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 Yearling
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May
17
comment Training involved to ride 175 miles in a day
Also, working up to longer distances will quickly let you know if you have a fit issue on your bike.
May
13
comment Training involved to ride 175 miles in a day
There's no need to act like a child just because somebody has (justifiably) criticized your answer. The point stands that virtually none of the thousands of people who ride in supported double centuries each year train at the level you suggest, except the very few who treat them as highly competitive events. Even 20 hours a week is likely more than the vast majority of finishers. Given the long tail of power curves, a 200 mile event does not require substantially more fitness than a 100 mile one. Comfort is a far bigger factor.
May
13
comment Training involved to ride 175 miles in a day
I've never in my life trained for 30 hours a week. Nor have probably 95% of the people who complete supported double centuries. Neither starting in shape nor out of shape necessitate 30 hour training weeks for such an event. That kind of load would only be remotely necessary if you were attempting to finish in an extremely competitive time. OP could easily be ready for this event in time for next year, and could plausibly be ready this year (depending exactly on how out of shape he is) by riding 2 to 3 times a week (maybe 10 hours total), with 80mi+ rides on the weekends.
May
13
comment Training involved to ride 175 miles in a day
Training 30 hours a week for a 175mi ride? Absolutely, totally, 100% ridiculous. If you can ride a century, you can ride a double — just take it at a reasonable pace. For instance, last year, I did a double (in 11h on the bike) after less than 30 hours a month of just riding for fun. And I'm not some kind of genetic freak.
May
5
comment Could someone help me identify this bike?
The only measure of a bike being a good investment is if the happiness it brings you to ride it was worth the cost. If you need to know the original manufacturer in order to decide whether or not you're satisfied with the purchase (and you're not a collector or something), you're doing it wrong. Stop worrying about who built your bike and go have fun riding it.
May
3
awarded  Yearling
Mar
31
awarded  Taxonomist
Mar
30
comment How many miles of riding require the same effort as one mile of running?
This is a great answer. I do have one issue with comparing running to cycling times in an Ironman: fatigue! Running comes after cycling, so it is natural to assume that the contestant will be running at a slower pace relative to cycling than they would were the two events reversed. That said, this is probably mitigated somewhat by the significant endurance requirement (it's probably better strategy to maintain as equal effort as possible across both events). It would also be interesting to consider the ratio for both sprinting and endurance distances.
Mar
24
comment From Delft to Rotterdam - Hard?
That's precisely why I said it will be easy for a 15km ride. I don't know your physical condition, so I can't say whether or not you, specifically will find it easy. But I can say that if you're going to go on a 15km ride, this will be one of the easiest. Even for a beginner, 15km is really not that far — it will probably take you on the order of an hour or so. But it depends on how hard you push yourself. It could range from anywhere between a lazy 2 hour jaunt where you barely feel exerted, to a 20-minute balls-to-the-wall hammerfest.
Mar
24
answered From Delft to Rotterdam - Hard?
Mar
14
comment Is it possible to shorten a chain?
Not if you plan to use your front derailleur.
Jan
23
comment What does chain worn indicators 75% mean?
To clarify a bit, replacing your chain before it is completely worn is what will prevent your more expensive components like front chainrings and your cassette from needing to be replaced.
Dec
14
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
3
comment What are the practical limitations of a road bike compared to a mountain bike?
It's also probably a function of the amount of money invested in that bike. I wouldn't give a shit hopping curbs on a $70 MTB; worst case scenario, I need to buy another $70 MTB. On a $1,000 road bike, if I taco my wheel I might be out $200 just for that one component. People tend to take better care of their nicer possessions.
Oct
30
comment cars and scooters in a road bike race
Motorcycles aren't exactly mixed in with the cyclists; they don't ride in the peloton. They typically will ride off the front or back of the peloton (there's usually not room on the sides, as the peloton will widen to occupy the entire road). For breakaway groups, they have a bit more freedom to ride parallel to the paceline. You answer seemed easy to misconstrue as motorcyclists being allowed to actually ride in the peloton or in pacelines.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
28
comment Is it realistic to fuel a long ride with NO sugar?
There's not a direct conversion between calories to watts. 800kcal/hr is way beyond plausible — typical rates, even for a hard ride, is somewhere around 300kcal/hr.
Sep
28
comment Is it realistic to fuel a long ride with NO sugar?
FWIW, whole grains basically are sugars. Do you mean no added sugars, or no carbohydrates whatsoever?
Jul
30
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
2
awarded  Curious