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May
15
comment Can you remove the chain missing link too often?
Invest in a "chain washer". A lot faster/cleaner and virtually no chance of somehow compromising the chain.
May
15
comment Vandalized top tube
In Africa they'd bang it out straight, splice a piece of wood to the top tube (possibly with duct tape) and keep riding. But by American/European standards it's a goner -- too apt to fail at other points, even if the top tube is somehow "made whole" again.
May
15
comment Cyclocross Bike On the Road
You might look for tires that are relatively smooth down the center, but have a passable off-road tread on the sides. (I would assume that such tires are made.) And, if you can, adjust your tire pressure between the two conditions, raising it to near the sidewall max while on the road.
May
15
comment Bike not changing correctly between two gears
@gaoithe - The pantograph automatically compensates for chain stretch. Well before the pantograph runs out of range the chain should be replaced.
May
15
comment Direct Pull (V-Brake) vs. Center Pull Cantilevers (pros and cons)
@Aron - Right, the other factor in the equation is pad clearance. But most setups can tolerate a 2x difference in pad clearance. (And the V-brake is actually worse in this regard -- less clearance than your typical canti.)
May
15
comment Bike not changing correctly between two gears
@gaoithe - Adjusting the indexing screws on the rear derailer will do nothing to compensate for chain wear. Adjusting the BARREL ADJUSTER for the shift cable compensates for CABLE stretch, but does nothing for chain stretch either.
May
15
comment Direct Pull (V-Brake) vs. Center Pull Cantilevers (pros and cons)
"Power" vs "grabby" is a design trade-off based on the geometry of the levers involved. V-brakes are mostly designed to have more "leverage" and thus you get more force on the pads for a given brake lever force. This makes the brake "grabbier" and with less modulation. Simply changing the brake levers slightly (the distance between pivot and cable attachment) would change this -- has nothing to do with the overall scheme. (I suspect that Shimano chose to make the brakes "grabbier" to be more "impressive", even though they are often too "grabby" for good bike control.)
May
15
comment Direct Pull (V-Brake) vs. Center Pull Cantilevers (pros and cons)
@Aron - You never heard of a "lever" -- force multiplier?
May
15
comment What effect does seat tube angle have?
Mainly, seat tube angle affects the position of the seat relative to the crank -- in effect how "recumbent" your riding position is. Of course, sliding the seat forwards/backwards on the rails also affects this, but ideally the seat should be centered on the rails from the factory, allowing the seat rails to be used for "fine tuning".
May
14
comment My calf catches my derailleur when I pedal
I'm guessing that you are rather "splay footed" -- when you stand your toes are pointing outward to the sides. This cause your calf to come closer to the derailer than for a "normal" person. You can learn to not do this so much, or you can get "toe clips" or "clipless" pedals that limit how much your feet can twist, or you can get someone to change out parts of your crank for one that places the feet farther out (several options here, but not cheap).
May
14
comment Cord showing near bead
Something is rubbing against the tire. I had this happen with my front tire last summer when I replaced the wheel and readjusted the brakes (due to the change in rim width) and didn't get it right -- it looked OK on casual examination, but when the brakes were full on they were rubbing.
May
14
comment Bike not changing correctly between two gears
@gaoithe - And precisely how does adjusting the indexing screw "allow for chain wear"??
May
14
comment Direct Pull (V-Brake) vs. Center Pull Cantilevers (pros and cons)
@Aron - You must have missed the place in physics class where levers were explained. Arguments about perpendicular force, et al, are pure bull -- work = force x distance. Period.
May
14
comment Forearm pain during and after cycling
(Do note that persistent sharp or "electric" pain from within the muscles that lasts more than a few days is suggestive of muscle, tendon, or nerve injury, vs simple "muscle soreness", and it merits more concern. If the pain is relatively diffuse, however, then you probably are suffering from simple "overuse".)
May
14
comment Forearm pain during and after cycling
Very likely this is nothing more than underused muscles being stressed more than they're used to. The other possibilities that come to mind are carpal tunnel syndrome (though the symptoms don't quite fit) or an inherited "metabolic disorder" such as MADD. Obviously, adjusting your riding position to take strain off the forearms will likely help.
May
14
comment How to prevent spiders from making webs on my bike?
As to sprays, there is some slight chance that some sort of oil or soap solution would deter spiders, but it would also make a mess of the bike. Pesticides would be ineffective and dangerous.
May
14
comment How to prevent spiders from making webs on my bike?
Note that it's not the bike, it's where you're storing it. I've stored bikes in many different conditions and rarely had problems with spiders on them.
May
14
comment How can I stop my toes from going numb on long rides?
"Ankling" is sometimes called "toeing", and involves tilting the foot up and down (pivoting at the ankle) as you pedal. In theory you tilt your toes down as you press down, and tilt them up as you pull the foot up, so that the motion of the foot augments the pedal stroke. There are some folks that swear by this technique, and some that say that it's a bunch of hooey. (I have weak ankles from polio, so I've never been able to do it very well, and hence I have no experience to offer one way or the other.)
May
13
comment How can I stop my toes from going numb on long rides?
My guess is that you are pointing your toes down and pushing your feet into the shoes as you ride. The plate on the bottom of the shoe should be far enough back that you are riding on the ball of the foot and can comfortably ride with your foot fairly level. Also check the height of your seat -- too high or too low will contribute to improper foot orientation.
May
13
comment Difference between grease
There probably is a general machinery grease that is a better choice than automotive "disk brake" (high temperature) wheel bearing grease. But it would be hard to tell you which one.