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Apr
1
answered “Creaking” noise from headtube/handlebar
Mar
31
comment How do you use a power meter to pace yourself during steep hill time trial events?
I'm not much for climbing, but my inclination would be to use the power meter to set your basic pace, and then not try to stay at an "ideal" power level continuously, but let your power fluctuate based on the slope. This gives you a bit of a break on the "easy" parts, letting you recuperate a bit between more difficult segments. Just check your average power from time to time so that you average out near your target for the overall run. But a climber I'm not.
Mar
31
comment Is it a good idea to switch to hub gear?
I seriously doubt that wheel removal would be simplified. And you would still want to clean/oil the chain at about the same interval as you do now.
Mar
31
comment Fork shakes on braking
Check that there's no play in the headset bearings. If that's OK the pads probably need to be "toed in".
Mar
30
comment Bike for mixed use
@ChrisH - Drop bars are a sort of acquired taste, and it takes the right bar and some careful adjustment to get it all right (or as close to right as you can hope for). I think most folks only ride on the drops in a sprint, and spend the rest of the time alternating between the hoods and the top bar. One of the advantages of the drop bar is the variety of positions relative to a straight bar.
Mar
30
comment Bike for mixed use
@robin59718 - Which takes us back to my original point: You won't really know what sort of bike you want until you've been riding for a few months. It's not worth it trying to find the "perfect" bike now, nor is it a good investment to spend a lot on a bike you may not find suitable a year from now.
Mar
29
comment Will my bike hold my weight?
@user10730 - Re the "butt burn", a little secret is that much of that is due to the hairs down there getting pulled out by the roots from friction. Eventually they're all gone (this is what really "toughens" your butt), but you can sidestep the issue a bit by (carefully!) shaving the area.
Mar
29
comment Bike for mixed use
My usual recommendation is "used". For starters, until you figure out what kind of rider you want to be, you just want a decent fit and moderate comfort. For light gravel tires should be on the wide side -- at least 30mm or so, and preferably 38-50mm (1.5-2.0"). Otherwise it doesn't matter much, but for your relatively lengthy rides you probably want to avoid a heavy bike or one with a fully upright posture.
Mar
29
comment installing a 700-18-23C tube on a bicycle
Remove the nut from the stem, install the tube, reinstall the nut. Don't overtighten -- just get it snug.
Mar
29
answered Will my bike hold my weight?
Mar
28
comment Magnetic trainer failure
@Kibbee - That is, assuming that the user can't dial down resistance to near zero.
Mar
28
comment Air suspension unit for relatively low mass
@ChrisH - For this application you'd want a little bit of damping -- a pure spring would cause the load to bounce up and down uncontrollably, and you'd likely see "resonance" on certain rough roads.
Mar
28
comment Air suspension unit for relatively low mass
@ChrisH - Yeah, and I just tossed it out as something to consider. Can't think of any obvious "ready made" solution to this problem.
Mar
28
comment Magnetic trainer failure
Hard to think of something (offhand) that would be simple, reliable, safe, and not easily disabled/removed.
Mar
28
comment Magnetic trainer failure
Nah, those balls swinging around would be more dangerous than the current setup. (Realistically, a governor is just one more thing to fail. Though I can see maybe a gizmo that made an annoying noise if you go too fast.)
Mar
28
comment Magnetic trainer failure
Of course, no one who isn't a TdF rider can realistically maintain 45 mph on the road for any extended period. If one is doing that speed on the trainer it's because they have the resistance set too low. (And one wonders why the CPSC hasn't raised a stink about trainers if they catastrophically fail so often.)
Mar
27
comment Magnetic trainer failure
It should be noted that 9500 rpm is not excessive for ordinary rotating equipment, so designing to handle stress at that speed should not be difficult. But also note the lower the resistance the higher the speed that can be achieved, so running a unit at very low resistance is apt to put more stress on it than running at a more realistic resistance. (And I'll repeat my statement that the machines should be designed so that any failure of a likely-to-fail component would be "contained" and not threaten injury to rider, bystanders, or nearby facilities.)
Mar
27
comment Magnetic trainer failure
It would be good if the OP provided us with his estimated speed at the time of failure, along with a rough estimate of his peak sustained speed overall while using the unit.
Mar
27
comment Air suspension unit for relatively low mass
@ChrisH - Gas struts come in a wide range of "strengths", and some are adjustable.
Mar
27
answered Air suspension unit for relatively low mass