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39

In the winter you will have to contend with: Ice and snow on the road Wet Freezing bike parts Cold winds Overheating 1. Ice and snow on the road This past winter I used the Schwalbe "Marathon Winter" tires for a 3-mile commute along a rural highway and town streets in central Vermont. Our winters are quite a bit more severe than NYC, but if you have ice ...


21

Studded tires are a must on ice. They are expensive, but well worth it! A couple of points to consider that have not been mentioned: Footwear: Winter specific riding shoes or boots. For mountain biking and cross, I ride with Lake boots. On the road, I use an older pair of road shoes that have been stretched to accommodate thick wool socks and neoprene shoe ...


21

Here's my solution. Take off wheels, pedals, and handlebars, and place the bike under the bed. Ok, that may not be the right solution, but it might point you in the right direction. If you start taking parts off your bike, you can fit it in a pretty small place. You might even want to consider taking parts off and storing everything but the frame inside ...


18

-20C is -4F, cold enough to be uncomfortable for humans, but not particularly cold for mechanical equipment. You will notice that lubricants get stiffer, but generally they warm up rapidly when you ride and the stiffness will be gone in a minute or two. Hydraulic fluids, et al, should be good to -35C or below, though they will stiffen before that, ...


17

A scientific Journal, Chest Journal, published an article about the efficiency of heat exchange masks on asthmatic subjects during cold weather exercise. They found that the heat exchanger masks were at least as effective as pre-treatment with albuterol in preventing decline in lung function. I found several commercial heat exchange masks which could ...


16

I ride year round, and it can get very cold in January/February. Layers are your friend. here's my winter riding gear: annotated on Flickr The trick is the windproof shell. With that on, it's VERY easy to stay warm, even down to -30˚C or lower. And windproof layers on hands and feet. Wind is evil when it's cold. EVIL! One trick I use is to put a layer ...


16

I have a continuum of clothes that I add on as the weather gets colder. During the summer, I ride like you do with shorts and a t-shirt. As things cool of a little bit, down below 60F/15C, I'll put on a windbreaker over my t-shirt and some full-finger gloves on my hands. The next step for me is to add an Under Armour Cold Gear shirt (many companies make ...


15

I wear a Bern Brentwood with a winter liner in cold weather. It's a certified bike helmet, but designed more like a ski helmet. The winter liner does a great job of keeping my ears warm without wearing any other protection, but doesn't block traffic noise. It is vented, but not well enough that it makes my head cold. It also has a clip in the back for ski ...


15

Well, this probably sounds gross and I'm kind of reluctant to say it, but I'm able to blow the snot out of my nose without hitting myself or my bike. I try to only do it when there's no one around, but occasionally that isn't possible. Basically, I turn my head so my nostrils are towards the ground and exhale forcibly through my nose. I'm not sure it will ...


14

Wash it. Dry thoroughly. You can even wax it if you truly love your ride... Lube the chain Lubricate all pivot points (derailleurs, brake handles, etc) Loosen the tension on the cables and put a small amount of grease on the cable ends. If the hubs haven't been overhauled in a while you can do that. Remove the seatpost and if metal apply a light coat of ...


14

I am also wearing a waterproof jacket over it which isn't very breathable Well there's your problem. The most wickable, breathable material in the world isn't going to achieve those properties if you put a plastic bag over it. If you don't want to be caught out in the rain, keep the raincoat in a backpack/messengerbag/pannier/whatever until it's ...


13

As mentioned in this answer to another question, I commute all winter in central Vermont with a Giro 9 ski helmet and goggles. The winter weather here has lots of sleet and snow with temperatures mostly in the 5*F-20*F range with sub-zero temps at times. This Giro helmet [and apparently many recent ski helmets] conform to the ASTM 2040 safety standard. ...


12

While the obvious answer is that you really should have lights and a reflective jacket or vest, I'm assuming this is the real world and you have limited resources! Let's go by what conditions you ride in: If your route is mostly well-lit and being seen is more of a requitement, I'd concentrate on a decent cycling jacket or safety vest. I prefer ...


12

Here a few other considerations: Make sure bike is 100% dry Yes oil chain and all other gears, bearings etc... If bike is steel, oil or repaint any exposed metal If bike steel, add nice layer of car wax and buff If bike is carbon, polish with Lemon fresh wood furniture polish If saddle is leather polish'er up with some mink oil or other leather conditioner ...


