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 Necromancer
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May
4
comment How did this happen to my chainring?
Improper assembly would simply mean that the bolts were not properly torqued (or perhaps the wrong bolts were used) the last time the ring was replaced. It's not really a rocket science operation, but anything can be screwed up, if you try hard enough.
May
4
comment Weird gyro effect while riding
Another point is the fore/aft extension of the stem. Moving the handlebar forward or back relative to the steering axis (due to a different stem) causes a significant change in handling characteristics.
May
4
comment shimano 105 brake/shifter won't move under tension
This usually suggests a corroded cable. Sometimes working lube into the cable housing will free it up.
May
4
comment How did this happen to my chainring?
I've never seen that before. Cranks come loose and fall off with appalling regularity (even though the symptoms of a loose crank should easily get the rider's attention). I would imagine that a loose ring, though, would be less noticeable until it got near the end, especially if you were on a different ring with different bolts at the time. (My guess would be that improper assembly is at fault.)
May
4
comment Weird gyro effect while riding
It's unclear what parts you replaced. If you replaced the entire fork you may have gotten one with a different amount of "rake" from the original, and that "rake" may be inappropriate for the head tube angle of the frame. If it was really just the stem (the part that holds the handlebar) that was replaced then it may be too small and may be wobbling in the tube of the fork.
May
4
comment How to minimize damage from pitted cones?
Good point about putting the damaged side up.
May
4
comment How to minimize damage from pitted cones?
One might be able to find a machine shop that could resurface the cone, but it would be expensive, and the resurfaced cone would wear faster.
May
4
comment How to minimize damage from pitted cones?
The problem is that running with such a cone will eventually cause similar damage to the cup of the hub.
May
4
comment Do pedal-driven bicycles exist that can handle highway commutes?
In theory one could build a flywheel-assisted unit that would let you "store up" energy by pedaling for several minutes before you began moving. At best you'd need to pedal about 5 minutes standing still for each minute of highway speeds you achieved. Beyond that there are are beginning to appear various solar powered cycles that can provide some assistance, but they would not permit sustained highway speeds.
May
3
comment Would rim brakes help a slightly bent rim?
It means something has "given" -- either the spokes have stretched or the rim has bent or some such. In general, you attempt to correct the problem by adjusting the spokes, though there's a limit to how well that can work.
May
3
comment Rear cassette 'ticking' forward, making chain catch, what is the problem and how do I solve it?
The ratchet mechanism in the rear hub is probably sticking. My understanding is that it's best to replace the "freehub" assembly than to try to rebuild it, though rebuilding is not impossible if you're so inclined.
May
3
comment Would rim brakes help a slightly bent rim?
No. But it's possible that the wheel realigned itself slightly as the stresses in the spokes equalized. Also, of course, the brakes will wear faster when the wheel is bent and so the gap between wheel and pad will grow.
May
3
awarded  Necromancer
May
3
comment Best kind of bicycle for lower back issues?
You might be advised to get your back checked out. Probably a doc first, and then a physical therapist, to learn some back stretches and exercises. As we get older our muscles get weaker (and lazier) and it takes more effort to keep them properly toned.
May
3
comment Tyre suddenly gets tilted
One should make sure the wheel is pulled all the way rearward before centering and tightening.
May
2
comment average cycling speed 12km/h
Yes, it's a bit tedious to do so, but not rocket science: Count the number of teeth on the largest front cog and the smallest rear cog. Either report those numbers here or plug them in to a gear ratio calculator.
May
2
comment How accurate is the 'calories burned' figure on my GPS device?
It might be correct within a factor of two, in not-too-extreme cases.
May
2
comment average cycling speed 12km/h
Well, you can time yourself for a KM or two, if there is a convenient stretch of road with KM markers. Or purchase an inexpensive cyclometer (though the quality of those has really gone downhill for the past 10 years or so).
May
2
comment bike keyhole broken
Well, you'll probably need to replace the chain, or at least a few links. And, unfortunately, having the pin break on a chain tool (especially a cheap one) is not unusual.
May
2
comment average cycling speed 12km/h
It is slow, but everyone moves at their own pace. Select your gear based on the effort required to maintain a decent cadence (70-80 is good). If you feel you can put out more effort (over the distance you're doing) then use a higher gear. (Your highest gear would be the largest front sprocket and the smallest rear sprocket.) If the highest gear is not satisfactory, you can probably get the rear cluster changed for one with smaller cogs.