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7

Snake bites (i.e pinch flats) depend on tyre strength, tube thickness (in case you use tubes), rider weight, riding style, terain and luck (or unluck). You really need to experiment with the pressures. For example test if 25/30 PSI (front/rear) feels good and see how long you can go with that without a pinch flat. If you get a pinch flat on the rear once a ...


5

You'll only benefit from better bibs, insofar as they fit as they should. Given that you seem content with your current set, start with the same size when making a new purchase. For the differences... Start by checking the stitching all the way around on the new ones that you're interested in and compare it to those that you already know. Quite a bit of ...


5

A lot depends on what you mean by "trail/downhill" and by "work". It wasn't that long ago that a full squish 100mm fork bike was a full on downhill machine. However, the big drawback to that bike as a descender is the relatively steep head angles. Putting a bigger fork will help with that, but it won't help with the issue of how robust the parts are ...


5

There are multiple ways to talk about wheel/tire sizing. "700c" is an old standard that's actually the exact same size as "622" or "29er". 622x14 is the ISO standard way to refer to the rim's bead seat diameter. 700x33 is "622x33" in ISO standard sizing. 622 means it will fit a 622 rim. 33 means that on some standard rim, the width of the inflated tire is ...


4

I run a single front with a "Single Ring Chain Guide" very similar to the pic on the left. There are also similar options for multiple rings like you see on the right. They keep the chain from slapping, but more importantly (for me anyway) they keep the chain on the rings. The more rings you have, the more options you can choose from, the longer the chain ...


4

I ride a hard tail over all sorts of terrain. Generally I ride on the middle chain ring in these situations. Its less to do with the mechanics, and more to do with whats possibly coming up, and fast + reliable gear selection. When on the large chain ring, you can get caught out by a short (or long), steep uphill, and not be able to get a low enough gear to ...


4

By looking at the current frame geometry at http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-gb/bikes/model/anthem.x4/7865/45505/#geometry we can assume the following. Descending: HA: 71 degrees head angle is pretty steep for downhill but for flowy singetracks it will be good. For the "steepish rocky tracks" it really depends on what you consider steep. Anything more ...


3

A good quality bike tire usually has a better size tolerance, a better rubber compound (might make more difference on traction than thread geometry itself), a better seating on the rim, and a better "feel" - the tyre carcass reacts better to bumps and curves, have a good cushioning effect and a good rolling resistance. I'd say there is a perceiveably ...


3

In the shortest way of answering this, yes, they will be suitable for trail/xc use. All flat pedals are relatively the same. They only differ in the amount of pins, contact area, weight and their thickness. You'll want something on the thin side for trail use, as you'll be pedaling quite a bit more than if you were on a downhill bike. This will help to ...


3

Note : this is mostly based on my personal experience. Its an incredibly subjective subject, so there is no right answer. Keep in mind that in reality one level up or down will be completely unnoticeable performance difference to most riders. XT is considered the "Sweat spot" for performance, weight and durability. Probably X9 in the SRAM range. XTR and ...


3

Are you riding too light on the front wheel? Have a look at you riding style - are you loading the front wheel into corners? If you are not, then the shocks will feel too hard (front wheel will bounce). Maybe this is the problem. If you get a chance, get someone who rides a lot to have a look at your riding, ideally get some coaching. If your style is ...


2

Those tyres look a little aggressive for dry, hard pack XC riding to me. I ride XC in Australia and use Maxxis Crossmark, they are a great tyre for this type of terrain. As for loosing grip when climbimg, try to stay seated but slide forward onto the nose of the saddle to shift your weight slightly to the front. This will help keep weight on the back tyre ...


2

I had the same question a few years ago. The answer is I think subjective but I came to the conclusion that the same thing goes with clothing as with components. I reached that conclusion by the "suck it and see" approach. I basically started off along the thought process that winter clothing was more important than summer clothing. By that I mean that you ...


2

The easy method is to use cable ties and route it where you like. Remember to add Biketape (transparent frame protection tape, aka helitape) to prevent the cable rubbing the paint off your frame etc.


2

It partially depends on where the cable comes out of the post. If it's from the top you can route the cable across the bottom of the top tube and up to the handle bar or down the seat tube and up the down tube. On the other hand, if the cable comes out of the bottom of the post, you can try to go out the bottom of the seat tube and up the down tube. What is ...


1

You might check http://bike.shimano.com/ and http://www.sram.com to get somewhat familiar with the names of the components and which might be a bit better. For the most part something just better than the entry level components will be good. For Shimano Deore is would be a good level to start. I'm not sure on SRAM. This probably won't be your last bike so no ...


1

A cross country with a lockout would be decent commuter. Probably the best mountain style for the road. I would put small block tires on it. They would have better grip, smoother roll, and longer life on pavement. On the trail they do fine on hard pack and rock. A knobby would be better on mud. Full lockout is nice for the street but don't eliminate the ...


1

An XC MTB should certainly be workable for what you want. Depending on the trails and your skill level a cyclo-cross bike would also be a reasonable choice as well. There are lot's of bikes like this on the market now. http://www.konaworld.com/jake_the_snake.cfm If the trails are mostly packed dirt with few rocks, then a CX bike works pretty well off ...


1

Assuming that all of the receiving sizes are the same, then yes. Technically you can put parts sized for different wheel sizes on a frame meant for a specific wheel size (ala 69ers), but keep in mind that it will change the bike's handling and geometry. Fork: If both are 1 1/8" or both tapered then you can. Keep in mind that the head tube of the new frame ...



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