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26

The answer to this question is different if you are going on a long-distance tour rather than going-to-work-and-back. If on tour and facing the prospect of a struggle to do 30 miles when you really wanted to get 100 miles in (e.g. to get to next camp-site) it can be a better idea to not bother, sit out the wind and have a go later that day/evening or the ...


26

I deal with this at least once a week. Yesterday I was going 18km and hour with a heart rate of 175bpm (normally that's 35+). I get on the drops on my bar to reduce my wind profile. I try to stay on less busy streets (normally I'm out in the farm area) because the side gusts will cause swerving. Pay very close attention to what's behind you b/c of swerving. ...


20

The most important thing is to make sure your core temperature is high enough. As your body begins to chill, it pulls blood away from the extremities, to maintain its core temp. Often times cyclists will think "my core temperature feels fine, but my hands are cold" so they think they need warmer gloves, when in reality they need another ...


17

Some suggestions: Stay in lower gears and cycle at a higher cadence. Using lower gear will help you to maintain momentum when hit by gust full on, and to retain control when hit by crosswind gust. Keep a low profile Avoid baggy clothes Find a cycling partner and share slip streaming


12

TLDR; assuming my calculations below are correct, there's roughly a 10% increase in air resistance between hot, humid days, and warm, dry days. Add in a slight but imperceptible tailwind or headwind, and it's conceivable that you could experience a 4–5mph difference in cruising speed between two days. Air resistance is the primary force a cyclist must ...


12

If the effect of wind resistance was linear with respect to speed, then yes, the forces would balance out. That is to say: if pedaling into a 20 mph wind was only twice as hard as pedaling into a 10 mph wind, the forces would balance. But this is not the case, as @Daniel mentions. The effort to overcome the 20mph wind is more than twice that needed for the ...


9

Look for gloves made with a Windstopper material. I have some pretty thin gloves made with this and stay warmer then my thicker gloves because they stop the wind so well. You may want to look at lighter weight running gloves made with this as I find them a little more pliable. Most I have seen are not waterproof though.


8

Basically whatever works. If you're trying to conserve energy it's foolish to push yourself going downhill, since energy lost per mile to wind resistance increases with the square of speed -- just take advantage of the "free ride" on a reasonably steep hill. Going uphill depends a lot on your physical condition and how steep the hill. You first need to ...


8

They'll never provide as much insulation as ski gloves, on their own - they're not designed to. They're intended to block the wind (so minimising the convection heat loss due to high airflow) but still allow you to breathe (which implies you still get the heat loss due to evaporation). A wicking/insulating liner underneath will add some straight insulation ...


7

I do my best to tack. Kind of like a sail boat. For example If I'm riding in the city and the winds are from the south I'll ride a mile or so south and then head east for a block or so to catch a break, head south for a mile or so and then head west a bit to catch a break. It sure lengthens the ride but it can be good to get the short recovery periods. If ...


7

1. Arguably, just the time it takes you to get from point A to point B is a perfectly good measurement of improvement (same with average speed) As you say, wind influences this, as does countless other factors - traffic lights, weather (wind, wet roads, snow and ice, etc..) However, unless you are remarkably lucky or remarkably unlucky, these variables ...


6

You can get explicit cycling knee warmers - I have a pair of these which see a lot of use (and sometimes go under jeans, very comfortably, if I'm out of an evening too). They are great for the morning commutes where it is cold but likely to be warmer by the time of the return journey, but also for the longer rides where you start colder than you'll finish ...


6

As you have guessed, it is better to work harder on the uphill and rest on the downhill. And as others have mentioned, whatever works for you on the uphill in terms of balancing high cadence and mashing is best. However, there are a few guidelines that you can follow to approach each situation in the most efficient manner possible. Downhill: Since wind ...


6

Small changes in bike fit make dramatic differences in performance. Heat and humidity make a big difference.


5

Probably you are looking for bar mitts (pogies). HOWEVER -- until recently I wanted to buy them, 4 months ago I had a nasty accident in comfortable conditions, just pure bad luck, that's all. From that point on I said "no" to any device that attaches me to the bicycle -- the reason is, in case of accident it is a split of the second, when you can fall on ...


