7,473 reputation
22036
bio website darkcanuck.net
location Ottawa, Canada
age 40
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
seen Aug 8 '11 at 21:33

Jerome Lavigne is a commuter, tourer and randonneur.

Currently riding a steel Marinoni Sportivo with Shimano Ultegra up front and XT in the back, no-nonsense 32-spoke DT swiss wheels with 28mm Armadillo tires, plus dynamo hub lighting and a Brooks B-17 saddle for that randonneur look.

Formerly a resident of Vancouver, BC, he has traded the long, wet west coast cycling season for the much shorter but drier season in eastern Canada.


Mar
7
comment Correct way to pedal
It's much more likely that your frame broke for another reason, rather than pedaling style. Broken frames are not uncommon and can be caused by manufacturing defects, wear & tear, or weakness caused by previous crashes. The poster of the linked question has broken 4 frames all in the same area. Where did your frame break?
Mar
6
revised When to change derailleur pulleys?
changed derailleur "wheels" to "pulleys"
Mar
6
comment When to change derailleur pulleys?
+1 that's a nice link. I agree that unless there's excessive tooth wear (not the case based on the pictures) or friction in the bearings (take off the chain and the pulleys should spin freely) then there's no point replacing these.
Mar
3
comment Replace Brompton folding pedal - what tool is needed?
@Neil - it's likely current, saw some folding pedal replacement bolts for sale that have 24mm hex heads.
Mar
3
comment Replace Brompton folding pedal - what tool is needed?
@Neil: don't confuse a 24mm socket with an allen key... you're not likely to find bolts on any bicycle that need such a large key!
Feb
28
awarded  Convention
Feb
27
comment Explaining the effects of frame geometries
Just wanted to point out that the frame has a big impact on how the bike fits the rider (you mentioned it was "superficial"). You can indeed make many small adjustments to adjust the fit of any frame, but at some point the frame is going to limit how well you fit the bike. Too small a frame and you won't be able to get a long enough stem, long enough seat post or enough seat setback, and toe overlap becomes a bigger problem. Too large has the opposite problem.
Feb
26
comment What are important items for a touring first-aid kit?
Yes, this stuff is amazing. Some helpful German tourists patched me up with this after a bad touring crash. Allowed my wounds to heal but still flexible enough to let me keep riding.
Feb
26
comment Fixie Rear Wheel Slippage Problem
@Ben, my apologies, I thought you were taking moments using the axle as the center (so it wouldn't even enter the equation). I get your formula now and it makes sense, interesting how the chain tension is factored out so easily. Can you really model a chain as a single tangential force at the top of the cog? In practice, the chain tension is spread across every tooth that contacts the chain...
Feb
25
revised What kinds of kickstands are good for touring?
clarifed #1
Feb
25
answered What kinds of kickstands are good for touring?
Feb
25
comment What kinds of kickstands are good for touring?
@hhh: this is much better! It could be clarified a bit more, but now I understand what you're asking. I cannot figure out how to remove my close vote, however...
Feb
25
comment What kinds of kickstands are good for touring?
@hhh: there are many kinds of stands, the type of bike it will be attached to and how that bike is used will help guide a good answer. As it is, your question asks to compare all of the types of stands without trying to solve a particular problem. The examples help, but it is not clear what you want. Something for maintenance on a cyclocross bike (in between races)? A heavy duty stand that can hold up a loaded city bike? Those are two very different uses and will generate very different answers. Just like there is no single perfect bike, there is no perfect kickstand.
Feb
25
comment Fixie Rear Wheel Slippage Problem
@Ben: you can't solve this using moments. You need to find the force applied at the axle in the forward direction of the bike (causing the axle to move relative to the frame). Once this force exceeds the clamping force of the axle nut(s), the axle will shift forward.
Feb
25
comment What kinds of kickstands are good for touring?
What problem are you trying to solve?
Feb
25
comment Fixie Rear Wheel Slippage Problem
@ChrisW: only if the front ring remains the same size (with the same force on the pedals). If the gearing remains constant or you still keep mashing the pedals just as hard then the chain tension will be the same. This answer would be perfect if point 5 was removed.
Feb
24
comment Fixie Rear Wheel Slippage Problem
There's some confusion here about tension. At rest, we're trying to minimize chain slack; bigger rings/cogs will help to reduce this. But under power, if you increase the ring+cog but keep the gear ratio the same, the axle will still experience the same amount of pull regardless; only reducing the gear ratio will reduce the pull.
Feb
23
comment What does self-support mean during touring?
@hhh: One big summary is better for the StackExchange format. Approved & highly ranked answers drift to the top of the list, so if you split up an answer, sections with few votes may not get viewed by someone interested in the topic. If the answers are too massive, then the question is too broad. Try to ask focused questions that can be answered in a reasonable amount of space. If you want information about transporting your bike, ask "What is the best way to travel with my bike from A to Z?" and list some of your criteria in the question body.
Feb
23
comment What does self-support mean during touring?
@hhh: Moz has provided a very good answer, I don't see why you would break it up into 5 separate answers? Consolidating multiple answers into one improved answer makes sense, but not the reverse.
Feb
23
comment What does self-support mean during touring?
+1 Moz, you've obviously done some serious touring. The long sleeves is a good tip, I developed a permanent allergy to ordinary sunscreen after a 2-month tour.