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15

Way back when safety bike were becoming popular women wore skirts. Skirt lengths were to the ankle. The dropped top bar made getting on possible while maintaining resectability. Women were considered to fragile to risk hitting the top tube hence the slanted bar. The trend continued even long after women stopped riding in long skirts. Modern WSD (women ...


13

Saddles can be very specific to the individual...but some general advice: Try to find a local bike shop that will let you test ride different saddles. Five minutes on a trainer is not enough, a good bike shop will let you take a saddle on a real ride. Talk with others that have similar biking style. A great mountain bike saddle does not always make a great ...


10

If you and she are willing to throw down on a custom, I can personally recommend Violet Crown Cycles. Otherwise, consider the Rivendell Betty Foy/Ivan Gomez or building up a Soma Buena Vista... but she might actually do fine picking up a mass-market step-through that fits well (Electra, Jamis, and Trek have models worth looking at) and upgrading the ...


10

In this case, it stands for "Women Specific Design". With regard to bicycles, in some respects, especially the seat, clothing and shoes, women often have different needs than men. WSD bicycles or accessories address this problem.


7

As @popiset said, it stands for "Women's Specific Design" and is Trek's marketing term for a bicycle designed from the outset for a woman. See Trek's Women's Page for the specifics within that brand. Many of the big bicycle manufacturers have bicycles aimed specifically at women, sometimes there's an obvious scheme like Trek's where they tack on a "women's" ...


7

For MTB I have observed that many bikes marketed as woman specific are almost a scam, they are only the same frame with different colors and lower grade transmission parts (I remember one where the male model was 9 spd while the female was 8 spd, but the frame had pink patches... ) Before any feminist starts pointing out that I'm a male rider, let me state ...


5

There aren't many options out there for cranks shorter than 165mm. Your best bet is to buy a set of longer crankarms and get them shortened at a service like Bikesmith Design. Also, if you are legitimately having knee problems, I'd suggest that you find a professional fit service in your area and have a fitting done. The length of your cranks may not be the ...


5

Any standard non-racing bike can handle 250 pounds. If you can handle those maintenance items you're better than the average cyclist. There's no extra maintenance required for a steel vs aluminum frame -- it takes decades for rust to damage a steel frame even if left outside most of the time. An aluminum frame, being a softer metal, is somewhat more easily ...


5

First and foremost you just need to be comfortable. This means, among other things, avoiding clothes that chafe when doing the sort of riding you do. (Note that this means you may need different clothes for different types/durations of riding.) With your shoulder problem you probably need a more "relaxed" riding position -- this may mean (compared to ...


5

From what you have written, I could give these advice: Ladies use to bike a lot, since the dawn of the bike ages, and there seems not to be a significant difference on the bicycle itself. If a bike is properly fit to the rider, any style or level of activity may be performed for both women or men. Cycling is not the "worst" sport regarding breast ...


4

Take a look at the models by Electra with a 24" wheel, find a stockist and get your lady friend to try one. Not the lightest but well specified and easy on the novice due to their geometry. Really anything with the 24" wheel makes sense for the 5'4" rider. Going smaller wheeled with a 20" wheel Dahon folder makes sense too, however, 20" wheel is a bit ...


4

Shimano and other companies make women's specific shifter/brake levers that are designed for small hands. These tend to come on women's specific bikes, but any reasonable bike shop should be able to special order a pair. While moving the lever itself may help her reach the brake when she's in the drops, it's never going to reduce the distance from the ...


3

Except for differences in size (because women tend to be shorter than men), women's frames are no different than men's frames, really. Although "step-through" frames have typically been marketed as women's frames in the USA, they're ridden by both men and women elsewhere. This type of frame is very convenient for utility and commuter bikes in urban areas ...


3

Several options: Public bikes - has several frame styles with step through design Linus bikes - has several frame styles with step through design Soma Buena Vista - a nice mixte frame style, available as a frame or complete bike. May want to consider adding fenders with a skirt guard if she frequently rides with a longer skirt.


3

The first thing is style. There are the conventional step through/lady frames: and mixties which have the same sort of clearance as step through frames but are stronger. Then there are women specific geometry bikes. In general, both mixtes and step through bikes are inferior to the standard diamond frame due to reduced strength and stiffness, ...


