Hot answers tagged

13

Most road bikes are the equivalent of an open-top racing car. You just don't ride them in the rain. And if you do, you are expected to be hard core enough that a little rain isn't worth the aerodynamic drag that the fenders would cause. And there's also a reason that hardcore racers wear sunglasses during the day or transparent glasses in the evening -- they ...


12

I think there is a case to be made that you will be less visible in dark colours. Anecdotally whenever I look down the road at a group of cyclists, it's the ones in large blocks of bold colours (not necessarily fluorescent) whom I can spot first. Bright but mixed patterns of colour are also less visible from a distance. I'm not saying anyone should be ...


8

Very cold and very hot are generally not good. Zinn has written an excellent article on this topic, and notes that Michelin recommends storing in 5C to 35C temperatures. You should hang the tires, or keep them mounted and inflated. In general you want to avoid UV and ozone (so keep the tire away from a heater, if you put them inside), and store the tires ...


7

Anything colder than -55F (-48C) is difficult to mechanically maintain. Most lubrication products on the market for cold weather are rated to -60F (-51C). Which means that at -50F (-45C) they become almost unrideable and at -55F (-48C) pretty much unrideable. I am aware of products rated for colder than that, but they have issues that when stored at room ...


6

I'd look at which situations you are encountering tire slips in. If you are encountering tire slips in cornering, studs are probably the way to go (or much more conservative riding). If you are having trouble while you are braking, you may consider adjusting your technique to be much more rear brake heavy or rear brake alone. I find that no matter what I ...


6

Some road bikes have fender eyelets on the fork and near the rear dropouts (newer eyelets are a bit hidden to preserve the aesthetic on some models). You just buy the fenders and put them on. I'd say most non-race bikes will have them, and ones which are commonly used for commuting or touring will almost definitely have them. Then you buy a set of fenders, ...


6

You'll need gloves that allow you to still hold the bars and use the brakes and shifters. Standard mittens don't work well since you have to grab the brake with all your fingers. Durable waterproof ski gloves with five fingers are one of the best options, especially those which come with a hand warmer pocket for extra warmth capability. Some folks prefer ...


6

I'm assuming you have rim brakes, since you are asking about wear and aligning brakes. Winter riding will wear out everything faster. The rims are going to be wet and dirty for most of the time, and the same goes for transmission. It might be a good idea to use any old equipment you don't care about as winter parts. The exception is that better hubs have ...


6

One of the advantages of having winter wheels is that you can spec wider rims for the winter season. Fatter tires should be able to give you more traction in snow and mud. You can then switch to thinner rims and tires in the spring. Your winter wheelset could be on the cheapside since you're not particularly interested in superlight wheels. You can often ...


5

You will go further and faster on a road bike for the same effort. You go further and faster on a better (i.e. more expensive) bike. Training is not about going further and faster for the same effort, its about putting in more effort. So, will a road bike make a difference - only if you will put in more effort on the road bike than the MTB. If the idea of ...


5

It appears your rear derailleur pulley cage spring is not doing its job. In your picture, it should be pivoted back towards the right side of the picture, maintaining chain tension. You'll have to remove and clean out your pulley cage, clean up and lubricate the spring and reassemble it. If that doesn't solve your problem, you'll have to replace the ...


4

This article measures the sizes of studs between manufacturers. The upshot of the article is that if you have Nokian, Schwalbe, Continental, Innova studs, the dimensions are essentially the same and can be swapped around. In any case, I'd expect Nokian (Suomi) studs to be the easiest ones to find these days anyway... For reference, the essential from teh ...


4

Here are the things I believe you should be considering when making the decision. Fat bikes climb just fine. Yes, a road bike will climb a paved hill more efficiently than a mountain bike under the same conditions. But, a mountain bike will also climb a muddy single track that a road bike would simply fail to move at all on. Efficiency and utility are ...


4

If you are riding during the day time then black is fine. If you are riding during dawn/dusk a bright orange jacket makes you much more visible. If you are riding in the dark then you need lights and reflectives. Colour (black/white/orange) doesn't matter. In my opinion brightly coloured orange clothing does nothing to improve your visibility in daylight ...


