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5

I bike all winter long, down to -30°C, there are some definite tolls to your bike at colder temperatures. Unlike a vehicle that warms up after the engine has been running for a while, bikes stay cold when you ride them cold. There are two things I notice the most, air pressure is definitely one of them; cold air shrinks, and low tires drag, so if you're ...


3

Going fast on unlit roads you definitely want a decent light. Personally I find the combination of my 100 lumen dyno headlight plus another 100 lumens on the handlebars to be enough, but I ride relatively slowly and on a manoeuvrable bike. On a faster bike with handling and brakes designed for speed you want more. Perhaps not 2000 lumens - that's off road ...


2

I suspect you will find 800 lumen to be plenty, even for avoiding debris on unlit roads. For context, I commute in the dark (and often in the rain) along unlit back roads and along our regional trail system which is unlit double track gravel with forest coverage. I often need to avoid fallen branches, rabbits and the odd deer that pops out of the trees at ...


2

Tires that are 27 x anything all have a bead seat diameter of 630 mm, so they should fit on the rim as the tire diameter is the same. (Assuming of course your current tires (27 1 1/4) fit correctly). That leaves the following questions: Are your rim width wide enough for the wider tire? Does your frame have sufficient clearance If you have fenders, do ...


1

There are many things that make biking more difficult in the cold. By far the largest factor is air resistance. At normal temperatures, the air drag grows as the square of the speed, and becomes greater than the sum of all other losses at speeds over 12km/h. A 30C drop in temperature makes the air about 10% denser, and drag is proportional to air density. ...


1

If you haven't biked in a while, that may have contributed. However, an unwinterized bicycle can easily be useless at those temperatures. Your bike contains several compartments with grease. As it gets colder, the grease gets thicker and you are pedaling against it as well as whatever weight you are carrying. Your bottom bracket, wheel hubs and pedals ...


1

The short version: the bike was fine (maybe low on tire pressure) but you were not, provided you didn't have something like a brake dragging (which you would have noticed). I doubt a bike would have retained air in its tires for a few months, so you should have pumped them up [this may have added some rolling resistance, but it shouldn't have killed you on ...


1

MTBR.com does a big review of lights every year; here is the one for 2015. They have a ton of useful information.


1

Any shoes bought for winter (below freezing) cycling should be several sizes larger than a rider's normal shoe size. Stuffing more layers inside a shoe/boot that is a close fit actually makes keeping your feet warm harder since it will tend to restrict circulation. This is a very common mistake. I normally wear a size 44, but my winter sets of ...


1

it happened to me too. i bought a brand new bike from a local store, and the rear brakes had a leakage, so all the rotors where covered in mineral oil. it doesn't matter how much you clean your brake pads, it wont go very easily. i sank the pads in water and then boiled for a couple of minutes, i burnt the pads over the oven, and with alcohol. then i sanded ...



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