31,740 reputation
13083
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location Minnesota, USA
age
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen 2 hours ago

Old, tired, crazy.


2h
answered Can I replace my bicycles dynamo with batteries?
6h
comment How to fix V-brakes
If the cable fixing bolt is tight and the "noodle" (curved metal tube) has it's end properly nestled in the notch of the floppy metal "U" shaped piece then the brake should work. If not then the cable is not properly adjusted or there is something loose somewhere else.
18h
comment difficulty inflating my bike tire
On a Presta I always give the valve end a tap after unscrewing it, to make sure it releases a "pfft" of air. This loosens the rubber seal inside if it's stuck, and it makes sure you have the knobbie thing unscrewed far enough.
22h
comment Can I replace my bicycles dynamo with batteries?
As RoboKaren indicates, most dynamos are AC. The LED lamps may be designed such that they depend on having AC, or may just blindly rectify the "juice" such that they won't notice that it's DC. One tricky issue is whether they depend on having AC to perform voltage regulation (not unlikely given that a dynamo has such variable output). If they depend on AC to enable the regulator then they may well self-destruct when powered with DC.
1d
comment Can I replace my bicycles dynamo with batteries?
(BTW, rechargeable penlight batteries are a PITA. And keep in mind that they run about 1.2v each.)
1d
comment Can I replace my bicycles dynamo with batteries?
If the lamps were old-fashioned incandescent lamps it would be simpler -- you'd just need to match the battery voltage to the RMS output of the dyno. But with LEDs it's harder to say. Probably you could use batteries of approximately the same voltage, but it might not work, and it might set the whole bike (OK, only the lamp socket) afire.
1d
comment 2,600km on an 8 speed bike?
@Blam - Actually I think he should purchase it legitimately. ;)
1d
comment 2,600km on an 8 speed bike?
I'd say 200km a day is overly ambitious. 100km would be more realistic.
1d
comment Annual technology gap of high end road bikes
@Blam - Just the fact that hobbyists have been making electric shifters for years.
1d
comment Annual technology gap of high end road bikes
An electric shifting system is simpler and likely lighter than mechanical, and hobbyists have been building them for at least 5 years. The added cost is probably about $50 currently and would drop to negative once volumes get up there. There are very few reasons (other than Shimano blocking the way) why all bikes would not be electric shift in a few years.
1d
comment Damaged (scraped) tire - what to do?
If the cut were to open up and he got a blowout it should still be possible to "boot" the tire (usually a relatively new dollar bill, folded twice, works well for this). But of course that would require some skill the OP likely does not have.
1d
comment Damaged (scraped) tire - what to do?
Impossible to tell for sure, but it does not appear to be a serious cut. Unless you're in a situation where you must avoid a flat if at all possible, I wouldn't worry about it.
1d
comment Annual technology gap of high end road bikes
@DWGKNZ - What R&D cost? The R&D was done by hobbyists.
1d
comment Annual technology gap of high end road bikes
(I would guess Shimano can make electric shifters for at most $50 more than mechanical ones.)
1d
comment Annual technology gap of high end road bikes
You will see electric shifters on Wally World bikes within 5 years (probably sooner). Then the price for decent quality ones on decent quality bikes will drop to a reasonable level.
1d
comment Annual technology gap of high end road bikes
The only advancement in technology for the past 5 years or so has been electric shifting.
2d
comment What's the lowest safe cadence on a climb?
@R.Chung - I don't know how you'd be able to calculate the maximal force, since even the best cyclist's stroke is not smooth, especially at low RPM. You might calculate, say, RMS force, but that could easily be off by 2-3x.
2d
comment How to inflate a tire with a Presta valve?
There is no need to depress the stem in a Presta valve, since air pressure will open the valve when the pump develops more pressure than is inside the tire. All that's necessary is to briefly tap the stem before putting on the chuck, to make sure that the rubber gasket is not stuck closed.
2d
comment How to inflate a tire with a Presta valve?
The purpose of the threaded stem and nut is to hold the stem out so you don't have to do the thumb thing.
2d
comment Solid rubber bicycle tires
Also note that there are several different technologies that produce tires that are far less prone to puncture (like 10x to 100x less) than are the standard tires that came with your bike.