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17

A scientific Journal, Chest Journal, published an article about the efficiency of heat exchange masks on asthmatic subjects during cold weather exercise. They found that the heat exchanger masks were at least as effective as pre-treatment with albuterol in preventing decline in lung function. I found several commercial heat exchange masks which could ...


15

I am also wearing a waterproof jacket over it which isn't very breathable Well there's your problem. The most wickable, breathable material in the world isn't going to achieve those properties if you put a plastic bag over it. If you don't want to be caught out in the rain, keep the raincoat in a backpack/messengerbag/pannier/whatever until it's ...


7

As one comment has indicated, you may need to evaluate if cold this extreme is even safe to ride in. If you determine that is is, there are several issues you'll need to address. There are a lot of questions here about winter cycling. I went through question with the winter tag. Here are some of the ones applicable to your situation: Breathing may be a ...


7

I think you'll be fine. You might experience some slip, but not enough to cause you to come off the bike or get stuck, etc. Three reasons I'll think you'll be alright: Your tires are also made of rubber, not just metal studs and will deform while on/around the rail. This means that some portion of the rubber tire will be contacting the rail and providing ...


6

Look for downhill MTB goggles. These will be made to fit with a standard bike helmet and will have sticky plastic on the straps so that they will stay in place on your helmet. I rode with a pair last winter and was very happy with them. Kept my eyes warm and didn't fog even under heavy riding. Many also come standard with clear lens so visibility won't ...


5

Having lived in a few parts of the US, I've found what people call small to medium to be drastically different based on the region ("oh yeah, we just had a light snow last night", and i look outside to see 4+ inches versus "it snowed like crazy last night" and i look outside to see a half inch and the whole city has come to a grinding halt), so its a bit ...


5

As a bicycle mechanic in the Netherlands, I always advice not to use a waterhose. Rain doesn't get into your bearings and chain, while water from a waterhose sometimes does get in nasty places. I sometimes see chains or even a bearing which is rusted because the oil/grease is 'hosed away'. You can safely use water out of a bucket, with a sponge. But do not ...


4

It's different insofar as walking on ice is different from walking on concrete. Traction is reduced anywhere from somewhat to greatly. It takes a much smaller change in direction, much smaller amount of braking, and much shallower lean angle in a turn to cause you to break traction. In terms of the physics and techniques involved, they're the same, though ...


4

I've found the simplest way is to get it rinsed off outside if you can, buckets of warm/hot water work well, then bring it inside and wash in the tub. If you've got a garage or laundry room, this becomes even easier by basically sponge-bathing your bike with a rag. Another alternative, but sometimes less worth it, is to take the bike to a self-wash car wash ...


4

You say you've got a small apartment that can't accommodate two bikes, but how about two sets of wheels? The only thing that can deal with ice is studded tires, so for those 20% of the days that include ice, you need studded tires. Your Tricross should be able to accommodate such wheels, so it would simply be a matter of changing wheels rather than buying ...


4

Merino is not magic, if you get it soaked it's uncomfortable and in hot weather it's probably more insulation that you need. It's just better than most other alternatives when the weather gets bad, ( cotton for instance, which can be deadly when soaked in hypothermic conditions. Merino also doesn't get as clammy as some synthetics ). Waterproof and ...


4

Ok, let's start with wind chill. The faster the wind, the more chill Wind Chill chart from the National Weather Service Read along the top for the temperature without wind, then down for wind chill at different speeds. So, for example, at 15 degrees Fahrenheit (-9°C) in a 15mph (6.7 m/s) wind, effective temperature is 0 degrees Fahrenheit (-18°C). ...


3

Ski goggles are a good option, but the main problem with ski goggles is that they block your peripheral vision, even if you have clear lenses. You should augment them with a helmet mounted mirror. These work well with balaclavas (which are nice in the winter, depending on where you live). Regular old clear safety glasses like you use in high school ...


3

In my experience of riding on snow both with a fully loaded touring bike and with a mountain bike. With the touring bike do your best to keep the bike upright and turn in short stages. As previously mentioned brake early and turn gently. However, if you are cornering at speed the best idea would be to stick a dabbing leg out if you feel the tyres are ...


