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Hit the tires with a bush and some concentrated soap. In the dark shine a light on them and you would be surprised how much they shine even if they look dirty. Once you scuff em up bad then just time for new tires.


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When it's really cold and especially blustery and blowing snow I throw on a pair of Spoggles. They come in clear and most tint and mirrored lenses. They are our company standard for safety glasses on site so I have a ready supply. Great for commuting as they have a vented foam inner ring for each eye socket. Bolle and Uvex also make their versions. Although ...


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It depends on how far below freezing you are riding. In close to freezing temperatures, where slush and muck are an issue, a wet lube offers better protection despite it's increased viscosity and resistance. At colder temperatures where slush is no longer an issue (15F/-10C) you should consider a dry lube. It will offer less resistance while riding and ...


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Winterize your freehub body. This kind of failure is common in colder temperatures and a hub acting like this should not be ridden. In addition to the safety issue, you can destroy your freehub with partial engagement. The freehub needs to be disassembled, the factory grease cleaned out of it and regreased with a winter weight grease.


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Many fatbike manufacturers are currently making full carbon frames intended to be raced and ridden at sub zero temperatures. These manufacturers were previously using titanium, but most folks ran all the same carbon parts that everyone else did on their regular mountain bikes. Short answer, yes. This has been done for a long time and the breakage rate ...


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Perhaps. There are two main areas of a bicycle prone to damage in truly cold temperatures. The first is your freehub. When the grease in a freehub gets thicker, it can prevent the hub from full engagement. At best this means when you pedal forward, nothing happens. At worst, you can get partial engagement and chip/destroy the teeth inside your freehub, ...


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The right answer to this (as with all tire pressure questions) is try it out as the sidewall ratings (and anyone else who gives you an answer with a number in it) is likely giving you nonsense. In fact, you should not be near the max sidewall rating in winter (or in summer) in most cases and thus this is not something you should be worrying about if your ...


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Ideal Gas equation: pV=nRT With +15oC and -20oC the pressure ratio between the two is: p1/p2 = (273+15)/(273-20). Or 13% higher pressure when put in the garage. However that is assuming you are pumping it to maximum pressure, that the tyre can no longer (or very slightly) expand, making V (volume) constant. That is the basics for your assumption. ...


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Most likely not. Most frames with caliper brakes can at a maximum take a 28 or really narrow and slick 30 (assuming a modern short reach caliper). A nobby tire will almost certainly not fit regardless of size. if there's a lot of clearance currently ( > 1cm), I would take it to your lbs and check with them.



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