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Mar
17
comment Bicycle Storage: Does Kvartal method need studs (or other suggestions)?
In the US it would be normal to have concrete block (CMU) "common walls" in an apartment/condo, for sound/fire reasons, but interior walls within a single residence are hardly ever concrete block unless someone had it done custom for some personal reason. And no electrician would ever inset a breaker panel into a block wall unless forced to at gunpoint.
Mar
17
comment Bicycle Storage: Does Kvartal method need studs (or other suggestions)?
Those will only work if there's concrete block behind the drywall, which is highly unlikely. The water pipes disappear into that wall and the beaker panel is inset into that wall, suggesting it's hollow, while the window is on a different wall, suggesting that the candidate wall is not an exterior wall.
Mar
16
comment Bicycle Storage: Does Kvartal method need studs (or other suggestions)?
Actually, on a second look at your link, I see the rear wheel is resting on the ground, so relatively little outward force would be applied to the wall. In that case the hollow wall anchors similar to what WTHarper suggests should be fine.
Mar
16
comment Bicycle Storage: Does Kvartal method need studs (or other suggestions)?
Your vertical hanger scheme is essentially what the OP was proposing.
Mar
16
comment Bicycle Storage: Does Kvartal method need studs (or other suggestions)?
That technique would need studs, since the bike will apply considerable outward force on the wall, such that hollow-wall anchors will eventually fail. Either use one of the "rail" systems that would allow you to anchor to studs, or use a piece of wood to accomplish the same thing.
Mar
15
comment Why do some triathlon seatposts go straight up and down instead of at an angle?
And keep in mind that the bike is exquisitely sized to the rider, such that only miniscule seat adjustments are apt to be required.
Mar
15
comment Type of cycle for losing weight and staying fit for a beginner
@PeteH - I weight north of 225 (we won't say how far north), and I can assure you that a well-constructed adult bike of any variety (other than hoity-toity racing bikes) can hand 240 with no trouble. The only real issue is the wheels and tires -- the wheels need to be good quality to prevent broken spokes, and the tires need to be at least modestly wide (>28mm or so) and properly inflated (meaning pressure of 80 psi or greater).
Mar
15
comment Type of cycle for losing weight and staying fit for a beginner
@Gaurav - With a back problem the main thing is to get a bike that fits you well. If the bike it too large for you or the handlebars too low you will have to lean forward too much (and this problem is aggravated by an excess of avoirdupois, since it's less comfortable to lean forward). But a too-small bike can force you to "crunch up" your midsection too much, so you really need that "happy medium".
Mar
15
answered Type of cycle for losing weight and staying fit for a beginner
Mar
14
comment looking for an entry level bike
It helps if it's a recognizable brand, but you're unlikely to recognize many perfectly good brands. One thing you can do is ask a cycling buddy to point out the things that identify a cheap bike, such as lots of plastic, crudely made "dropouts", one-piece cranks, steel stampings vs aluminum castings for handlebar mounts, etc. In fact, make a couple of trips to Target and a couple to a good bike shop and study the differences in bikes. Also, observe any congregation of bikes in a bike rack to pick out the better looking ones and see what you notice.
Mar
14
comment Bike lock bar jiggles in locked position — indicative of weakness?
Jiggle, within reason, is of no significance.
Mar
14
comment looking for an entry level bike
And, of course, one should always ask friends and neighbors if they know of a bike that's not being used. There are millions of bikes sitting in the backs of garages, collecting dust.
Mar
14
comment looking for an entry level bike
@Batman - If you check Craig's List, garage sales, etc, you will find a number of bikes quite reasonably priced. I just checked Craig's list for our area (county population 145K) and saw a couple of nice bikes at $50 and about ten below $150. And keep in mind that many of those are "best offer" and can be talked down if you have cash in hand.
Mar
13
comment looking for an entry level bike
See this article: bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/9948/…
Mar
13
comment looking for an entry level bike
Find a used bike. If you have a cyclist buddy, have him help you pick out a good one, but likely you can find something for $50 or so, so even if your first try isn't the best, it's still a fair investment. (Search here for some articles about how to evaluate a used bike.)
Mar
13
comment How to relate wind chill, temperature, and cycling
If the wind's 83 km/h I don't put anything on. Just turn up the heat and crawl into bed.
Mar
12
comment Transition between hybrid bike and endurance road bike
A stronger butt.
Mar
12
comment Making bicycle semi-motor powered
Heck, half the kids in my neighborhood did this when I was a kid. All it takes is an old horizontal shaft lawnmower motor, a plank of wood, and a hinge.
Mar
10
comment How to store a bike outside and still avoid rapid decay?
At first glance the Tidy Tent doesn't appear to allow sufficient ventilation to allow condensation to evaporate quickly.
Mar
10
comment Multi hour ride nutrition
@SoilSciGuy - You can figure that the body is about 20% efficient. So roughly calculate how many watts of power you're generating (100-200w steady for a cyclist in good condition), convert to kcal/hour (1 watt = 0.86 kcal/hour), and multiply times 5 to figure calories per hour.