3

I suggest getting neoprene covers for shoes and/or neoprene socks, which keep your feet warm even if they get wet from melting snow/slush from the road. If you ride clipless, make sure to get some insulation between the bolts for the pads and your feet. My SPD shoes have a metal plate on the inside that gets quite cold while riding. I had Pearl Izumi ...


3

Having ridden in snow many times before I'd recommend the knobby tires with some air let out of it so you can have more surface on the snow/ground. Just a bit. Not a lot. Also, use the mud guards as well as you'll never know when/if the snow will melt.


3

I personally find that skinny (e.g., 700x23) tires cut through light snow really well, and actually have better traction than thicker tires that can sit on top of the snow. You do have to be careful on turns, but it's just like driving in the snow: you go a bit slower. Bigger tires with knobbies on them work better with thicker snow. Basically, the thicker ...


3

I rode a couple winters as a bike messenger in the northeastern US, and this is a classic messenger trick for the worst cold wet days. While your feet may still become somewhat wet, at least they will be warm and wet. I liked wearing a thin sock on the inside, the plastic bag, another pair of socks, then shoes. This is not really a dry-day technique. Then, ...


3

I think it will help the most to simply having a better understanding of wind chill. A wind chill of 1 is a wind chill of 1, regardless of the air temperature you start with ( Granted, to make matters more complex, there's not really a standard for calculating wind chill ). The wind chill you experience personally while on your bicycle depends entirely on ...


2

I would get a spare front wheel and a studded Schwalbe winter tyre, pref 30-622 since it the smallest I know of and it got a quite low rolling resistance. Just leave it on for the winter period or swap it out for the icy days. I've been commuting daily year round in northern Sweden for the past 5 years and 3-4 years more prior to that. Up here we have ...


2

Merino definitely won't work as well to wick away sweat if it's not touching much of your skin, but the rain jacket trapping all of that moisture in also doesn't help. It's hard to say which is the biggest contributing factor. Perhaps try the merino on without the rain jacket once in fair weather, and see if it performs better than just a cotton shirt.


2

Since this was mentioned in a comment, freewheels are not the same as freehubs+cassettes (see http://sheldonbrown.com/free-k7.html) for details. The rest of the discussion should hold if freewheel is replaced with cassette+freehub though with minor modifications - I don't know if this bike has a freewheel or a cassette+freehub since I can't load the product ...


2

Biking-oriented gear is generally unsuitable for very cold temperatures— though things have gotten better in recent years, it seems lots of 'winter' biking gear is oriented towards 50F California winters. I'd look at ski gear and Army surplus extreme cold gear. Civia (of Minneapolis, Winnipeg's balmy southern neighbor) has an all-weather clothing guide, ...


2

I have used this technique in emergencies while hiking, but never thought of deliberately using it day-to-day. When the weather unexpectedly turns foul (and this is before I had the money to buy quality waterproof hiking shoes), my feet would soak. So I would takeout a thick plastic bag from the backpack. Put dry socks on. Put the plastic bag over them, ...


2

I live in a very cold, very windy place, and I ride all year. In my experience, wind chill as provided by weather reports is not very useful when biking, because it assumes you're stationary (or walking). It's much more useful to know the temperature and the wind speed and direction, and have some experience to judge what that means to you. If the wind is ...


1

It's kind of goofy and requires a bit of time to do, but you can zip tie your wheels to make snow wheels. While they aren't reusable if you remove them, it's a fairly cheap method. Here's a brief overview/guide. And then I went and found these too. They are supposed to work with all brake systems. As far as the socks go, I couldn't find anything smaller ...


1

I use regular "safety" glasses for my clear riding pair (anytime it isn't sunny): They work really well since they cover a large area and keep the wind out of my eyes. Great for myself with my contacts. The only downside I have with these are that they will fog up when I'm sitting still, but moving clears them off. If it is at a light, not enough to be ...


1

Cornering is cornering. There really isn't any difference in the physics. What is different is the unpredictable friction of the surface you are cornering on. There are a few things you can do. Improve the predicability of the friction of your tires. Studded bike snow tires will help the most with this, but even switching to a tire with a more robust ...


1

Brake early and gently. lean softly.


1

If there was not too much mud that day, spraying the brakes and drivetrain with the water bottle, then, once indoors, re-greasing the chain, should be enough (otherwise it rusts). Now if things are more messy, a rag and the shower portable head, set to maximum pressure, should do it. I use cold water, to save electricity.



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