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18

A scientific Journal, Chest Journal, published an article about the efficiency of heat exchange masks on asthmatic subjects during cold weather exercise. They found that the heat exchanger masks were at least as effective as pre-treatment with albuterol in preventing decline in lung function. I found several commercial heat exchange masks which could ...


12

It depends a lot on you. I live in Illinois and I'll go out in a T-shirt and shorts in the 40's for bike rides. But if you want some additional warmth in the around 40F and 3 miles, I'd say maybe some thin gloves (I have a set of Underarmour coldgear running gloves which are useful for longer rides in the 30s) and a hoodie - you might be cold for the first ...


7

As one comment has indicated, you may need to evaluate if cold this extreme is even safe to ride in. If you determine that is is, there are several issues you'll need to address. There are a lot of questions here about winter cycling. I went through question with the winter tag. Here are some of the ones applicable to your situation: Breathing may be a ...


6

I find that at warmish cold temperatures like the 30s-40sF, the most important thing is to keep my hands and ears warm; the rest of my body takes care of itself after a few minutes of riding. (I am assuming your normal garb does not leave exposed skin other than hands and head/neck. If it does, well, fix that first.) Have a good pair of wind-stopping ...


6

Look for downhill MTB goggles. These will be made to fit with a standard bike helmet and will have sticky plastic on the straps so that they will stay in place on your helmet. I rode with a pair last winter and was very happy with them. Kept my eyes warm and didn't fog even under heavy riding. Many also come standard with clear lens so visibility won't ...


6

I bike all winter long, down to -30°C, there are some definite tolls to your bike at colder temperatures. Unlike a vehicle that warms up after the engine has been running for a while, bikes stay cold when you ride them cold. There are two things I notice the most, air pressure is definitely one of them; cold air shrinks, and low tires drag, so if you're ...


5

As a bicycle mechanic in the Netherlands, I always advice not to use a waterhose. Rain doesn't get into your bearings and chain, while water from a waterhose sometimes does get in nasty places. I sometimes see chains or even a bearing which is rusted because the oil/grease is 'hosed away'. You can safely use water out of a bucket, with a sponge. But do not ...


4

Ok, let's start with wind chill. The faster the wind, the more chill Wind Chill chart from the National Weather Service Read along the top for the temperature without wind, then down for wind chill at different speeds. So, for example, at 15 degrees Fahrenheit (-9°C) in a 15mph (6.7 m/s) wind, effective temperature is 0 degrees Fahrenheit (-18°C). ...


3

I've found that "soft shell" garments work really well in that temperature range as long as it's not raining. Soft shell fabrics are jack of all trades. They are much more breathable than your typical nylon shell, they are more windproof than a microfleece and with a good DWR they are reasonably good at repelling light rain and snow. My favorite fabric of ...


3

Going fast on unlit roads you definitely want a decent light. Personally I find the combination of my 100 lumen dyno headlight plus another 100 lumens on the handlebars to be enough, but I ride relatively slowly and on a manoeuvrable bike. On a faster bike with handling and brakes designed for speed you want more. Perhaps not 2000 lumens - that's off road ...


3

I think it will help the most to simply having a better understanding of wind chill. A wind chill of 1 is a wind chill of 1, regardless of the air temperature you start with ( Granted, to make matters more complex, there's not really a standard for calculating wind chill ). The wind chill you experience personally while on your bicycle depends entirely on ...


3

I rode a couple winters as a bike messenger in the northeastern US, and this is a classic messenger trick for the worst cold wet days. While your feet may still become somewhat wet, at least they will be warm and wet. I liked wearing a thin sock on the inside, the plastic bag, another pair of socks, then shoes. This is not really a dry-day technique. Then, ...


3

Ski goggles are a good option, but the main problem with ski goggles is that they block your peripheral vision, even if you have clear lenses. You should augment them with a helmet mounted mirror. These work well with balaclavas (which are nice in the winter, depending on where you live). Regular old clear safety glasses like you use in high school ...


3

After looking at the setups people were using for the arrowhead 135 race in canada that has start temps around -20f, it looked like everyone was using disc brakes. Folks were using hydraulic and cable actuated discs (Avid BB7 is wildly popular). One of the best things for disc brakes (and your shifters) is FULL HOUSING. This will help keep areas where ...


