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Jan
31
comment I have an older Novara bike wth 26 x 1 1/4 x 1 3/4 tires. Any tires out there with a full whitewall?
@Batman - Which is one very good reason to ignore the inch sizing and go by the ISO.
Jan
30
comment Rear hub bearing replacement
Note that some hub designs have the dust cap as part of the hub rather than part of the cone. I don't know if you can readily buy replacement dust caps for such hubs.
Jan
30
comment I have an older Novara bike wth 26 x 1 1/4 x 1 3/4 tires. Any tires out there with a full whitewall?
Tire sizing systems
Jan
30
comment I have an older Novara bike wth 26 x 1 1/4 x 1 3/4 tires. Any tires out there with a full whitewall?
If I Google "26x1-3/4 whitewall" I get a fair number of hits. Some bogus, of course, but that's normal -- you can weed through them. The one thing that's unclear is whether this is for Schwinn-style S7 rims or something else. You should check the existing tires for the ISO size -- something like "44-571". The new tires must match the "571" (or whatever it is) value and be +/-5 or so on the "44" value. Vendors on the web should state the ISO size. (If they don't they probably don't know what they're doing.)
Jan
30
comment Bottom Bracket - Drive Side is Stuck, what to do please?
Longer lever/bigger hammer. If you're sure you're turning it the right direction.
Jan
30
comment Rear hub bearing replacement
Unclear what you're saying. The cone holds the bearings in place, the "cap" around it is just to keep dirt out. Replacement cones (with dust caps) are available for most popular designs. To install sealed bearings you'd need a new hub (and might as well buy the entire wheel).
Jan
30
comment Troubleshooting a bent mech hanger
It appears that the hanger's bent, though the derailer may be bent as well. Sometimes you can straighten things by just grasping and bending. If you have a spare skewer-type axle the thread on that is often the thread in the hanger where the derailer bolt fits, so you can use an old axle (with nuts) as a lever to "accurately" bend it back. Or you can use a small adjustable wrench.
Jan
30
comment Riding into a headwind faster than my top speed - how is it possible?
I'll admit that you've almost got me convinced.
Jan
30
comment Why is there a gap between my crank and bottom bracket?
Certainly for a traditional BB there's nothing wrong with that gap. Dunno about newer stuff, though.
Jan
30
comment Riding into a headwind faster than my top speed - how is it possible?
@JamesRyan - You are exerting force on the pedals. (Riding a 40mph conveyor belt is easy, since you only have to deal with rolling friction.)
Jan
30
comment Riding into a headwind faster than my top speed - how is it possible?
The power a cyclist produces is the torque on the crank times the cadence. I don't know about you, but when I'm riding into a headwind I gear down, so that a turn of the crank is not getting me nearly as far as in still air.
Jan
29
comment Riding into a headwind faster than my top speed - how is it possible?
You are wrong with regard to a basic detail. The energy expended in this case is power multiplied by time, not force multiplied by distance. The amount of power required to barely move forward in a 30 mph wind is only slightly less than the power required to go 30 mph in still air.
Jan
29
comment Where to get replacement bolt for rod brakes
That basic style of bolt is a more-or-less (mostly less) "standard" hardware item. Similar bolts are used, eg, to fasten fender stays. And, worst case, one could get a standard bolt and drill a hole in it.
Jan
29
comment Riding into a headwind faster than my top speed - how is it possible?
In general, above about 10mph your rolling resistance is negligible compared to air resistance, so if you can't do 30mph on the flat in still air you will have difficulty moving at all in a 30mph headwind, if it's really head-on. And sometimes a crosswind is even worse. The main reason you can even stay upright in such a wind is that you're willing to exert yourself that hard, whereas you're not when it comes to doing 30mph, at least not for long.
Jan
29
comment Are all vintage bikes difficult to work on?
Every bike (that survives at all) becomes "vintage" after a period of time, And the bike manufacturers have conspired to increase the rate of "vintagification" over the years, such that a bike can effectively enter that category in ten years or less if you are unlucky in your choice of componentry.
Jan
29
comment What is a good gents' hat to wear while cycling in formalwear?
Whatever you feel is appropriate for your funeral.
Jan
28
comment How do I wrap a road bike handlebar?
Use hockey tape. Standard bar tape works so poorly I've never figured out why anyone uses it.
Jan
28
comment Why is a steady cadence so important? Or is it?
(That said, a 6.5 mile ride is not any sort of "challenge" to anyone who's in halfway decent shape. You're welcome to ride that distance using any style that suits you.)
Jan
28
comment Why is a steady cadence so important? Or is it?
Certainly every rider (moreso as you get older) needs occasional "breaks", but these should involve getting off the bike, walking around a bit, having something to drink and maybe eat, and taking a pee. Simply coasting for the 30 seconds you might get away with it on flat ground with no tailwind is not a "break".
Jan
28
comment front wheel takes more impact than rear?
That's known as a "snake bite", often the result of running tire pressure too low. But definitely the front wheel takes more abuse than the rear.