5

I'm a commuter who has to carry things like books, a notebook, food for the day, bike lock, etc. I should say that it makes a striking difference whether you carry stuff on your back or on a bike rack -- a heavy bike is not as bad as a heavy backpack, in other words. Another thing that I've noticed is that my performance decreases if I ride five days a week ...


5

In short no. You're actually better off measuring power, through a powertap, SRM or similar ergometer. This gives you a measure of your physical performance that is absolute. So your speed is a factor of your power output, chain efficiency, wind resistance, drag, tyre performance, road surface, atmospheric pressure, and gradient. It is almost impossible to ...


4

I commute (cycle) for 60 minutes each way. I wear summer (thin and fingerless) cycling gloves in temperatures down to about 40F (5C). At 50F (10C) I'm wearing a short-sleeved shirt, and short pants, as well. I'm totally relying on the extra heat I generate (from exercise) to stay warm. You must adjust your clothing to match, not only the outside ...


4

I use a combination of a single earbud (currently Sennheiser CX380s) with a head band (I've 3 Assos headbands in rotation: http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?PartnerID=79&ModelID=38937). The headband both stops the sweat rolling into the eyes but also routes the wind around the ear. (I do generally wear a lid, so the headband doesn't look ...


4

The only thing that will work for everyone in all situations is to wear a heart rate monitor and ride right at your aerobic threshold. Otherwise, it will be mostly personal preference, for loose meanings of "shortest amount of time possible".


4

On high humidity days, the air has less mass due to the more H2O, which is lighter than typical O2, CO2 and N2 weights. On high pressure days there is more mass for you to push aside. Air temperature also plays a part - hot air is less dense than cold air. Therefore a hot, low pressure, high humidity day requires less mass to be pushed aside. These make a ...


4

Some factors that affect day to day athletic performance are: the degree to which your muscles have recovered from previous strenuous work. It is impossible to push the pace everyday, and hit a consistent performance level. Day to day consistent performance is only possible (far) less than maximal effort. symptom-free infections. It's possible for your ...


4

As you might expect, the exact down slope you would need for a full answer will depend on how much drag you and your bicycle produce. If you are very aerodynamically efficient and there are few losses through the bearings and tires, the slope can be shallower. If you create a lot of drag either via aerodynamic inefficiency or mechanical and rolling ...


4

Ok, let's start with wind chill. The faster the wind, the more chill Wind Chill chart from the National Weather Service Read along the top for the temperature without wind, then down for wind chill at different speeds. So, for example, at 15 degrees Fahrenheit (-9°C) in a 15mph (6.7 m/s) wind, effective temperature is 0 degrees Fahrenheit (-18°C). ...


3

It seems as though you have a different tolerance for cold than the "average" rider. This can be caused by a lot of different things. For example, I frequently notice the difference between myself and others since most of the state is very warm (Phoenix, Tucson, etc, where 75f is coat weather), while I am acclimated in an area where 60f is a nice day. As ...


3

IF my hills are in the 4% or greater category, it is always going to take me longer to get up than to come back down. Example, a hill I ride frequently is about 4 - 5% and I ride it at about 7-8 mph and it takes me ~7 minutes to get up there. If I ride back down the same hill, I easily maintain 23-24 MPH and it takes me about 3-4 minutes to get down. If I ...


3

Perhaps a bit drastic, but I've found wind much less of a problem after moving to a recumbent (for obvious reasons).


3

One approach is to just accept that you won't be able to ride as fast as in still air and slow down a bit! Its certainly more enjoyable than battling hard against a head wind, especially if you aren't feeling so good and not in a hurry. This, as well as some other tips, are included in this article: ...


3

I use a pair of the basic Apple ear buds that came with my iPod Shuffle for riding. I've found that they put out "ok" quality sound (not as good as my Sennheisers), but the open-air design of them lets a lot of road noise through, as well. I can hear almost any car coming up behind me (including hybrids), and can hear about 90% of the bicycles coming up to ...


3

I guess you may be working on the assumption that you have a total amount of energy for your ride and you choose which parts of the ride to use it on, or when to use it most quickly. Perhaps you suspect that, due to the lower wind resistance, you're better off spending more energy going uphill at the cost of needing to relax on the downhill? Consider the ...



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