3

I suggest getting neoprene covers for shoes and/or neoprene socks, which keep your feet warm even if they get wet from melting snow/slush from the road. If you ride clipless, make sure to get some insulation between the bolts for the pads and your feet. My SPD shoes have a metal plate on the inside that gets quite cold while riding. I had Pearl Izumi ...


3

Ideal Gas equation: pV=nRT With +15oC and -20oC the pressure ratio between the two is: p1/p2 = (273+15)/(273-20). Or 13% higher pressure when put in the garage. However that is assuming you are pumping it to maximum pressure, that the tyre can no longer (or very slightly) expand, making V (volume) constant. That is the basics for your assumption. ...


2

After several winter races, I've got an opinion. Keeping the bladder close to your skin and running the hose under your shoulder help. Blowing back into the tube is also great. I am iffy on insulation, many of the most hard core winter racers I know prefer no insulation on their hose so that when it does freeze, they can see/find the ice to manually break ...


2

Here's a summary of some the options I've found: Manual: Blow back the water back in to your bladder to prevent freezing, this can cause your hydration reservoir to bulge though. I've also heard this can introduce bacteria to the bladder, making it get funky faster. This is less effective when you have a smaller amount of water in your bladder. Use a ...


2

I have used this technique in emergencies while hiking, but never thought of deliberately using it day-to-day. When the weather unexpectedly turns foul (and this is before I had the money to buy quality waterproof hiking shoes), my feet would soak. So I would takeout a thick plastic bag from the backpack. Put dry socks on. Put the plastic bag over them, ...


2

Biking-oriented gear is generally unsuitable for very cold temperatures— though things have gotten better in recent years, it seems lots of 'winter' biking gear is oriented towards 50F California winters. I'd look at ski gear and Army surplus extreme cold gear. Civia (of Minneapolis, Winnipeg's balmy southern neighbor) has an all-weather clothing guide, ...


2

I live in a very cold, very windy place, and I ride all year. In my experience, wind chill as provided by weather reports is not very useful when biking, because it assumes you're stationary (or walking). It's much more useful to know the temperature and the wind speed and direction, and have some experience to judge what that means to you. If the wind is ...


2

I suspect you will find 800 lumen to be plenty, even for avoiding debris on unlit roads. For context, I commute in the dark (and often in the rain) along unlit back roads and along our regional trail system which is unlit double track gravel with forest coverage. I often need to avoid fallen branches, rabbits and the odd deer that pops out of the trees at ...


2

Tires that are 27 x anything all have a bead seat diameter of 630 mm, so they should fit on the rim as the tire diameter is the same. (Assuming of course your current tires (27 1 1/4) fit correctly). That leaves the following questions: Are your rim width wide enough for the wider tire? Does your frame have sufficient clearance If you have fenders, do ...


2

Most likely not. Most frames with caliper brakes can at a maximum take a 28 or really narrow and slick 30 (assuming a modern short reach caliper). A nobby tire will almost certainly not fit regardless of size. if there's a lot of clearance currently ( > 1cm), I would take it to your lbs and check with them.


2

The right answer to this (as with all tire pressure questions) is try it out as the sidewall ratings (and anyone else who gives you an answer with a number in it) is likely giving you nonsense. In fact, you should not be near the max sidewall rating in winter (or in summer) in most cases and thus this is not something you should be worrying about if your ...


2

Hit the tires with a bush and some concentrated soap. In the dark shine a light on them and you would be surprised how much they shine even if they look dirty. Once you scuff em up bad then just time for new tires.


1

MTBR.com does a big review of lights every year; here is the one for 2015. They have a ton of useful information.


1

5 degrees celsiusis is chilly and the main enemy is wind. Those are the areas of the body, that generate a excessive heat: torso head thigh Those are the areas, mostly affected by wind: knees palms front part of the body: breasts, neck, face I would wear: no backpack knee pads, thin gloves wool shirt with long sleeves helmet In colder weather ...


1

My commute has always been about that distance, and when temperatures reach around freezing point, I simply wear a ski jacket which has ventilation shafts under the armpits. Opening these helps me a lot from sweating, and you can easily adjust them. Also thin (e.g. running) gloves can help: they break the cold wind, but allow you to transpire. And finally, ...


1

See for a definitive (imho conservative) answer the almighty Sheldon Brown(bottom of page). The rim width can vary a little between wheels. Having said that, I have been running 700-35c Cyclocross knobby tires on standard Shimano Ultegra road racing wheels for years without any issue. Another really good tire for commuting and light offroading (gravel) to ...



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