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location Minnesota, USA
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visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen 12 mins ago

Old, tired, crazy.


Feb
25
comment Front Fork Bent After Crash
@Kibbee - Yep, the standard spoked bike wheel is remarkably strong.
Feb
25
comment Front Fork Bent After Crash
I don't see the point in using a lathe. You would want to pad the post when you put it in a vise, though.
Feb
24
answered Ladies Western Flyer
Feb
24
comment Can you put disc brakes on road forks originally intended for calipers?
Even though I'm no great fan of disks, "Tyler's" story is an example of foolishness -- you should never ride your brakes on a long downhill. Not in a car, not on a bike.
Feb
24
comment Front Fork Bent After Crash
I knew a guy who ran into a parked car (in broad daylight!) and similarly bent his fork. The tire didn't quite touch the downtube (a few mm clearance). He rode it like that for months -- dunno what he eventually did.
Feb
24
comment Convert fixed gear to coaster bike
And it's wise to consider whether the frame is built to withstand the forces involved. Generally the arm is fixed to the chainstay, but a violent stop could rip loose a lightly-fastened chainstay. Not as big a problem as putting disks on a front fork not designed for disks, but the same basic concern.
Feb
24
comment Can you put disc brakes on road forks originally intended for calipers?
@trailmax - With difficulty. People have done it (especially in olden days when disk brakes were only available as a DIY project). Either you devise a clamp (there may be some on the market) or you weld tabs to the fork.
Feb
23
comment Thinking of getting a new chainset
I've never had that much trouble with square taper. The only real problem is assuring that they're tight.
Feb
23
comment Thinking of getting a new chainset
In terms of replacing a bottom bracket cartridge the critical factors are the width of the shell and the diameter and thread for the cups. Mostly (but not entirely) the cup diameter/thread is standard now, but there are several different common widths. Cups can be adjusted a little bit for a minor width mismatch, but it has to be close. (And, of course, all bets are off if you have some sort of exotic crank.)
Feb
23
comment How does one test the freewheel?
It may be that the ratchet cogs are sticking slightly, and the vibration of simply readying the bike to ride on the road frees them. Try bouncing the bike a few times before mounting the trainer, and see if it makes a difference. If this is the problem it's not a serious failure lurking, but lubing the ratchet mechanism may be wise. (But use care lubing -- there are many wrong ways to do it.)
Feb
23
comment Can you put disc brakes on road forks originally intended for calipers?
It's probably unwise to put a disk brake on a carbon fork that's not designed for disks. You'd have to clamp the brake caliper to the tine, and it would put undue stress on the carbon. Even with a steel fork it's a bit iffy.
Feb
23
comment Thinking of getting a new chainset
That depends. Have you ever replaced a bottom bracket?
Feb
23
comment How does one test the freewheel?
There is a certain amount of distance the sprocket must turn relative to the hub before the ratchet engages. This varies with the design of the ratchet mechanism -- some move very little, others maybe 1/4 revolution worst case. Note that you can also get what seems like slip with a freewheel, when a cluster has just been installed and has not yet screwed itself on tight. But this only occurs the first 3-4 times you put force on it. I can't think of any reason that any effect would be more obvious on the trainer, though.
Feb
22
comment Are v-brake pads compatible with cantilever brakes
There are some differences in the size/shape of mounting posts of different "generations" of pads, but the basic function and the geometry is the same regardless. There is some difference in the "optimal" pad characteristics depending on short vs long "pull", but nothing major.
Feb
22
comment How does one test the freewheel?
Yeah, basically 2 failure modes: 1) It doesn't freewheel when it should. 2) It does freewheel when it shouldn't. Of course there are degrees of each -- there could be significant drag while freewheeling, or there could be "slipping" when a driving force is applied. There should be none of either.
Feb
21
comment How do I determine current value of a used bicycle?
Keep in mind that a $1200 (list) bike will sell for $800 new at end of season.
Feb
21
comment Do the benefits of clipless pedals out weigh any danger they may pose the rider?
(But given the OP's traumatic incident, he's probably got a serious aversion to clips, and for psychological reasons clips are probably a bad idea for the near term.)
Feb
20
comment Replacing Crankset. Do I need to replace chain? Then do I need to replace cassette?
There is a tool for checking cassette wear. A reasonably-equipped bike shop should have one.
Feb
20
comment Do the benefits of clipless pedals out weigh any danger they may pose the rider?
@mattnz - He could be referring to either one, of course, and the answer would still be "yes". It's unlikely that you'll break bones, but one should have a basic level of skill before trying to use either toe clips or "clipless" pedals. The hazard is mostly that you tend to forget about them, come to a stop, and fall over rather inelegantly. Mostly an injury to pride, maybe a skinned knee. Vague possibility of a broken arm, worst case, if you stick your arm out to break your fall.
Feb
19
comment Different Gear Type when there's no Front Derailleur?
Much more significant than ramps and pins on the side (which is to say maybe actually significant) is the profiling of the teeth themselves. If you look in the above pictures you'll see that some teeth are sharp and some have flattened tops, and, of the sharp teeth, some tilt one direction and some the other. These are designed to give the chain a "kick" at the right point in a shift.