32,816 reputation
13292
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location Minnesota, USA
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 8 hours ago

Old, tired, crazy.


Sep
30
comment Is it realistic to fuel a long ride with NO sugar?
I think you put too much faith in (overly simplified) math. While you touch on several of the significant points, the whole picture is much more complicated than that.
Sep
30
comment If a derailleur cable snaps on a long ride, how can I keep going?
I've never personally experienced it, but have encountered a couple of riders on rides who had their cables snap at the shifter. Apparently some newer shifters flex the cable ends pretty badly.
Sep
30
comment If a derailleur cable snaps on a long ride, how can I keep going?
Generally you'd just tie the derailer into position over an appropriate cog. (Breaking the chain sounds pretty extreme, and is apt to take you from frying pan to fire.)
Sep
29
comment Reoccurring Bent Axles, any reasons or upgrades?
@BPugh - Balls are cheap to replace, and any decent bike shop sells them. You just need to replace all at once, if the bearing has any sort of miles on it.
Sep
29
comment Is it realistic to fuel a long ride with NO sugar?
Pure glucose makes it into the blood within just a few minutes of eating. Other sugars take longer, but will probably have "kicked in" within 15 minutes or so. Complex carbs take on the order of an hour.
Sep
29
comment Is it realistic to fuel a long ride with NO sugar?
You don't indicate how hard you plan to ride, but a person in reasonable shape could easily ride 6 hours at a touring pace without eating anything at all. That said, it's probably a good idea to east something, and any sort of carbohydrate will probably do -- whatever tastes good and sits well on your stomach. You don't need protein, especially since it often comes with fat (which is a bad idea, usually).
Sep
29
comment Is it realistic to fuel a long ride with NO sugar?
@StephenTouset - There is a chemical distinction between sugars and more complex carbohydrates. Grains have relatively little sugar in them.
Sep
28
comment My Gears Are not Shifting Well
From your pictures, the drive train is quite dirty and lacks oil. (You should never see rust on a chain.) Clean and oil it (there's a good thread on how to do this somewhere) and you should be in much better shape.
Sep
28
comment Choosing a tool to take off the front cassette
@Mac - Quote: "You remove the bolt holding the crank on (using a standard "Allen" hex wrench)"
Sep
27
comment brand new fixie, different sized dropouts - send back?
Looks like defective merchandise to me. Unless the unit was sold as "irregular" the seller owes you your money back and he should pay shipping. (And you should give him a nasty evaluation on Ebay.)
Sep
27
comment Do skilled cyclists really “use the front brake alone probably 95% of the time”?
@trailmax - We're talking about the speed with which it happens -- faster than humans can respond. And I was speaking of two different videos, one of bike flipping over forwards, one of a tractor flipping over backwards, both eerily similar.
Sep
27
comment New Trek 1.5 wheels need to be trued after 2 rides, normal?
I would guess most shops leave the wheels on the bike and just spin them to check true. They'd only remove them if they looked bad in the spin check. And there's no way to tell whether a wheel has been sufficiently "pre-stressed" other than perhaps by knowing that some manufacturers do it better than others.
Sep
27
answered Choosing a tool to take off the front cassette
Sep
27
comment New Trek 1.5 wheels need to be trued after 2 rides, normal?
I don't think it's really a bike shop's job to pre-stress wheels on a factory bike. They don't "know" that the wheels are going to be out of true in 2 weeks because that's really unusual. To be slightly out of true after a month or two might be expected, but the amount should be hardly noticeable.
Sep
26
comment Are folding bikes less efficient than full sized bikes?
You omit geometry, which affects both rider comfort and bike stability, both of which are major factors in fatigue. This is where many folders (such as Citizens) fall way short.
Sep
26
comment Do skilled cyclists really “use the front brake alone probably 95% of the time”?
When riding in a peloton the rider behind you can usually see when you operate the rear brakes, but not so easily the front.
Sep
26
comment Do skilled cyclists really “use the front brake alone probably 95% of the time”?
@trailmax - If you watch the video I did it's clear that by the time you realize you're going to head-over it's too late. Same with tractors and a tow chain wrapped around the axle -- folks think they will feel the front wheels rise off the ground and release the clutch fast enough to stop it, but watching the video of that it happens in the blink of an eye.
Sep
26
comment Are folding bikes less efficient than full sized bikes?
Some folders are terrible, some quite good. Bike Friday bikes have been used for coast-to-coast rides across the US. Citizen bikes, OTOH, have been used to ride around the block.
Sep
25
comment protecting your man part while cycling
That's a slightly more extreme version of seats that have been around for decades. Terry probably produced the first.
Sep
24
comment In which orientation should a front wheel be installed?
@BrianKnoblauch - But what about the people who want a perfectly balanced bike and so put the two levers on opposite sides to balance out?