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12

It depends a lot on you. I live in Illinois and I'll go out in a T-shirt and shorts in the 40's for bike rides. But if you want some additional warmth in the around 40F and 3 miles, I'd say maybe some thin gloves (I have a set of Underarmour coldgear running gloves which are useful for longer rides in the 30s) and a hoodie - you might be cold for the first ...


7

I bike all winter long, down to -30°C, there are some definite tolls to your bike at colder temperatures. Unlike a vehicle that warms up after the engine has been running for a while, bikes stay cold when you ride them cold. There are two things I notice the most, air pressure is definitely one of them; cold air shrinks, and low tires drag, so if you're ...


7

You can avoid this problem altogether with studded tires The pattern is deep enough so that it grabs quite well on the snow, and the studs give you a very good grip on ice and hard snow. On uniformly flat ice, the grip is almost as good as asphalt. If the tires are good, you can wear them for all winter season, even if there is no ice. The studs are not ...


6

I find that at warmish cold temperatures like the 30s-40sF, the most important thing is to keep my hands and ears warm; the rest of my body takes care of itself after a few minutes of riding. (I am assuming your normal garb does not leave exposed skin other than hands and head/neck. If it does, well, fix that first.) Have a good pair of wind-stopping ...


5

All of my winter rides are tubeless now. I have successfully used tubeless setups with Stan's at -40F. Many other riders in my area have used them extensively and without issue at temperatures well below zero. Stan's happens to be the fluid used by my LBS, but I am sure there are others that work as well. The hard part is getting the initial seal to work ...


5

The vast majority of cycling shoes (road and mountain) are well ventilated and not suitable for cold weather riding. Lake makes an excellent winter boot (I have several pairs). 45NRTH makes the Wolvhammer, which I haven't tried, but have heard good things about. There isn't a market for cold weather "road" shoes since generally road bikes become ...


5

I'd look at which situations you are encountering tire slips in. If you are encountering tire slips in cornering, studs are probably the way to go (or much more conservative riding). If you are having trouble while you are braking, you may consider adjusting your technique to be much more rear brake heavy or rear brake alone. I find that no matter what I ...


5

It appears your rear derailleur pulley cage spring is not doing its job. In your picture, it should be pivoted back towards the right side of the picture, maintaining chain tension. You'll have to remove and clean out your pulley cage, clean up and lubricate the spring and reassemble it. If that doesn't solve your problem, you'll have to replace the ...


4

Back when I did winter riding in Minnesota (in temps down to 0F), I used neoprene booties over my regular cycling shoes. These kept the feet warm and also kept out moisture. At the time I was using regular "toe clip" pedals, so no shoe cleats, but reputedly one could use the things with cleats by cutting out the bottom around the cleat (though obviously ...


4

Peter White has an excellent page on Studded tires. To quote (answering questions 1,2) him: "Q: Why do Nokian tires have a tag stating that you should ride the tires on paved roads for 30 miles before using them on ice? A: It's because Nokian is very sloppy in how they install the studs, and doesn't take the time to ensure that every stud is fully seated ...


4

This article measures the sizes of studs between manufacturers. The upshot of the article is that if you have Nokian, Schwalbe, Continental, Innova studs, the dimensions are essentially the same and can be swapped around. In any case, I'd expect Nokian (Suomi) studs to be the easiest ones to find these days anyway... For reference, the essential from teh ...


3

Ideal Gas equation: pV=nRT With +15oC and -20oC the pressure ratio between the two is: p1/p2 = (273+15)/(273-20). Or 13% higher pressure when put in the garage. However that is assuming you are pumping it to maximum pressure, that the tyre can no longer (or very slightly) expand, making V (volume) constant. That is the basics for your assumption. ...


3

Going fast on unlit roads you definitely want a decent light. Personally I find the combination of my 100 lumen dyno headlight plus another 100 lumens on the handlebars to be enough, but I ride relatively slowly and on a manoeuvrable bike. On a faster bike with handling and brakes designed for speed you want more. Perhaps not 2000 lumens - that's off road ...


3

I've found that "soft shell" garments work really well in that temperature range as long as it's not raining. Soft shell fabrics are jack of all trades. They are much more breathable than your typical nylon shell, they are more windproof than a microfleece and with a good DWR they are reasonably good at repelling light rain and snow. My favorite fabric of ...


3

At the time the question was asked, there were no 16" studded bike tyres. Now, however, there are: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/pressereader/spikes-for-birdy-and-brompton.html But unfortunately there are two different 16" rim sizes, and the new Schwalbes are 349mm (as used by Brompton), and 16" Dahon is 305mm. It might be possible to fit a Brompton sized ...


