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13295
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location Minnesota, USA
age
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 6 mins ago

Old, tired, crazy.


2h
comment Convenient bike-security measures for rural, small-town, and remote-touring environments
See this answer: bicycles.stackexchange.com/a/8683/1584
2h
comment Convenient bike-security measures for rural, small-town, and remote-touring environments
I've been riding bikes in a rural/suburban environment for 40 years. I've gone on about 15 week-long bike rides with typically 100-150 other cyclists through much of the US Midwest -- small towns and medium-sized cities. In that time I've never had a bike stolen, and only 3 bikes in our group were stolen. (One was left unlocked, outside a bar. The other two were unlocked at the campsite.) All I've ever used is a lightweight cable with a padlock -- that's enough to discourage "opportunistic" thieves.
12h
comment DIY: what material to use as DIY shim seat post?
When you get the shim in place, make sure there's at least 1/4" or so showing above the top of the tube, then use a thin screwdriver to bend the top of the shim outward, to make a "lip" that will help keep it from falling into the tube.
12h
comment DIY: what material to use as DIY shim seat post?
Aluminum is easier to work with and "conforms", making it a better shim in most case. Steel will take wear a bit better in cases where the fit is poor. Aluminum will "stick" to steel in a way, which is probably good, to keep it from sliding around when you want it to stay put.
12h
comment DIY: what material to use as DIY shim seat post?
I would go with the pop/beer can. Among other things, the thickness of the metal varies with the height along the side of the can, so you can customize the thickness. And paper/cardboard will compress too easily and make a lousy shim.
1d
comment How to remove a stuck seatpost?
Also see this Sheldon Brown article.
1d
comment How to remove a stuck seatpost?
(It should be noted that there is NO standardization in seatpost diameters. They come in about 0.2mm increments from around 25mm to 32mm. You can usually fit a post that is +/- 0.5mm or so from the tube size, but beyond that you have problems such as we see here.)
1d
comment How to remove a stuck seatpost?
The wrong size seat post has been jammed (likely hammered) into the tube. You would start by using a penetrating oil, prying apart the lugs slightly (but be careful to not overdo it, more penetrating oil, then twist (likely with a pipe wrench) back and forth while pulling with all your might. (Probably you should somehow prop the bike up on a makeshift stand -- eg, clamp to to a heavy picnic table.)
1d
comment Pain on pinky toe joint from cleat setup?
Probably your shoes are a hair too narrow.
1d
comment Visual inspection of wheel hub
Yes, you can disassemble the hubs while still attached to spokes and wheel. But generally disassembly is not necessary to assess general hub condition, as you can "feel" the condition fairly easily. (You do of course have to disassemble to lubricate.) When examining a disassembled hub you mainly inspect the cones and races for any sign of scoring or pitting.
1d
comment Peer pressure in road cycling
I find that I can usually duck behind a bush and relieve my peer pressure.
1d
comment What kind of portable pump should I carry when riding on a fat bike?
You definitely don't want one of the cheapie mini-pumps -- they take forever even with a skinny tire. You might want to consider CO2 cartridges instead (though you should use larger than normal cartridges).
Mar
23
comment Refurbishing mountain bike - left standing for couple of years
That should be fine. Check the bearings (as you should do occasionally with any bike) for play and for any sign of sticking/"indexing", but no need to repack them unless the check shows a problem. As to the brake fluid, it depends a lot on whether there may have been high humidity and condensation which somehow got into the fluid (and it depends on the type of fluid). (And there's also a chance the brake calipers may be sticky to start with, so give them time to "break in" before going hot-dogging.)
Mar
23
comment Refurbishing mountain bike - left standing for couple of years
The chain should be cleaned and lubed, of course, and possibly the hydraulic brake fluid should be changed/flushed. And you need to carefully inspect the tires for signs of rot. The bearings should be fine unless it got excessively hot in the garage for long periods.
Mar
23
comment Haro frame identification
You have a frame. If you're really blessed it might be worth $100. If less lucky you might be looking at $10. (Consider where "frames" come from: They are bikes that people removed parts from to put them onto other bikes.)
Mar
23
comment Refurbishing mountain bike - left standing for couple of years
Standing where? Inside in a dry, heated area, in poorly sealed a shed or lean-to, or outside in the weather?
Mar
21
comment Wheels keep getting buckled
In all my riding (I'd guess 20K miles total) I've only had a wheel buckle once, when I had my rear wheel slide out from under me on a curve.
Mar
21
comment Wheels keep getting buckled
You have a problem. Either the wheels you're getting are very poorly assembled, or you are somehow subjecting them to extreme forces (perhaps due to a fault of some sort in the bike frame). Simply having a pannier on only one side would not cause this. (You need to describe a bit better what happens when they "buckle" -- eg, do spokes break?)
Mar
21
comment Peer pressure in road cycling
Clipless pedals do help. Short of that you can use toe straps with the shoes you have.
Mar
21
comment What are the good ways to maintain the bicycle while raining season?
Mainly, keep the chain oiled. For wet weather you should ask for a "wet" chain lubricant at the bike shop, though a plain heavy motor oil will work. Be sure to wipe the chain with a rag before applying new oil.