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I stopped trying to use glasses/goggles long ago and have gotten away with it because we rarely have wind here when it gets cold. However, I have started using a Cold Avenger when the temperature drops below 0F. I find that it saves my lungs on long rides. After looking at their advertising, it is supposed to keep goggles/glasses from fogging as well ...


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Any snorkeler will tell you... Saliva is a great anti-fog coating for the inside of your goggles.


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Any one who is serious about riding in the winter needs give some type of bar mits a close look. Nothing & I mean absolutely nothing comes close to working as well at keeping hands warm, dry while also giving the dexterity needed for shifting & braking. Most are a basic shell that attach to to the bars. They allow you to wear much thinner regular ...


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There's an outside chance it's frozen cables. Definitely not the likeliest problem, but if you run through everything else and it's still happening...


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it happened to me too. i bought a brand new bike from a local store, and the rear brakes had a leakage, so all the rotors where covered in mineral oil. it doesn't matter how much you clean your brake pads, it wont go very easily. i sank the pads in water and then boiled for a couple of minutes, i burnt the pads over the oven, and with alcohol. then i sanded ...


2

I suspect you will find 800 lumen to be plenty, even for avoiding debris on unlit roads. For context, I commute in the dark (and often in the rain) along unlit back roads and along our regional trail system which is unlit double track gravel with forest coverage. I often need to avoid fallen branches, rabbits and the odd deer that pops out of the trees at ...


0

I got a Niterider Lumina 700 for about $100 on Amazon. It's plenty bright for commuting (most of the time I don't even use the high setting) on unlit roads, it throws a pretty wide beam, and the light is very white. It's rechargeable through USB which is awesome, so I charge it up at work when I see the indication that it's getting low.


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I run a 200 lumen headlamp that claims 175 hours out of 4 AAs and cost roughly $100. In the wide mode (outside spread LEDs) it produces more than enough light to be seen with and I can see with it fairly well. When I need more light, I can cut over to the big beam and see as much as I need to. I bought it mainly for racing, but the battery life was so ...


0

Get thick Neoprene cycling shoe covers. I got these last winter after two years of cold feet (pun not intended) and they are wonderfull!


1

MTBR.com does a big review of lights every year; here is the one for 2015. They have a ton of useful information.


3

Going fast on unlit roads you definitely want a decent light. Personally I find the combination of my 100 lumen dyno headlight plus another 100 lumens on the handlebars to be enough, but I ride relatively slowly and on a manoeuvrable bike. On a faster bike with handling and brakes designed for speed you want more. Perhaps not 2000 lumens - that's off road ...


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I've been experimenting with the whole cold/sweat/wool/plastic bag dilemma and I think that I may have found another way to go about it. Yesterday, I put one of those toe warmers that you stick to the toe part of your insole. I put on a pair of medium weight wool socks. My feet sweat like crazy like always but they were pretty warm, even when I'd stop. I ...


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For maximum effectiveness, a vapor barrier should be worn as close to the skin as possible. A vapor barrier works to keep your warm two main ways. The first is that is stops your sweat from carrying heat away from your body (stops evaporative cooling). The second is that because your sweat doesn't move away from you, your insulation stays dry and is more ...


1

Any shoes bought for winter (below freezing) cycling should be several sizes larger than a rider's normal shoe size. Stuffing more layers inside a shoe/boot that is a close fit actually makes keeping your feet warm harder since it will tend to restrict circulation. This is a very common mistake. I normally wear a size 44, but my winter sets of ...


0

I bought a few wool blend base layer tops and bottoms and a pair of neoprene gloves, all from Costco, which keep me very comfortable down to 40 degrees. As the temperature dips lower, I am experimenting with adding layers. At 34 degrees, I wore two pairs of the base layer bottoms, one on top, plus a very thin windbreaker from REI, which worked very well. I ...


1

This sounds like a perfect job for a Fatbike! Those bikes were made for such conditions you describe. You have tires you can run with really low pressure (for more traction in the snow). You can have your mountainbike frame and disc brakes. In my opinion you even don't need a suspension with such a bike, the low pressure in your tires is really enough ...



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