31,910 reputation
13083
bio website
location Minnesota, USA
age
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 1 hour ago

Old, tired, crazy.


Jul
26
comment When do I need more than one bike? How many bike is enough? How many bikes is too many?
(One does need to consider practical matters such as garage space and (cough) money.)
Jul
26
comment When do I need more than one bike? How many bike is enough? How many bikes is too many?
(My bike is a touring bike, which is a decent road bike (I never race) and can handle relatively "tame" trails pretty well. Good for commuting, good for general "tooling around", good for touring. The only time I've ever considered another bike was when I was (briefly) getting into winter biking, and for that I would have wanted bike with studded tires and without fenders. Could have switched the tourer back and fourth, of course, but a second bike would have been much more practical.)
Jul
26
comment When do I need more than one bike? How many bike is enough? How many bikes is too many?
That's like asking if you can have too much money.
Jul
25
comment Please help me identify my bike
No need to replace the brake pads until they've been found to be bad. They will get harder with age, but if they were pretty soft to begin with that's not such a bad thing.
Jul
25
comment I want to weld or braze the pedal to the crank arm, but what metals are they?
Another option is to fill the hole with aluminum weld, then drill and re-tap. Again, for the left side you'd need a left-hand tap.
Jul
25
comment I want to weld or braze the pedal to the crank arm, but what metals are they?
The other option is to install a Helicoil in the arm. Easier if it's the right side, since left-hand Helicoils are probably hard to find (though bike shops may carry them). (I wouldn't expect epoxy to last more than a few days.)
Jul
25
comment What can be done to fix a hub that has come apart?
@Carel - When I was rehabbing bikes for Christmas Anonymous I saw hubs much worse than that turn out OK.
Jul
25
comment What can be done to fix a hub that has come apart?
The hub needs to be disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled, taking care to get the "cones" holding the balls in to the proper tightness (a little bit of an art, or a lot of trial-and-error), and taking care to get the thin lock nuts just outside the cones tight against the cones. The only "special" tool needed is a thin "cone wrench" of the proper size -- otherwise you just need a few open-end wrenches, solvent to clean things up, and fresh grease. (Though it doesn't hurt to replace the balls while you're at it -- they're cheap.)
Jul
25
comment Carrying Pizza on a Bicycle
Put it on the seat and sit on it? (I would think that a medium sized pizza could be carried on the rear rack, though you'd probably want to add some sort of platform.)
Jul
25
comment Please help me identify my bike
Yeah, the only thing that must be replaced is the tires (assuming no one has replaced them in the past 20 years). And you probably need to oil the chain and squirt some lube on the brake pivots and derailers.
Jul
24
comment Please help me identify my bike
It's old, likely with old-style, non-indexed shifting. Probably built in the 80s. Lightly used (the handlebar tape is clean). The tires will almost certainly need replacing, but otherwise it appears to be in good condition. The narrow tires (looks like 1-1/4 maybe) are not suited for off-road or cobbles. It's a relatively tall bike -- probably best for someone 6 feet or taller.
Jul
24
comment How to fix V-brakes
If the cable fixing bolt is tight and the "noodle" (curved metal tube) has it's end properly nestled in the notch of the floppy metal "U" shaped piece then the brake should work. If not then the cable is not properly adjusted or there is something loose somewhere else.
Jul
23
comment difficulty inflating my bike tire
On a Presta I always give the valve end a tap after unscrewing it, to make sure it releases a "pfft" of air. This loosens the rubber seal inside if it's stuck, and it makes sure you have the knobbie thing unscrewed far enough.
Jul
23
comment Can I replace my bicycle's dynamo with batteries?
As RoboKaren indicates, most dynamos are AC. The LED lamps may be designed such that they depend on having AC, or may just blindly rectify the "juice" such that they won't notice that it's DC. One tricky issue is whether they depend on having AC to perform voltage regulation (not unlikely given that a dynamo has such variable output). If they depend on AC to enable the regulator then they may well self-destruct when powered with DC.
Jul
23
comment Can I replace my bicycle's dynamo with batteries?
(BTW, rechargeable penlight batteries are a PITA. And keep in mind that they run about 1.2v each.)
Jul
23
comment Can I replace my bicycle's dynamo with batteries?
If the lamps were old-fashioned incandescent lamps it would be simpler -- you'd just need to match the battery voltage to the RMS output of the dyno. But with LEDs it's harder to say. Probably you could use batteries of approximately the same voltage, but it might not work, and it might set the whole bike (OK, only the lamp socket) afire.
Jul
23
comment 2,600km on an 8 speed bike?
@Blam - Actually I think he should purchase it legitimately. ;)
Jul
23
comment 2,600km on an 8 speed bike?
I'd say 200km a day is overly ambitious. 100km would be more realistic.
Jul
23
comment Annual technology gap of high end road bikes
@Blam - Just the fact that hobbyists have been making electric shifters for years.
Jul
22
comment Annual technology gap of high end road bikes
An electric shifting system is simpler and likely lighter than mechanical, and hobbyists have been building them for at least 5 years. The added cost is probably about $50 currently and would drop to negative once volumes get up there. There are very few reasons (other than Shimano blocking the way) why all bikes would not be electric shift in a few years.