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Jun
1
comment How do I stop my rear derailleur from rubbing against my chassis?
Definitely something is screwed up. Compare to this image where the chain is on about the same cog. It may or may not be mounted wrong, but it looks pretty likely that the chain is too long. The chain should just barely be long enough to fit the two largest cogs with the derailer fully stretched out.
Jun
1
comment Help identify this frame
Pretty darn generic. Lugged frame and downtube shifters place it prior to 1985 or so, I'm thinking. Cottered crank makes it earlier still -- 1975, perhaps. Large flange front hub (which was common for the era). Can't make out the brakes but probably generic calipers. Very likely 27" wheels.
May
31
comment Adding gears to a single speed Cycle
Cheap? Trade the bike in on a used multi-speed. Unless the bike is a "fixie" built on a multi-speed frame you'd need to use an expensive multi-speed hub, plus somehow replace the coaster brake with another style.
May
31
comment RevoShift Friction: shifting to the largest gear takes a lot of force?
Did you try lubricating the cable?
May
31
comment Can you take apart rear derailleurs, and how do you put them back together again?
I spell it "derailer" -- "derailleur" is an adjective.
May
31
comment My SPD shoes + cleats won't clip in to my SPD pedals
@Batman - You don't expect a $1000 suit to be fitted by a tailor?
May
31
comment My SPD shoes + cleats won't clip in to my SPD pedals
I suspect that it's the shoe and pedal not working together. If it's merely a bit of rubber on the sole interfering with the pedal it might be simplest to shave away the rubber.
May
30
comment Which rim tape for 700x28 tires?
You need to cover all the nipples with the tape. If there's a gap between nipples that's not a big deal. And the best choice for width is the widest that will just fit in the recess of the rim. You don't want any tape overlapping into the area where the tire bead will seat.
May
29
comment How do I fix stiff dual-pivot brakes?
What you did certainly did no harm. It is preferred to use a spray lube containing silicone or Teflon on such parts since those don't tend to gum up as much. But as @sessyargc.jp suggests you really need to lube the cables (with the same spray lube), and the cables may be due for replacement if they've been exposed to much weather. (Teflon lube is especially good with the sort of sliding parts you get in dual pivot brakes.)
May
28
comment Is the lack of activation in sore calves indicative of a poor stroke technique?
There are those who claim that proper cycling form includes "toeing" -- moving the ankle up and down with the pedal stroke so that the toe points down slightly at the bottom and up slightly at the top. Others claim this is poor form. (I can't offer an opinion since polio left me with weak ankles and I'm lucky they don't do "reverse toeing".)
May
28
comment gears slipping after a chain change
(According to what little I find on the bike the chain is a "10 speed".)
May
28
comment gears slipping after a chain change
Also, if your chain "snapped" that suggests that something in the drive train may be bent or damaged.
May
28
comment gears slipping after a chain change
My guess is that the new chain is the wrong size, or you did not properly adjust its length when installing.
May
28
comment Is there a cycling equivalent to Naismith's rule
Off-road there's also the question of how much bumping the rider will tolerate -- depends on the path, the bike suspension, and the ability of the rider to "levitate", in addition to his tolerance for abuse.
May
27
comment Is the lack of activation in sore calves indicative of a poor stroke technique?
Something's missing: Is this pain new, or has it been there for some time? If new, is it a result of some specific activity you engaged in recently? With regard to your stroke the two questions would be 1) Is your seat high enough? and 2) What is your "normal cacdence"?
May
27
comment Will speed/cadence sensor work with 650c bicycle
I've been using cyclometers for about 30 years, and I've never encountered one that wasn't adjustable in terms of wheel diameter. In fact, it's recommended that you measure your wheel circumference (by rolling the bike one full wheel rev on a flat surface) and input that, to account for minor differences in tire brands, etc.
May
27
comment Is there a cycling equivalent to Naismith's rule
Cycling on a smooth road it's practical to compute speed mathematically based on weight, slope, and power. Off-road would be all over the map.
May
27
comment When turning a corner my rear wheel touches the brake pad, is this normal?
Well, it's hard to judge how much "lateral force" you're applying, but certainly brakes could be adjusted close enough that this happens. If the bearings check out (zero "play" when you "rattle" the wheel back and forth) and you don't sense any drag then I wouldn't worry about it.
May
26
comment Insurance for carless cyclist in California
FWIW, this discussion is the first I can ever recall (here or in several other forums over the decades) regarding liability insurance for bicycles. I would guess that the number of cyclists who actually seek out such insurance is less than .01% of those cyclists who are not already "naturally" insured via auto insurance or home-owners/renters insurance.
May
26
comment if you replace the front gear system do you need to replace both the rear casette and the rear derailuer or neither
But, to the OP: If you have indexed shifters and want to replace them (for whatever reason), you can get away with replacing just the shifters if the old and new shifters are in compatible "families" -- that is, they "pull" the same direction (only matters for front), and they have the same amount of "pull" per click. But determining if this is true can be hard if the shifters are of different brands.