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7h
comment Grinding sound from rear wheel
@Batman - I agree that any time a hub is taken apart to the extent that the balls are removed and everything cleaned up, one might as well replace the balls. It's false economy not to. And the cones should be carefully checked for wear and replaced if any significant wear is seen.
7h
comment Grinding sound from rear wheel
Assuming this is a standard derailleur-style bike, the grinding noise, if not due to some external rubbing against the frame (which should be visible) would be due to the bearings going bad. If the bearings are of the loose ball/cone/cup variety then this can be cheaply repaired, if not too far gone. If the bearing are cartridges it's a bit more complicated, but still doable. However, if this has been going on for "the last few weeks" then there's a good chance that the hub is irreparably damaged.
12h
comment Front drum (was disc) brake only works when going backwards (!)
My guess is that someone "serviced" the brake and reassembled it incorrectly.
1d
comment Hybrid, touring, or road bike for new commuter?
Probably the hybrid is what you want. The touring or road bike would not be unfeasible, however, if you wanted the bike for other purposes as well.
1d
comment Pedal on exercise bike fell off, not going back on
Important: Did only the pedal come off, or did the crank arm come off as well? If the crank arm came off then you probably need to take it to a bike shop. If just the pedal came off then likely the threads are slightly fouled. Still better to take it to a bike shop, but first you can try taking an old toothbrush and using it to clean out any crud in the threaded hole in the crank arm. Then look in there and see if there are still any tiny globs of metal that would foul things up.
1d
comment Smartphone mounted on handlebar: Will vibrations during cycling damage it?
@grahamparks - So your "experience" is that you've somehow fastened a smartphone to a bike for a period of time and the phone has not (yet) failed?
1d
comment Preventing frozen brake cables
Any measure you take is temporary if you can't prevent water from getting into the cables. WD-40 is a good "water dispersant", or one could dribble full-strength auto antifreeze down the cable housing. But, as I said, either measure would be temporary. It should also be noted, though, that "frozen" cables may not be frozen, but rather the lubrication may have stiffened up (this is especially true of some shifters). In this case a lighter lubricant can be effective.
1d
comment Preventing frozen brake cables
MikeL makes a good point in that WD-40 is specifically designed as a water dispersant (that's what WD stands for). It would be effective at temporarily unfreezing a brake cable.
2d
comment Smartphone mounted on handlebar: Will vibrations during cycling damage it?
@grahamparks - You presumably have no idea what "g force" means. In college I spent most of a year in a small room testing vibration damping for the Air Force. Then I spent a number of years with a large computer company where the vibration sensitivity of disk drives and other gear was an issue. Plus, of course, basic physics. What is your background in the area?
2d
comment Safe to ride with Kenda 27 x 1/38 inch studded tires in snow/ice?
You need to verify that there is frame & brake clearance for studded tires. As to whether the studs are a good idea, they are (if properly installed) at least moderately effective on ice, but they do little to add traction in snow and slush. Do note that tire life will be significantly degraded.
2d
comment Slipping aluminium seatpost in aluminium frame
That's a little odd, given that aluminum/aluminum joints have a tendency to "seize" and hence are typically treated with some sort of anti-seize compound. But probably the simplest solution is a worm drive hose clamp on the seat post just above the existing clamp.
Feb
10
comment Seat Stay Replacement - Bridgestone MB-3
Rather than replacing the stay outright, I'd be inclined to straighten it and then have your "welder" braze some sort of re-enforcement (rod or thin tube) to it. Otherwise find a legitimate frame builder -- he will know how to source the parts.
Feb
10
comment Lubrication/Grease
What is this "cleaning" thing??
Feb
9
comment Bike won't shift at all
The "usual suspect" is the cables, especially given the way you describe it. Though as Criggie suggests it may be the shifters.
Feb
8
comment Smartphone mounted on handlebar: Will vibrations during cycling damage it?
Anyone who is skeptical of the above can pose it as a question in Physics SE.
Feb
8
comment What speed of wind gust will cause a cyclist to swerve by 1m or more?
It's quite unpredictable. Depends on the angle of the wind, the configuration of the bike (bags? rider upright or aero? handlebar style?), and how quickly the gust comes up (if the rider has any time at all to correct then there will be no significant deviation). The gust from a truck passing in a crosswind is worst, since the wind quickly changes directions twice.
Feb
7
comment rear wheel not spinning when the skewer is locked inn
My first guess would be that the brakes are rubbing.
Feb
6
comment Are folding handlebars a good idea from an engineering standpoint?
If one hinge pin fails the bar would still be restrained, to a degree, by the brake cable. Whether the failure would be recoverable depends on how quickly the cyclist can/does react. But the bar failing at the pivot would be more likely, and harder to recover from.
Feb
6
comment Are folding handlebars a good idea from an engineering standpoint?
Note that the two "castings" need to somehow clamp the ends of that center stub. It's not clear how that works.
Feb
6
comment Are folding handlebars a good idea from an engineering standpoint?
The center locking nut very much resembles an S&S connector of the sort often used to hold together touring bikes. These have been in use for probably 50 years and are highly respected.