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Jul
11
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
19
comment One Month to Build Endurance
The problem is, I don't feel like I have a great base. :(
Jun
19
comment One Month to Build Endurance
I've actually bought a compact crankset a few days ago for exactly this reason. Thanks!
Jun
19
comment One Month to Build Endurance
I want to complete these climbs at as fast a speed as I am capable, seven days back to back to back. I'll be with other riders, but outside of competitive spirit, the climbs will be at each rider's individual pace. We regroup at the summit of each climb.
Jun
18
asked One Month to Build Endurance
Jun
17
comment I don't want to be the next Eddy Merckx; Is competitive cycling right for me?
The answer to that is, really, "be sociable". Meet people. Did you like them? See them again. :P No sport has a monopoly on a supportive community, nor are the communities surrounding a given sport the same between towns, states, regions, or countries. Go do things you think are or might be fun. If you meet cool people, great.
Jun
17
answered I don't want to be the next Eddy Merckx; Is competitive cycling right for me?
Jun
11
comment Validity of UCI motor concerns
Even the smaller one (at 110Wh for 4lb) would be an incredible help. Two hours of an additional 50W (around 27W/kg, compared to an elite rider who can sustain less than 7W/kg for long climbs) could easily be the difference between a pack finish and winning a race.
Jun
11
comment Validity of UCI motor concerns
A weight test wouldn't suffice. Bikes already frequently weigh less than UCI regulations, but weights are dropped into the seat tube to meet the minimum. Per the article linked by @altomnr, a motor and battery capable of delivering 165Wh of energy can be had for under 5lb. The UCI limit is 15lb, but carbon fiber racing bikes weighing under 10lb can be bought today. A rider could easily use the motor just for climbs (offsetting its weight), and disable it on the flats where the extra weight is of no consequence.
Jun
3
comment Do certain makes/models/types of bikes get stolen more than others?
The most commonly-stolen type of bike is an unlocked one, followed closely by one locked with a cable.
Jun
2
comment Fundamental principles of tire friction for off-road biking
Maybe you're just not pedaling hard enough, @Kibbee :)
May
22
awarded  Nice Question
May
17
comment Training involved to ride 175 miles in a day
Also, working up to longer distances will quickly let you know if you have a fit issue on your bike.
May
13
comment Training involved to ride 175 miles in a day
There's no need to act like a child just because somebody has (justifiably) criticized your answer. The point stands that virtually none of the thousands of people who ride in supported double centuries each year train at the level you suggest, except the very few who treat them as highly competitive events. Even 20 hours a week is likely more than the vast majority of finishers. Given the long tail of power curves, a 200 mile event does not require substantially more fitness than a 100 mile one. Comfort is a far bigger factor.
May
13
comment Training involved to ride 175 miles in a day
I've never in my life trained for 30 hours a week. Nor have probably 95% of the people who complete supported double centuries. Neither starting in shape nor out of shape necessitate 30 hour training weeks for such an event. That kind of load would only be remotely necessary if you were attempting to finish in an extremely competitive time. OP could easily be ready for this event in time for next year, and could plausibly be ready this year (depending exactly on how out of shape he is) by riding 2 to 3 times a week (maybe 10 hours total), with 80mi+ rides on the weekends.
May
13
comment Training involved to ride 175 miles in a day
Training 30 hours a week for a 175mi ride? Absolutely, totally, 100% ridiculous. If you can ride a century, you can ride a double — just take it at a reasonable pace. For instance, last year, I did a double (in 11h on the bike) after less than 30 hours a month of just riding for fun. And I'm not some kind of genetic freak.
May
5
comment Could someone help me identify this bike?
The only measure of a bike being a good investment is if the happiness it brings you to ride it was worth the cost. If you need to know the original manufacturer in order to decide whether or not you're satisfied with the purchase (and you're not a collector or something), you're doing it wrong. Stop worrying about who built your bike and go have fun riding it.
May
3
awarded  Yearling
Mar
31
awarded  Taxonomist
Mar
30
comment How many miles of riding require the same effort as one mile of running?
This is a great answer. I do have one issue with comparing running to cycling times in an Ironman: fatigue! Running comes after cycling, so it is natural to assume that the contestant will be running at a slower pace relative to cycling than they would were the two events reversed. That said, this is probably mitigated somewhat by the significant endurance requirement (it's probably better strategy to maintain as equal effort as possible across both events). It would also be interesting to consider the ratio for both sprinting and endurance distances.