3

If the problem is that the levers are too far out from the bars, that may be fixable. Some brake levers come with small rubber inserts that you can use to reduce the distance to the levers.


3

I'm answering the unasked question: "How do I find a hard-to-find bike?" Certainly this bike exists, but you may have to stick with your search for some time before finding it. (I sympathize with the situation. I take a 19" frame in mens, and most bikes are too large for me.) Mens' bikes often have a reach that's a bit too long, and handlebars that's a ...


3

Trek has a wide range of women's bikes that seem to fit what you're looking for. I think the one thing you are going to have trouble with is finding a bike that a woman can lift up and down the stairs. If you want to add rack and fenders, then most "racing" bikes that are really light will not accommodate racks. Also, racks and fenders add quite a bit of ...


3

Trek is a large reputable bicycle company. They make a lot of bikes. They're basically all good, if used for what they're made for. There may be a few models now and then that have problems, but that's true of all the bicycle companies. The Trek Atwood WSD appears to basically be a steel version of the Trek 7.1 FX Stagger with some details to make it look a ...


2

Look at the new Venture series from Scott. Designed as the ultimate touring hybrid, they are fast, agile, low maintenance, and strong. They are more aggressively positioned than your Electra, but not a forward as a hard tail mountain bike or a road bike would be. The link is to the new Venture 10, which is pictured below. The bike comes as pictured, with ...


2

I see a few options here: Get the lightest regular production commuter bike you can and keep the accessories light Get a lightweight sporty bike and add some of those commuter features Get a "ladies" specialty bike Get a custom bike built Anything you add to the bike will add weight. A few things to think of with accessories: Instead of a heavy chain, ...


2

Of course, a smaller bike, with 24" wheels, say, or even 26" would be proportionally lighter, and a little less awkward to handle on stairs. And there are other ways to make some headway in terms of weight and awkwardness on the stairs. Eg: full-sized fenders are more awkward than shorties, and front fenders tend to be especially awkward, so you may want ...


2

My wife is 5'2" also and found a decent road bike (aluminum frame, cheap carbon fork, cheater brakes, Shimano 105 group) online. The bike she bought is indeed 46cm with 650c wheels and fits her really well. It was about $500 new from one of those cheap places I'm embarrassed to mention where you have to tune it up and put the bars and brakes on yourself. ...


2

The first thing to do is find the local bike shops (preferably locally owned, not large multinational chains) and look around and ask around there. Try to check multiple shops, not just the first one you find, since they may specialize and you may find some easier to work with. Try chatting with the staff; if they don't carry what you're looking for they may ...


2

Women have different leg/arm/torso ratios, so if a frame truly has a women specific geometry, you're going to typically see a shorter effective toptube and longer seat tube & headtube. For really small women's frames (and men's for that matter), the geometry starts to get really wonky because the wheel size and BB height typically don't change. I won't ...


2

The distinction between women's specific and regular bikes isn't a hard rule, and you don't need a women's specific bike for a woman. Many women use standard bicycles without any problems, though just like men, they may need to tweak stem length, handlebar height, saddle width and height and position (usually, women's geometry bikes have a combination of ...


1

There aren't more than two things going on here really. One, women are generally shorter. Two, someone probably thought the quickest way to be able to differentiate the women's models was to slant the top bar a little, and it caught on. It's not by any means a standard, and most well built bicycles don't have much difference in shape between the women's and ...


1

Saddle comfort has many variables, addressing all of them can be scary or "drowning" for the new rider. One variable is obviously particular anatomy. As it is true that women differ from men, there can be huge differences among riders of the same gender. Also, even though there are women specific designs, a women's saddle is not radically different from a ...


1

I think a bike fit is in order at your LBS. You may need to adjust the saddle height, saddle of appropriate width, saddle angle, stem height, stem length, handlebar angle, figure out if the top tube length is appropriate, etc. Saddle discomfort is not isolated to just the saddle, but also geometry of riding. Most road bikes force you to sit on your "sit ...


1

I have never had a sore seat. I started riding 20 to 30 minutes every day, and worked up from there. I am much stronger now (after commuting 10000 km in a year) than I was. My power goes through my legs (I wear bike shoes), so only part of my body weight is on my seat (because some of my weight is instead pushing down on my leg[s]): I think that's what ...



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