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Jul
27
comment Safe to shorten a dual-pivot caliper mounting nut?
As to the safety of doing this, I'd not cut away more than 1/3 of the thickness, and take care to not overheat the nut while grinding. It will get hot, of course, but don't grind for more than about 30 seconds at a time, with a minute or two cooling period in-between.
Jul
27
comment Replacing rubber connection in a bicycle trailer coupling
I think this is actually a fairly good suggestion. Most tires wear out long before the rubber begins to dry out and crack. Not sure of the best way to cut a tire with steel belts, but I'm thinking the sidewalls would not be steel, and should cut relatively easily.
Jul
27
comment Does price have a huge impact on the quality of road bikes?
Yeah, I should have mentioned the option of buying used. Or sometimes a friend or relative has a bike sitting in their garage that they'll let you have for free, or very cheap.
Jul
27
comment Replacing rubber connection in a bicycle trailer coupling
Yeah, a safety rope/chain/cable is a good idea. (I'd use a cable.)
Jul
27
comment Replacing rubber connection in a bicycle trailer coupling
Take the part out and take it to an auto parts place, or maybe a place that sells parts for tractors. See if they have something similar.
Jul
27
comment Does price have a huge impact on the quality of road bikes?
Beyond a certain point you're paying for grams of weight reduction. And the lighter, more-expensive bikes are less durable. But I would guess that the breakpoint (where you begin paying for weight reduction, not quality) is around 1000 euros, maybe a hair more.
Jul
26
comment Safe to shorten a dual-pivot caliper mounting nut?
Well, not with "no problem", if you don't know what you're doing. And you really need a vice (other than cycling, that is).
Jul
26
comment How should I configure my tail-lights?
Wars have been fought over this topic.
Jul
26
comment My rear bike wheel is wobbling back and forth when I ride
There is also the odd chance that the tire is simply mounted lop-sided on the rim.
Jul
26
comment Help identifying this frame?
I can right away notice a bunch of differences -- more different than similar, I'd say.
Jul
26
comment Help identifying this frame?
Ah! What appeared to be a second water bottle boss was simply the shadow of the first boss on the wall.
Jul
25
comment Help identifying this frame?
Can't clearly all the cable lugs, but they appear to be the simple style designed for sheathed cables -- usually associated with cheaper bikes, and after maybe 1980. One odd thing is that clamp on the seat tube. It sort of looks like a downtube shifter mount, but normally there would be some sort of "stop" on the downtube (other than the bottle boss) to keep the clamp from slipping, and I cannot see such a thing (but the pictures are poor quality).
Jul
25
comment Help identifying this frame?
OK, if we just have a random frame with no components, one can observe that it's lugged, so not likely to have been produced in the past 5-10 years when welding became the norm. And there are no lugs for downtube shifters, meaning it was either set up for stem shifters (prior to roughly 1985) or some sort of handlebar shifter (roughly after 1995). The water bottle bosses on the downtube are placed high, suggesting an older bike, before oversized water bottles became the vogue.
Jul
25
comment Help identifying this frame?
Unfortunately, with a track bike there are fewer age-identifying features.
Jul
25
comment Will slightly loose bearings result in damage?
It should be noted that a bearing seizing up tight like this usually results from the locknut on the right-hand cone not being tightened enough, resulting in the cone being screwed tighter and tighter. If the opposite cone is not tight enough the cone gets looser and looser, though the effect doesn't "snowball" as it does on the right.
Jul
25
comment 2 questions: What bike is this? Also is this front wheel too big?
Age-identifying features: Lugged frame, cotterless crank, stem shifters. The brakes are a distinctive style that could be easily identified by someone into that sort of stuff. The rear derailer appears quite short -- almost certainly only a 5-speed rear (though of course this can be checked).
Jul
25
comment 2 questions: What bike is this? Also is this front wheel too big?
I would guess it's a bike from the early 80s. If so it's designed for 27" wheels and tires. 700C wheels and tires would be a hair on the small side.
Jul
25
comment Will slightly loose bearings result in damage?
This depends on several factors, mainly the nature of the axle. A solid axle does not get any tighter as nuts are tightened. A quick-release axle, on the other hand, is compressed slightly when the skewer is tightened.
Jul
24
comment How should the brakes on a child's bike be adjusted?
Also keep in mind that with a new or recently "recycled" bike the brake blocks are apt to wear rapidly at first (and cables are apt to stretch a fair amount), so the tension should be a little tighter than minimum requirements.
Jul
24
comment How should the brakes on a child's bike be adjusted?
More important than the braking power (so long as it's in a reasonable range) is the grip range of the brake levers. The cable tension should be adjusted so that a child's hand can grasp the lever and begin squeezing before the lever gets stiff, but not so loose that the lever can bottom out in a child's grasp.