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Nov
14
comment Can bicycling cause runner's knee?
I'm not sure about your specific problem, but you can create a knee problem or aggravate an existing one by cycling with the seat too low and/or using too difficult a gear. And I can confirm that doing the right knee exercises can rather quickly bring a knee problem under control in many cases.
Nov
14
comment What are the consequences of riding a bicycle tire backwards?
One minor point: It's not ideal to change the orientation of a tire after it's been run a substantial distance (maybe 1000-2000 miles for a bike tire) since the tire tends to "take a set" based on it's rotation direction, and reversing the direction pulls the cords in the opposite direction. This isn't a major issue -- the effect on tire life is slight -- but it's something to think about.
Nov
14
comment What are the consequences of riding a bicycle tire backwards?
See this answer. For some tires there is a difference in traction with tires one way vs the other. This is mostly relevant in dirt or mud, vs dry pavement.
Nov
14
comment Why would one ever buy a 12-25 cassette when an 11-25 is available?
@Michael - Any momentum you "stored up" on that downhill will be lost to wind resistance in the first 30 seconds of the climb. In terms of "conservation of energy" it's a very bad deal.
Nov
14
comment Can heavy tires handle anything that the trail can offer?
There are various types of "belted" tires which are much more puncture-resistant than regular tires. But in general (there may be exceptions) the belts cover only the tread area, so they do not reduce the chance of sidewall punctures.
Nov
14
comment Chain really quite stretched, should I change cassette at the same time?
@PeteH - And don't forget the bustier and garter belt.
Nov
13
comment slow bike…is it the chain?
60PSI would be the minimum. Probably around 100 is a good number.
Nov
13
comment Chain really quite stretched, should I change cassette at the same time?
The cassette doesn't appear to be seriously worn to me. The way the chain is sitting at the top is what one would expect with a worn chain.
Nov
13
comment Shimano Revo Shift Gives No Clicks
Yeah, the word "friction" on the shifter is a clue.
Nov
13
comment Cycling computers fits on any wheel size?
Yes, it will fit. (Though note that in the docs that come with the computer your wheel may be listed as a 700x55c, or you may have to measure it yourself.)
Nov
13
comment Chain really quite stretched, should I change cassette at the same time?
Your local bike shop should have a tool for measuring the wear on the cassette. But at 2000 miles your cassette is unlikely to be badly worn -- I tend to expect closer to 5000 miles from a cassette (though running with a worn chain will wear one out faster).
Nov
13
comment slow bike…is it the chain?
A chain would have to be really bad to slow you down noticeably -- generally the chain will start skipping or jumping off well before friction becomes an issue. Certainly tires can make a difference, especially if heavily lugged and/or underinflated. Make sure your tires are inflated to near the "sidewall" pressure. For 25c this should be at least 60PSI. Also be aware that, in particular, the Schwalbe belted tires tend to have higher rolling resistance, due to the nature of their belts.
Nov
13
comment Combining flat bar and aerobar: Double stem setup or alternatives?
(But your link to Sheldon's 2-bar setup is a good one, relevant to the original question.)
Nov
13
comment Combining flat bar and aerobar: Double stem setup or alternatives?
For the brakes I'd suggest considering interrupter brake levers.
Nov
12
comment Do we really need another bike size?
Actually, 26" is 571, 597, 590, 584, and 559mm. Calling a wheel "26 inch" is not being at all specific. What "we" think of when "we" see "26 inch" depends on who "we" are and what kind of bikes "we" ride. But I've ranted enough about my pet peeve of constantly changing bike "standards". Folks are welcome to vote this question into oblivion.
Nov
12
comment Do we really need another bike size?
So why not call it 26?
Nov
12
comment Is it normal for a fixed gear bicycle's rear wheel to slip forward in its dropouts from time to time?
It's not clear that this would be a problem for a solid axle, since the retaining nuts are threaded on (vs using a skewer) and there can be inches of axle sticking out without affecting the holding power of the nuts.
Nov
12
comment Do we really need another bike size?
So why not call it a 650C? (And what, pray tell, is a "26er"? Especially given that a 650C is "26 x 1-1/2"?)
Nov
12
comment Removing bike interfaces to reduce likelyhood of theft?
I'll direct your attention here for an analysis of the various bicycle theft scenarios, and how much different anti-theft strategies apply to each.
Nov
12
comment Do we really need another bike size?
(If manufacturers would settle on about 4 standard wheel diameters for "adult" bikes the tire selection would be much better, among other things. As it is there are probably 10 sizes in "common" use, not counting "24 inch" and smaller bikes for kids. A bike shop is unlikely to carry more than one or two tires for a given size, other than 700C. At least for "29ers" they decided to use 700C rather than invent a new size or resurrect another old one.)