4

You will get wet if you ride at speed on a wet road without fenders. I think you can find fenders to fit almost any road bike if you want them, but otherwise I can think a few things that mitigate the problem: Change clothes shortly after the end of the ride, and wash and dry yourself if facilities are available. Wear tight cycling clothes. You will still ...


4

Is it a bad idea to cycle in full black clothes because of visibility? Yes. Totally. Completely. As Darwin said, it's survival of the fittest. Or in this case survival of the cyclists who get seen. But you knew that already. This is about making a choice about safety, that is, staying alive. This is not about will I have to wash it? The statistics are ...


4

In all honesty, I think your best bet is Bar Mitts or something similar. They're neoprene covers that attach to your handlebars and cover your hands. They allow you to get away with wearing thinner gloves so you stay a little more dexterous. If you ride drop bars, you're kinda stuck riding on the hoods to stay protected. You can still move your hands to the ...


3

Short answer, yes black is not as visible during the day, night or dawn or dusk. Distracted drivers are way more likely to notice you if you stand out and most of the time Black does not stand out (neither do earth tones). Visibility colors like fluorescent orange, fluorescent yellow, and bright red are your best visibility colors. White is a not a bad color ...


3

Your bike would like the same conditions as you yourself would like - room temperature air and humidity. Also bikes dislike being left salted - if your location salts the roads then rinsing this off after your ride is an excellent idea to preserve If space is an issue, there are several solutions for small spaces. If you have space up high then there are ...


3

A rear wheel with an internal 3 speed hub (you can get more gears if you like) should solve the problem you are having. The gearing system is kept enclosed and away from salt and dirt. It's a little expensive as you basically have to buy a new rear wheel, or relace your old one, but this is the best way to fix it. That or go completely single speed.


3

How much snow are we talking about? I’ve commuted through the winter on a cyclocross and had very little problems. The roads here (Austria) are usually cleared quite well, so I’ve never had deep snow. For black ice I used studded tires (Nokian Hakka W106) which — due to their narrowness (35mm) — also work quite well on slush. I’ve had the most difficulties ...


3

For pure road-riding: Neoprene covers over normal road-shoes are the best as long as you don't have to put a foot down too often. The cleats are prone to clogging in snowy conditions. But then you wouldn't certainly get on a bike. On the other hand, ankle hugging covers keep the rain running down the legs into the shoe, which could happen with insulated ...


3

35c might be a bit too wide for your rims, maybe 32c would be a better choice. They may fit your wheels just fine, but they may or may not rub on the chain stays, seat stays or the brake caliper. 35c tires are not only wider, but also have a larger outside diameter than than their smaller counterparts. If you have enough clearance on your frame & ...


2

The real issue with ice is that it has a very low coefficient of friction, and weight distribution won't change that enough to make a difference. Tires with a soft compound and a lot of siping help somewhat, but the best solution is a tire with metal studs.


2

I have been riding a Gates CDC (not Centertrack) belt drive for almost a year now. I have ridden my bike in various weather conditions and temperatures ranging from over 90℉ to under 0℉. I have ridden through a variety of snowy conditions, including a foot-and-half of fresh snow on a few occasions, but more commonly mixed snow/ice/slush conditions. I have ...


2

I see two questions here... First, will you benefit from a road bike? If you will ride it more than you are riding the mountain bike, then yes. That will depend on where you live (are there good roads or paved trails for a road bike), who you ride with, etc. I do most of my riding on my road bike because I live near an excellent paved trail and there are ...


2

It's not the temperature changes that cause rust, but humidity, especially in combination with salt. Let the bike dry completely whenever possible. I store my steel bike indoors both at work and at home (in unheated but above zero garages), and try to avoid salted roads (which is not always possible). It easily survives the winter. It also depends on the ...


2

Most modern bicycle components will withstand an amazing amount of variation. I do, however, recommend that you allow time for the bike to dry in between taking it out and keep the bike as free as possible from salt and grime (which will accelerate wear of your components). As background, I have had several commuter bikes that regularly go between a 70F ...


2

For a complete knowledge base on fitting tires for different rim-sizes, see here: http://sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html and scroll down to 'Width Considerations'. 30 or 33mm tires will fit your rims but they'll probably need a lot of pressure which might just be counter-productive on snow. On the other hand you should consider another possible issue: 30 ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible