30,795 reputation
12978
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location Minnesota, USA
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen 12 hours ago

Old, tired, crazy.


Apr
14
comment How to replace old style cotter-pin bottom bracket with a modern one?
Yeah, the trick is to find the right BB bearing assembly, that is the right overall diameter and length and with the right threads on the cups. If you possibly can fit one in, a cartridge unit is better than loose bearings, but some of the old BB shells were pretty small diameter.
Apr
12
comment 1980's bike vs New(er) Models? (Should one stay with an ancient bike?)
Yeah, looking around it appears that about $700 ("list") is the starting point for a decent road/touring bike. Of course you can always try to bargain -- I'd bet some shops will come down $50 or maybe even $100 if you have cash in hand.
Apr
12
comment 1980's bike vs New(er) Models? (Should one stay with an ancient bike?)
The selection is better in the spring, but (at least in the US) the prices are MUCH better in the fall -- 30-50% lower in some cases.
Apr
12
comment How do I remove a bottom bracket?
Yeah, place you're fingernail in the groove of the cup and "unscrew" your hand. Whichever way "unscrews" vs going tighter is the direction you need to turn the cup. That appears to me to be a "normal" right-hand thread that will unscrew in a counter-clockwise direction, but it's hard to tell for sure in a picture. Definitely use a wrench with good square jaws, since if you muck up the shoulders of the "nut" it's a lot harder to get it loose. A well-equipped bike shop might have a flat wrench to fit.
Apr
12
comment How bad is this fire damaged alloy frame?
If there is going to be a problem with the frame it would most likely develop where the top tube joins the seat tube or the head tube. If you regularly inspect these areas for cracks for the first several hundred miles (avoid applying heavy paint to the areas) then you should be OK. (I think the folks on that other forum were overreacting a bit.)
Apr
12
comment How bad is this fire damaged alloy frame?
The headset bearings are almost certainly cooked and need to be removed and cleaned/relubed or replaced.
Apr
12
comment How bad is this fire damaged alloy frame?
Weird fire. Didn't touch the tires??
Apr
12
comment 1980's bike vs New(er) Models? (Should one stay with an ancient bike?)
There are only two reasons to abandon an old bike: 1) You can no longer (at a reasonable price) get replacement parts for it. 2) It no longer suits your needs. It sounds like #2 may be a problem for you. However, $500 is pretty tight for a budget if you're shopping in the US at this time of year (you can usually get some nice deals in the fall). You might want to look at Craig's List, et al, for a good used bike that suits your needs.
Apr
12
comment remove “wrench force” floor bike pump from the schrader valve
It sounds like you have a defective chuck. (One thing to note, however, is that some chucks lock by flipping up the lever, others lock by pressing it down. It may be that you're inflating with the chuck unlocked and then trying to pull it off locked.)
Apr
11
comment How bad is this fire damaged alloy frame?
I would suggest checking the headset bearings, as heat could have affected the lube there. And if that seat stem is carbon it could be suspect.
Apr
11
comment How bad is this fire damaged alloy frame?
Yeah, if the heat wasn't high enough to make the paint peel off then I doubt that the frame's integrity is affected. (It was an odd fire, though, to scorch the top tube like that and not cause any apparent damage to the seat, plastic bottle holder, rubber tires, etc.)
Apr
11
comment When to replace rear derailleurs
If you have trouble "tuning" then I'd suspect that components elsewhere are the problem -- worn cables, bent derailleur hanger, etc. And, of course, worn chain & cogs are a major reason for shifting problems
Apr
11
comment When to replace rear derailleurs
Yeah, the wheel bearings are supposed to be loose, and the pivots could easily last for decades without getting "sloppy", so physical damage is the only real factor in their life, beyond jockey wheel wear.
Apr
10
comment Frame that takes 700x35
In general you shouldn't expect to go much larger than the tires the bike shipped with. Most can tolerate another 5mm or so in width, but you can get into clearance problems much beyond that. (And note that there's a major difference between tire width and rim width.)
Apr
10
comment Steering in pivoting boom front wheel drive recumbent bike
Perhaps you could link to pictures of some examples.
Apr
10
comment Is there a polite way to take the centre of the road without antagonizing motorists?
In most (probably all) states in the US you're legally entitled to "claim" the lane if needed for safety. The basic rule is to ride as far to the right as safe and practical (leaving the cyclist to judge what that means), and Moz outlines why "claiming" the lane is often the best way to meet these criteria. Don't feel bad about the way you're doing it, just have a little consideration -- pull over to allow traffic to pass when it's reasonable, eg.
Apr
10
comment Tough road or touring frame/bike
When I used to repair donated bikes for Christmas Anonymous I ran into several bikes where the (cheap one-piece) bottom bracket bearings had completely rusted out from being left in the rain. But the frames were still sound, and we were able to "rescue" about half the bikes in this condition.
Apr
9
comment Tough road or touring frame/bike
Unless you live by the ocean, rust is a red herring. Very few bikes, even when left outside all the time, fail from rust to the frame. Other components (eg, bottom bracket bearings) will succumb to rust far sooner.
Apr
9
comment Tough road or touring frame/bike
The correct question is which material is easiest to reliably join, as (short of a MVA) the joints are the downfall of most frames. Aluminum, eg, is tricky to weld and subject to metal fatigue. Stainless likewise.
Apr
9
comment What is the convention for highlight colors on cue sheets?
I seriously doubt it.