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comment Smartphone mounted on handlebar: Will vibrations during cycling damage it?
@grahamparks - So your "experience" is that you've somehow fastened a smartphone to a bike for a period of time and the phone has not (yet) failed?
9h
comment Preventing frozen brake cables
Any measure you take is temporary if you can't prevent water from getting into the cables. WD-40 is a good "water dispersant", or one could dribble full-strength auto antifreeze down the cable housing. But, as I said, either measure would be temporary. It should also be noted, though, that "frozen" cables may not be frozen, but rather the lubrication may have stiffened up (this is especially true of some shifters). In this case a lighter lubricant can be effective.
9h
comment Preventing frozen brake cables
MikeL makes a good point in that WD-40 is specifically designed as a water dispersant (that's what WD stands for). It would be effective at temporarily unfreezing a brake cable.
23h
comment Smartphone mounted on handlebar: Will vibrations during cycling damage it?
@grahamparks - You presumably have no idea what "g force" means. In college I spent most of a year in a small room testing vibration damping for the Air Force. Then I spent a number of years with a large computer company where the vibration sensitivity of disk drives and other gear was an issue. Plus, of course, basic physics. What is your background in the area?
1d
comment Safe to ride with Kenda 27 x 1/38 inch studded tires in snow/ice?
You need to verify that there is frame & brake clearance for studded tires. As to whether the studs are a good idea, they are (if properly installed) at least moderately effective on ice, but they do little to add traction in snow and slush. Do note that tire life will be significantly degraded.
1d
comment Slipping aluminium seatpost in aluminium frame
That's a little odd, given that aluminum/aluminum joints have a tendency to "seize" and hence are typically treated with some sort of anti-seize compound. But probably the simplest solution is a worm drive hose clamp on the seat post just above the existing clamp.
1d
comment Seat Stay Replacement - Bridgestone MB-3
Rather than replacing the stay outright, I'd be inclined to straighten it and then have your "welder" braze some sort of re-enforcement (rod or thin tube) to it. Otherwise find a legitimate frame builder -- he will know how to source the parts.
2d
comment Lubrication/Grease
What is this "cleaning" thing??
Feb
9
comment Bike won't shift at all
The "usual suspect" is the cables, especially given the way you describe it. Though as Criggie suggests it may be the shifters.
Feb
8
comment Smartphone mounted on handlebar: Will vibrations during cycling damage it?
Anyone who is skeptical of the above can pose it as a question in Physics SE.
Feb
8
comment What speed of wind gust will cause a cyclist to swerve by 1m or more?
It's quite unpredictable. Depends on the angle of the wind, the configuration of the bike (bags? rider upright or aero? handlebar style?), and how quickly the gust comes up (if the rider has any time at all to correct then there will be no significant deviation). The gust from a truck passing in a crosswind is worst, since the wind quickly changes directions twice.
Feb
7
comment rear wheel not spinning when the skewer is locked inn
My first guess would be that the brakes are rubbing.
Feb
6
comment Are folding handlebars a good idea from an engineering standpoint?
If one hinge pin fails the bar would still be restrained, to a degree, by the brake cable. Whether the failure would be recoverable depends on how quickly the cyclist can/does react. But the bar failing at the pivot would be more likely, and harder to recover from.
Feb
6
comment Are folding handlebars a good idea from an engineering standpoint?
Note that the two "castings" need to somehow clamp the ends of that center stub. It's not clear how that works.
Feb
6
comment Are folding handlebars a good idea from an engineering standpoint?
The center locking nut very much resembles an S&S connector of the sort often used to hold together touring bikes. These have been in use for probably 50 years and are highly respected.
Feb
5
comment Are folding handlebars a good idea from an engineering standpoint?
Another potential point of failure is where the handlebar is drilled through for the pivot bolts. This would put substantial stress on the bar tube and the tube could crack and fail at that point. But the design, with the threaded connector solidly binding together the two halves, should minimize stress at this point, of the materials are properly chosen and the manufacturing process is appropriate.
Feb
5
comment Are folding handlebars a good idea from an engineering standpoint?
I've seen worse ideas. The plastic hinge blocks would appear to be the weakest link -- they could disintegrate or the connection with the center part could suddenly twist. The threaded connection between the two halves of the handlebar should be about as good as a S+S frame connector for folding bikes, though. (That is, pretty good.) But of course one would need to use care when securing the nut.
Feb
5
comment Can you have too many in line barrel adjusters?
Each adjuster has a certain amount of "slop", and it would begin to add up. But three is probably OK -- I'd be concerned with 5 or 6.
Feb
5
comment Presta valve on new tube won't inflate
You should always slightly inflate a tube before inserting it into a tire. This helps assure that it doesn't get twisted or pinched during installation.
Feb
4
comment Crank arms are not parallel to each other. What could have caused this?
As Mike Baranczak says in his answer, one of the cotters is in backwards.