3

After looking at the setups people were using for the arrowhead 135 race in canada that has start temps around -20f, it looked like everyone was using disc brakes. Folks were using hydraulic and cable actuated discs (Avid BB7 is wildly popular). One of the best things for disc brakes (and your shifters) is FULL HOUSING. This will help keep areas where ...


3

A rear wheel with an internal 3 speed hub (you can get more gears if you like) should solve the problem you are having. The gearing system is kept enclosed and away from salt and dirt. It's a little expensive as you basically have to buy a new rear wheel, or relace your old one, but this is the best way to fix it. That or go completely single speed.


2

After several winter races, I've got an opinion. Keeping the bladder close to your skin and running the hose under your shoulder help. Blowing back into the tube is also great. I am iffy on insulation, many of the most hard core winter racers I know prefer no insulation on their hose so that when it does freeze, they can see/find the ice to manually break ...


2

Here's a summary of some the options I've found: Manual: Blow back the water back in to your bladder to prevent freezing, this can cause your hydration reservoir to bulge though. I've also heard this can introduce bacteria to the bladder, making it get funky faster. This is less effective when you have a smaller amount of water in your bladder. Use a ...


2

I have been riding a Gates CDC (not Centertrack) belt drive for almost a year now. I have ridden my bike in various weather conditions and temperatures ranging from over 90℉ to under 0℉. I have ridden through a variety of snowy conditions, including a foot-and-half of fresh snow on a few occasions, but more commonly mixed snow/ice/slush conditions. I have ...


2

I suspect you will find 800 lumen to be plenty, even for avoiding debris on unlit roads. For context, I commute in the dark (and often in the rain) along unlit back roads and along our regional trail system which is unlit double track gravel with forest coverage. I often need to avoid fallen branches, rabbits and the odd deer that pops out of the trees at ...


2

Most likely not. Most frames with caliper brakes can at a maximum take a 28 or really narrow and slick 30 (assuming a modern short reach caliper). A nobby tire will almost certainly not fit regardless of size. if there's a lot of clearance currently ( > 1cm), I would take it to your lbs and check with them.


2

Tires that are 27 x anything all have a bead seat diameter of 630 mm, so they should fit on the rim as the tire diameter is the same. (Assuming of course your current tires (27 1 1/4) fit correctly). That leaves the following questions: Are your rim width wide enough for the wider tire? Does your frame have sufficient clearance If you have fenders, do ...


2

Hit the tires with a bush and some concentrated soap. In the dark shine a light on them and you would be surprised how much they shine even if they look dirty. Once you scuff em up bad then just time for new tires.


2

The right answer to this (as with all tire pressure questions) is try it out as the sidewall ratings (and anyone else who gives you an answer with a number in it) is likely giving you nonsense. In fact, you should not be near the max sidewall rating in winter (or in summer) in most cases and thus this is not something you should be worrying about if your ...


2

According to this link Stans is good up to -30 F Stans Sealant Special anti-freeze agents allow the sealant to be used in environments as cold as -30° F. A comment asked about -40 F. Would it seal a puncture? I don't know. I imagine you can go a bit past -30 F and sealing performance would degrade. At some point it would out right freeze and then ...


2

Clean and dry (hair-dryer) the derailleur. Relube. Check. If necessary take out the cables, chase the water from the housings by pressing thin oil with a syringe. Put the cables back in or replace with new ones. It's always a good idea to change the cables before winter if you've been riding through rain in the good season. And change them again at the ...


1

If you haven't biked in a while, that may have contributed. However, an unwinterized bicycle can easily be useless at those temperatures. Your bike contains several compartments with grease. As it gets colder, the grease gets thicker and you are pedaling against it as well as whatever weight you are carrying. Your bottom bracket, wheel hubs and pedals ...


1

The short version: the bike was fine (maybe low on tire pressure) but you were not, provided you didn't have something like a brake dragging (which you would have noticed). I doubt a bike would have retained air in its tires for a few months, so you should have pumped them up [this may have added some rolling resistance, but it shouldn't have killed you on ...


1

There are many things that make biking more difficult in the cold. By far the largest factor is air resistance. At normal temperatures, the air drag grows as the square of the speed, and becomes greater than the sum of all other losses at speeds over 12km/h. A 30C drop in temperature makes the air about 10% denser, and drag is proportional to air density. ...



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