731 reputation
515
bio website
location Düsseldorf, Germany
age 40
visits member for 4 years, 2 months
seen Apr 7 at 22:18
Software developer, mathematician

Jan
29
comment Why are battery-powered lights so popular?
My experience is that with a good dynamo and lights, and with proper wiring (good wire, proper connectors [implying lights that have connectors] and careful fastening of the wire to the frame), a dynamo system can be quite reliable. My bike is constantly in the rain and parked and handled a lot, and I rarely have connection problems (maybe once a year). But of course this may depend on the specific situation. The wiring is certainly an added risk compared to battery-powered lights.
Jan
28
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
28
comment Why are battery-powered lights so popular?
Why does a mountain bike need a through-axle? Can't you just use a hub dynamo with a solid (but robust) axle?
Jan
28
comment Why are battery-powered lights so popular?
That's the point - with a reliable commuter bike, you don't necessarily need spare tube and inflator (at least I don't need them), so having to carry a spare battery pack is an extra nuisance. And I have used dynamos (both hub and side wheel) for years and never needed to clean/grease them.
Jan
28
comment Why are battery-powered lights so popular?
Also, you can get a dynamo for way less than $250. A decent side wheel dynamo is around $20-$30, a dynamos are around $50-$250, plus new wheel (prices from Germany, in US $).
Jan
28
comment Why are battery-powered lights so popular?
Good point. However, this ignores the fact that dynamo lighting may require less maintenance, because there's no need to change batteries, ever, thus no risk of a battery going flat at an inconvenient moment. Whether or not this is a problem depends on how and when the bike is used.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Sep
19
comment Hill riding: What gears are usually the most comfortable?
Also, higher load means more strain on the joints (particularly the knees), which can cause permanent damage.
Jun
9
comment Broken glass on the bicycle path, what to do?
@DavidMulder: True, but usually (at least in Germany) there are exceptions if the cycle path is "unusable" (due to ice, snow, debris, construction...). "full of glass" might count as an excuse (I'm not a lawyer, though).
Apr
11
comment Do Kevlar Belts really offer puncture protection?
Also see: What type of tires can prevent goatheads?.
Mar
10
awarded  Constituent
Mar
8
comment My lock was rusty and key snapped while trying to unlock bike so now its permanently locked
You'll probably need to open the lock by force. Please edit your question to indicate the type (ideally the model) of the lock.
Mar
3
awarded  Caucus
Feb
8
awarded  Yearling
Jan
22
comment Anti-puncture options
Also, you should always pack a spare inner tube. That way, you can quickly fix the flat by changing the tube. Then you can later patch the puncture at your leisure in dry conditions and use the repaired tube as the new spare.
Jan
22
comment Anti-puncture options
Also see: What type of tires can prevent goatheads? for puncture-resistant tires.
Dec
31
comment Periodic Maintenance Task for Bike Commuters
@Batman: Yes, and so is a complete tear down. I've used bikes for years without ever tearing them down completely. Also, on modern bikes most bearings are not serviceable anyway (unlike old bearings, where this made sense).
Dec
31
comment Periodic Maintenance Task for Bike Commuters
Related question: Practical cleaning routine for a commuter bike
Sep
26
answered Which public transport networks allow you to transport a bike?