nice with each other at 11 speed, so this question is moot. If you want to check a particular crankset on the bike, look at the width and the type of BB setup. I don't see why you'd want to switch ...


4

I'm assuming that when you say the "wheel" has a size of 622x15c listed on it, you mean the rim and not the tire. As others have mentioned, the tire size is what you need. Almost any 700c tire will fit on your rim, assuming that your frame has the clearance to accommodate it. Once you've got your tire on there, check the size listed on it and match it up ...


4

If the bike is used mostly for training, you'll probably want to give high priority to reliability. In general, more spokes is better than fewer both because they're stronger and also because they're easier to true; 2-cross (or 3-cross) spoke patterns will be stronger than radial or "mixed" spoke patterns (for example, radial on one side and 1x on the ...


4

Threads are a locking mechanism. The issue is simply the threads are easily damaged and do not properly tighten. They can distort from over tightening, crack ect. To say anti seize does not lubricate is nonsense, that's exactly what it does. It allows the threads slip, tightening properly. The pops you hear removing the nipples are the threads gripping each ...


4

When I bought the carbon 50mm wheels, I put on the yellow velo plugs. I had more plugs than necessary and I made sure the plugs fit snugly into each hole. Some plugs didn't. But I had enough plugs to choose from. Its been over 2 years and I have not experienced any loss of plugs. During those 2 years I had numerous punctures, front and rear and a change ...


3

I just recieved veloplugs today for the wheels i am building and i must say that i like the design and the fit. I measured the holes inside the rim and they were exactly 8mm so i went with the same 8mm model plugs. If you dont know yours you will definetley have to remove your tire and tube and peel back the tape to get a good measurement. I weighed the tape ...


3

You left out reinforced plastic/rubber type strips. Kore Chastity Belt strips are my favorite and rated for 140psi. Very durable. FSA, Origin8, etc also make this type, available in many common sizes. Price ranges from $2.50 - $4 each. I do like cloth tape, but the adhesive can dry out (even before purchase). Velox is $5 a piece at my shop. Rubber rim ...


3

There are advantages to all of them, but tape has always been my preference. I've used velo plugs, but in my wheels the incidence of loss was too high. They lasted me less than a year, before I lost all the extras, and went back to tape. I don't use rubber rim strips because the rubber degrades, and they move around too easily. I prefer Schwalbe high ...


3

Lubricating the eyelet with oil, and the spoke threads with Spoke prep or linseed oil is recommended. Anti seize is not lubricant. It should not be used in this capacity.


3

To quote Sheldon Brown: Traditionally, most bicycles have had 36 spokes in each wheel. British bicycles, for years, used to use 40 spokes in the rear, and 32 in the front. This was a better system for the consumer, because the strength of the wheels was in better proportion to the stresses on them. It makes things easier for the manufacturers, ...


3

A 6 speed bike has 126 mm rear spacing while more modern wheels will need 130 mm rear spacing (which you can fix by cold setting the frame). If you're getting a new front wheel too, you will need to do this to the fork as well (likely). If you go 7 speed and up, you can get a cassette wheel, but if your Tempo has indexed shifting, you'll need to use friction ...


3

Campagnolo (not Mavic) make a Shimano-compatible cassette body for the Zonda. It's the same unit as they also use on the Fulcrum wheels and it will take a genuine Shimano cassette directly. Whilst the cassette body is advertised as 10/11s, it will work fine with 8s - the spline pattern on the inside of the cassette sprockets is the same. You will need to ...


3

I would look at wheelsets that are for your specific riding style. if you're looking to choose a full wheelset from a specific manufacturer (e.g. Mavic) that includes all of hub/rim/spokes and even tire, then go to their websites for more information. These are generally lighter than a normal wheel that you can build up yourself. If you want to build up one ...


3

According to BikePedia, these did not come stock on the Bianchi Eros in either 1996 or 1997. Since this bike came stock with Mirage level components, you're probably looking at a low - mid level quality OEM rim. Fir is/was a good brand, as is Ambrosio (which came stock on this bike). Finding a rim from Velocity or Alex Rims or Mavic just to name a few common ...


3

I have a Cateye Double Wireless, and I was surprised at how much the tire circumference in the instructions varied from what I was measuring and observing. I run 700x25C Gatorskins, and the Cateye instructions said to use a circumference of 2105mm, but I was measuring a circumference of 2155mm, when the tire was inflated on my wheel. That's more than a 2% ...


3

You don't mention what is mismatched about the wheel set, but if it fits the bike it is hard to imagine what kind of problems you might have. The worst that I can think of is at you'd alter the geometry a bit – for example if you have a 27" rear wheel and a 700c front you'd be making the frame angles (relative to the ground) a bit steeper. I've been riding ...


3

If you look at the ETRTO specification of a tire you are thinking of using, e.g. 47-406 (a 20 x 1.9" tire) the total diameter of the mounted tire will be pretty close to the rim diameter plus twice the tire width: 406+2*47 = 500mm ~ 19.7". (the designation 20" wheel here comes from the diameter of the common 50-406 tire). The width of the tire will vary ...


3

It's rare for a manufacturer to have different wheel sizes for the same model, but it does happen sometimes. Fortunately, it's easy to check the wheel size, it's always printed or embossed somewhere on the tires. Yours will probably say 700c or 622mm or 28 inch - these are all equivalent. One other thing you'll have to consider is the rear dropout spacing. ...


2

Any bike can go anywhere. I've taken a road bike down an off-road course, and an electric assist road bike up a steep gravel path (not fun) My weekend ride these days is a non-suspension steel mountain bike with knobbly tyres but a smooth strip on the face of the tread for road comfort. As long as the parts work together and fit your body and style of ...


2

Spokes on any wheels can break ... really comes down to how well they are built, the weight they have to carry, i.e., carrying more weight than they are designed for and the type of riding they are exposed to. The Shimano WH-R500 wheels are lower specification wheels and I suspect the Alex ALX-295 are much the same. That said I believe the Shimano wheels ...


2

Current rim depths tend to be between 20mm and 80mm. You can choose along this spectrum to trade weight for aero, but for general use 30mm or 40mm is probably reasonable. Hand-built wheels are an advantage if done well, because they are less likely to have broken spokes. There are plenty of custom wheel builders out there, plus some mass-market ...


2

According to Sheldon Brown, 406 will be 20 inch decimal size. You will need this size if your current tire says 20x1.75 or some other decimal number on it. 451 is a fractional size. If your current bike has 20x1-3/4 tires, or some other fractional measurement, then use this tire. As far as bicycle tires go, 1.75 DOES NOT EQUAL 1-3/4. You should really be ...



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