11

Like the other answers, disc brakes are the only way to go if you plan on your brakes getting wet at all. After riding disc brakes for a while now, I will never go back, even in good conditions. I would also really recommend hydraulic disc brakes over mechanical ones, especially in poor conditions. With hydraulic brakes, you don't have to pull as hard to get ...


11

Hypothermia can sneak up on a person. Unless you're paying attention, you usually won't notice until you're extremely cold. Hypothermia can slow your reaction times and cause severe lapses in judgement, so be very careful out there! It's best to avoid it altogether, but if it happens, don't trust yourself to make good decisions. As far as what to wear: ...


11

Bike-specific full-finger gloves are generally going to give you more dexterity, allowing you finer control over shifters and brake levers. They'll also have padding in the places you need it when riding. However, very few of these gloves will be warm enough for winter riding. The best solution I've found is to ride with a few layers of gloves, using ...


11

I live in Yakutsk, Russia, where the temperature sometimes drops as low as -45 °C. I don't think anything can break if all your parts are in good condition. But I think you shouldn't let your bike stay out in the cold for too long. I suspect the oil in the suspension fork can freeze, temporarily changing it into a rigid fork. You will need ice tires if you ...


11

There's no great way. The main problem is that inhaled cold air causes an automatic reaction in the nasal passages to create more mucous. And to a degree simply having cold air blowing against the face around the sinuses creates the problem. Some people will experience this worse than others. You can try using some sort of scarf or maybe a surgical mask ...


10

Your area gets colder than mine. I ride through winter, but mostly deal with rain, puddles and cold. Basics: for wet conditions (puddles, rain), you need fenders (aka mudguards). The fuller the coverage the better, and mudflaps at the end are good. See this comment on the useful accessories community wiki for the specific model I happen to use. You'll ...


10

Most rides in the cold I start out freezing. Once my body has generated some heat I'm great. Typically my outer layer is wind blocking followed by a jersey. Depending on the temperature I'll have either a long sleeve polypro shirt or just my arm warmers under that. I have both leg warmers and fleece lined tights. I wear the tights if it's colder. If it's ...


10

Yes, get a jacket. Also, you can get reflective bands which you can put around your ankles - I think these show up really well to drivers. For road riding, it's all about being safe and that means you need to be seen by others. Top of the range expensive lights will help you see where you're going. They will help drivers see you too, but most drivers have ...


10

Frozen cables happen because you've got moisture in the cable and housings. This can happen fairly often if you bring your bike inside after they've been wet and then have it back out long enough for that moisture to freeze. Two things can help. First, make sure your housing covers as much of the cables as possible. Second, use a cable lubricant, which ...


10

Wrapping with plastic for a season will result in trapping moisture, instead of keeping it out. Moisture will penetrate unless you do something extreme like vacuum-sealing (which isn't practical in this case). You're better off making sure the bike is well-covered to keep off precipitation, but can also breathe to allow excess moisture to evaporate. ...


10

It depends on your anticipated conditions. If you're planning on off-roading in snow you need tires with fairly heavy lugs (though too heavy will just collect snow). For ice you definitely need metal-studded tires -- riding a bike on ice otherwise is like riding on grease. If you ride mostly on roads that are fairly heavily traveled by autos the best ...


10

From a theoretical point of view, there are some possible methods to take water out of a fabric object, such as a shoe: "Replacing" the water for another, faster drying liquid and letting it evaporate; Squeezing the water out directly by compression and twisting (not usually adviseable); "Force field" like gravity and centrifugation; Capilary action (which ...


10

Rain, hail, and snow don't hurt a chain. Salt makes it rust, and dirt wears it out. Salt: You won't get all the salt out without removing the chain from the bike. The chain is doomed. You can, however, easily delay this till spring with regular application of wet chain lube. A bit of rust won't hurt if you ride regularly. Dirt: Given that the chain only ...


10

The trick is to blow the water back up the tube and into the reservoir right after you take a drink. This will keep your tube and bite valve from freezing. This works well even at well below freezing temperatures when skiing.


9

Personally I would go with the finish line wet as opposed to the dry. Typically I use the dry if I want something that will keep my chain looking clean as well as lubricated. From personal experience I have found that I need to reapply the dry lube more often. I will use a wet lube, sparingly mind you, for the nastier conditions. Having wasted your ...


9

what are the drawbacks of using an exercise bike? Noise (you mentioned this) Many quickly get bored riding on an exercise bike Promotes bad cycling form Can be large, heavy, expensive My favorite alternative to riding in the snow in the winter is to ride on rollers. The rollers I have used have several advantages Not as boring Amazing for form ...



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