Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If you have a regular drier, tie the laces into knots, and close the drier on them to suspend them inside the drier. Turn the drier on high. This came from this post: http://kc-bike.blogspot.com/2008/09/tricks-of-trade-drying-your-grimy-shoes.html?m=1


1

5 degrees celsiusis is chilly and the main enemy is wind. Those are the areas of the body, that generate a excessive heat: torso head thigh Those are the areas, mostly affected by wind: knees palms front part of the body: breasts, neck, face I would wear: no backpack knee pads, thin gloves wool shirt with long sleeves helmet In colder weather ...


3

I've found that "soft shell" garments work really well in that temperature range as long as it's not raining. Soft shell fabrics are jack of all trades. They are much more breathable than your typical nylon shell, they are more windproof than a microfleece and with a good DWR they are reasonably good at repelling light rain and snow. My favorite fabric of ...


5

I find that at warmish cold temperatures like the 30s-40sF, the most important thing is to keep my hands and ears warm; the rest of my body takes care of itself after a few minutes of riding. (I am assuming your normal garb does not leave exposed skin other than hands and head/neck. If it does, well, fix that first.) Have a good pair of wind-stopping ...


11

It depends a lot on you. I live in Illinois and I'll go out in a T-shirt and shorts in the 40's for bike rides. But if you want some additional warmth in the around 40F and 3 miles, I'd say maybe some thin gloves (I have a set of Underarmour coldgear running gloves which are useful for longer rides in the 30s) and a hoodie - you might be cold for the first ...


0

My commute has always been about that distance, and when temperatures reach around freezing point, I simply wear a ski jacket which has ventilation shafts under the armpits. Opening these helps me a lot from sweating, and you can easily adjust them. Also thin (e.g. running) gloves can help: they break the cold wind, but allow you to transpire. And finally, ...


0

I just recently bought a pair of battery powered gloves - quite expensive but I have a good feeling about them. The brand is Volt. They're recommended by both bicyclists and motorcyclists. My biggest problem is that my hands sweat profusely, complicating the issue hugely. This is going to sound weird, I know, but I've discovered that if I apply ...


0

I postulate that poagies are the answer for actual cold weather conditions (below freezing). I wear the same full finger gloves year round from 75F to -40F. I have two sets of poagies from Dogwood Designs, one of the lighter sets and a plus set that allow this. My personal experience is that the gloves required to keep hands warm at temperatures lower ...


2

After several winter races, I've got an opinion. Keeping the bladder close to your skin and running the hose under your shoulder help. Blowing back into the tube is also great. I am iffy on insulation, many of the most hard core winter racers I know prefer no insulation on their hose so that when it does freeze, they can see/find the ice to manually break ...


0

Having a quick release in the hose can help a lot. Generally, just the valve end freezes and the quick release allows you to get a drink. Click the system back together and stick the frozen end in your jacket. Generally it thaws in a few minutes. The insulated hoses don't do all that much. By far the best solution is the packs in which the hose is ...


0

Putting a little glycerol (aka "glycerin" or "glycerine") in the water will help. Glycerol is edible, sweet to the taste. It will do double duty by giving you a few extra calories, and lowering the freezing point of your solution because it acts as an antifreeze. Because it's also bacteriostatic, unlike sucrose/glucose, it also shouldn't encourage ...


3

After looking at the setups people were using for the arrowhead 135 race in canada that has start temps around -20f, it looked like everyone was using disc brakes. Folks were using hydraulic and cable actuated discs (Avid BB7 is wildly popular). One of the best things for disc brakes (and your shifters) is FULL HOUSING. This will help keep areas where ...



Top 50 recent answers are included