32,806 reputation
13292
bio website
location Minnesota, USA
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 47 mins ago

Old, tired, crazy.


Sep
28
comment Choosing a tool to take off the front cassette
@Mac - Quote: "You remove the bolt holding the crank on (using a standard "Allen" hex wrench)"
Sep
27
comment brand new fixie, different sized dropouts - send back?
Looks like defective merchandise to me. Unless the unit was sold as "irregular" the seller owes you your money back and he should pay shipping. (And you should give him a nasty evaluation on Ebay.)
Sep
27
comment Do skilled cyclists really “use the front brake alone probably 95% of the time”?
@trailmax - We're talking about the speed with which it happens -- faster than humans can respond. And I was speaking of two different videos, one of bike flipping over forwards, one of a tractor flipping over backwards, both eerily similar.
Sep
27
comment New Trek 1.5 wheels need to be trued after 2 rides, normal?
I would guess most shops leave the wheels on the bike and just spin them to check true. They'd only remove them if they looked bad in the spin check. And there's no way to tell whether a wheel has been sufficiently "pre-stressed" other than perhaps by knowing that some manufacturers do it better than others.
Sep
27
comment New Trek 1.5 wheels need to be trued after 2 rides, normal?
I don't think it's really a bike shop's job to pre-stress wheels on a factory bike. They don't "know" that the wheels are going to be out of true in 2 weeks because that's really unusual. To be slightly out of true after a month or two might be expected, but the amount should be hardly noticeable.
Sep
26
comment Are folding bikes less efficient than full sized bikes?
You omit geometry, which affects both rider comfort and bike stability, both of which are major factors in fatigue. This is where many folders (such as Citizens) fall way short.
Sep
26
comment Do skilled cyclists really “use the front brake alone probably 95% of the time”?
When riding in a peloton the rider behind you can usually see when you operate the rear brakes, but not so easily the front.
Sep
26
comment Do skilled cyclists really “use the front brake alone probably 95% of the time”?
@trailmax - If you watch the video I did it's clear that by the time you realize you're going to head-over it's too late. Same with tractors and a tow chain wrapped around the axle -- folks think they will feel the front wheels rise off the ground and release the clutch fast enough to stop it, but watching the video of that it happens in the blink of an eye.
Sep
26
comment Are folding bikes less efficient than full sized bikes?
Some folders are terrible, some quite good. Bike Friday bikes have been used for coast-to-coast rides across the US. Citizen bikes, OTOH, have been used to ride around the block.
Sep
25
comment protecting your man part while cycling
That's a slightly more extreme version of seats that have been around for decades. Terry probably produced the first.
Sep
24
comment In which orientation should a front wheel be installed?
@BrianKnoblauch - But what about the people who want a perfectly balanced bike and so put the two levers on opposite sides to balance out?
Sep
24
comment BB Lockring won't completely tighten
The threads are stripped, either on the cone, the lockring, or both.
Sep
24
comment Front wheel bent
In fact, the "damage" may have occurred without anything hitting the bike, when a spoke, out of the blue, just "decided" to break.
Sep
24
comment Front wheel bent
I've straightened up worse, just by adjusting the spokes, and had a fairly good outcome. Or you can sometimes buy a complete new wheel for pretty cheap.
Sep
24
comment Why is it important to keep equal number of turns when building a wheel?
@Vorac - Note that the spokes may not all have been threaded for the exact same distance. This is especially true if the spokes come from two different batches.
Sep
23
comment Why is it important to keep equal number of turns when building a wheel?
You start out with the assumption that the rim is round and the spokes are all the same length, and you strive to get all the spokes to near the same tension based on those assumptions. But at some point in the truing process you must deal with reality and start adjusting the spokes individually (or in small sets).
Sep
23
comment Can I replace a QR spike with a normal solid axle?
@Kibbee - Well, on the rear of a fixie you shouldn't even use a regular nutted axle without a chain tug.
Sep
23
comment Can I replace a QR spike with a normal solid axle?
Decent quality QRs, properly set, will not come loose under anything even vaguely resembling "normal" circumstances.
Sep
23
comment Difference between road & mountain drivetrain
Of course the length of the arm is not the only determiner. The old Suntour triple pulley derailer had an arm no longer than a standard road one but a much larger tooth range. I kinda wish someone would bring that unit back -- better ground clearance among other things so you'd think the off-road guys would love it.
Sep
21
comment Is it normal for the chain to slip in an 'extreme' gear?
Cross-chaining small to small is almost worse on modern indexed drive trains since on both the front and rear the chain is being brought close to the adjacent cog. On a 10-speed rear the clearance is so tight that the chain can easily hook the ramps of the adjacent cog and try to "climb". It's not going to change gears, of course, but it can climb enough to chatter or slip a tooth. This is exacerbated because the chain is at its loosest. One could "tune" the setup to minimize this issue, but it would be at the expense of smooth operation in more reasonable situations.