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Jun
22
comment What are the benefits of nickel-plated chains?
Well, that's not what the blurb says.
Jun
22
comment Bottom bracket cup doesn't fit on non drive side
First, does the cup not fit at all, or does it simply not thread in all the way? If it doesn't fit at all, have you verified that the threads on both cup and bracket housing are right-hand? Where did you get the new BB from?
Jun
22
comment What are the benefits of nickel-plated chains?
Pretty much all purpose-made chain lubes provide some degree of "coating" that would prevent corrosion. Dumonde Tech says "Plating bonds to chain; can’t be washed off!"
Jun
22
comment What are the benefits of nickel-plated chains?
Mostly looks. The nickle will prevent corrosion, but a chains should be sufficiently well lubed that corrosion isn't a problem anyway. In theory the nickle might reduce friction slightly, but that assumes that the parts you can't see are also plated, and even then the benefit would be slight.
Jun
21
comment In which orientation should a front wheel be installed?
With regard to skewer lever orientation, I heard many years ago of a case where someone drafting managed to (quite unintentionally) get their tire behind the rear lever of the bike ahead and flip it open, causing the wheel to come loose. And of course the same problem can occur when riding by a bush or whatever if the lever points forward. So probably upward is best both front and rear.
Jun
21
comment How do you distinguish a touring bike from a speed/road bike?
@Kibbee - Good point!
Jun
21
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
21
revised How do you distinguish a touring bike from a speed/road bike?
added 138 characters in body
Jun
21
answered How do you distinguish a touring bike from a speed/road bike?
Jun
21
comment How can I remove the bottom bracket from this old road bike?
I'm doubtful whether most bike shops are any better equipped to handle these than you are. You might check with a local motor shop to see if they have a press that can handle the frame.
Jun
21
comment What type of tires have tubes inside?
It sounds to me like you have what is commonly (though somewhat mistakenly) referred to as a "clincher" -- the upper-left picture in James's answer. This is the most common style by far -- probably 99% of the bikes in the US use this style.
Jun
21
comment What type of tires have tubes inside?
The other possibility, of course, is tubeless -- basically the first picture but with no tube inside (but probably some sealing goo).
Jun
21
comment How can I remove the bottom bracket from this old road bike?
Yeah, that appears to be an early "sealed" cartridge bearing. You've only removed the grease seal. You'll likely have to drive it out, and finding a replacement will be problematic (though the bearings may turn out to be standard-sized industrial bearings that your local electric motor rebuilder can find for you). (Be careful not to bung up the crank end, since you'll need to save the crank.)
Jun
21
comment rebuild shimano wheel
@PeteH - "Loose" rims and other wheel parts are not as readily available as they once were -- it's cheaper to buy a new wheel in most cases, so there's little market -- but they're still easy to find. Other wheelsets are often a hybrid of, say, Mavic rims, DT spokes, and (probably) Shimano hubs, built to the bike manufacturer's specs.
Jun
21
comment rebuild shimano wheel
Probably cheaper/better to just order a new wheel. Save the old for spare parts.
Jun
21
comment Why aren't average speeds computed over distance?
It would at least likely match the algorithm used within Expresso exercise bikes when stating the speed of the "pacer".
Jun
20
comment Where do stolen bikes go?
A little bit of everything, I suspect. I have heard of people finding their bikes (and other stolen goods) on Craig's list.
Jun
20
comment Differences between symetrical and asymetrical brake pads for cantilever / v-brakes
I think the theory is that the "long tail" pads require less "toe in" to prevent grabbing and squeal.