7,657 reputation
42445
bio website kibbee.ca
location Ottawa, Canada
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 18 mins ago

I'm a .Net web developer.


Jan
2
comment Hydraulic Vs. Mechanical disc brakes
@mattnz That website, it hurts my eyes.
Jan
2
comment Is there a certain size tube for my tyres?
Also, there is often some overlap in tube sizes. Common sizes are 18-23c and 23-35c. You can use either one of those with a 23c tire, but the larger (23-25c) will probably be heavier, and will be streched less, which may give it a little more puncture protection. Although most of the puncture protection should come from the tire. I've also seen 700xanything tubes, but I don't really understand how that works with everything from 23-38. Of course larger and small sizes exist, but those ones seem to be the most common for bikes that aren't on a track.
Jan
2
comment What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
It would probably be quite difficult on a BMX as most (all?) BMXs aren't fixed gear. In artistic cycling, bikes are always fixed gear and this position allows you to control it pretty much like a unicycle.
Dec
30
revised What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
added 304 characters in body
Dec
30
answered What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
Dec
30
comment What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
You don't need a BMX to do that. This trick has probably been around since before BMXs existed. Any name is most likely something that's been created after the fact, and most people who did it first probably just called it riding a bike like a unicycle. Anyway, check out Quicksilver for an early example (1986). youtube.com/watch?v=uIwMGkqa6Sw
Dec
29
comment Recommended handlebar style for short daily commute?
I'd go for a bike with drops. You can always spend most of the time on the hoods or tops, which isn't much different from a flat bar. The drops are there for when you need them. Plus a nice drop bar offers many different hand positions, which can help to relieve fatigue. Even if you're only travelling 4 miles, changing hand positions can help. If you have some small injury on your hands (even not bike related injuries) having different positions you can place your hands can help make riding more comfortable. If you want a more upright position, try a touring bike over a racing bike.
Dec
27
revised Cheap alternatives to avoid tire punctures
added 749 characters in body
Dec
27
comment What to look for when buying bicycles for children
Trek makes a line of bikes for kids, but you'll pay for it. They cost $200 and up. That's 2-4 times the price of something you'd find at Walmart. Whether it's worth it or not probably depends on whether you have other kids you can pass it down to, likelyhood of resale, and your budget. For some people $200 is nothing. (trekbikes.com/us/en/collections/kids)
Dec
27
answered Cheap alternatives to avoid tire punctures
Dec
20
comment modernizing shifters
According to wikipedia, SIS stands for Shimano Indexed Shifting. It was (one of the) first successful indexed shifters. Quite old indeed (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shifter_%28bicycle_part%29#Index_shifting)
Dec
19
comment Any experience about radially-laced hub flanges actually breaking?
This site isn't sufficiently big such that you'll get more than a couple more anecdotal stories, which probably won't sway you more than the existing stories on the other forums which haven't seem to have swayed you yet. What is to be gained by using a radial spoke pattern? If it's really that important, there are hubs out there that are specifically designed to be laced radially. I'm guessing that the manufacturers have stress tested their hubs and recommend against it because there's a good chance it could break. Otherwise it would be another marketing point they could put on the packaging.
Dec
19
comment Any experience about radially-laced hub flanges actually breaking?
Just going to Google Image search and typing in "broken hub flange radial spokes" send me to this page (forums.roadbikereview.com/fixed-single-speed/…) if you scroll down to the bottom, You'll clearly see and image where this has happened. I'm not sure how common it is, but there's a reason that the manufacturer puts that warning on the hubs. I don't have my own story, but it's easy enough to do a Google search and find that there are enough stories out there that I wouldn't do it. What do you hope to achieve by doing this?
Dec
19
answered How do you lock your recumbent?
Dec
18
comment Buying from AliExpress
One thing to think about is the product warranty. If I buy something at my local bike store, I know they will help me out if I end up having to return it for warranty. I don't imagine the same could be said for stuff purchased from AliExpress. I wouldn't be surprised if some if it was counterfeit. I've bought a few lights and non-functional items (valve covers, etc) from dx.com, and I was happy with those items. But I've never had the faith in ordering something from China that was crucial to the safety and proper operation of my bike.
Dec
18
comment Bicycle for 2 x 30mins commute
A bit of trivia here, "Roubaix" refers to the Paris-Roubaix (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paris%E2%80%93Roubaix) bike race held from Paris To Roubaix. A large portion of the route is over cobblestones, and creates some "interesting" conditions.
Dec
17
comment Bicycle for 2 x 30mins commute
I would spend at least $400 on a bike i planned to use every day, assuming it was new. 10 km x 2 ways x 20 days a month x 6 months = 2400 km per year. After 4 years, that's close to 10,000 km. If you only spend $300 on a bike, don't expect it to last for half that, and you will end up buying the $300 bike two or three times over. Spend more and you will pay less over the life of the bike.
Dec
17
comment Installing a rigid fork on a commuter MTB
Assuming you find one with the same rake, I don't imagine the geometry would be any different between having a rigid fork, and having a suspension fork with the lock-out enabled.
Dec
17
comment Bicycle for 2 x 30mins commute
Also, +1 on the tourer, or hybrid, because most road bikes don't have the proper holes to attach a rear rack. If you're going to be commuting a rear rack is almost essential. Sure you can get away with a backpack or messenger bag, but having a rear rack will be greatly beneficial, especially if you don't want to change clothtes. Backpacks make your back quite sweaty. Also, road bikes often don't have room for fenders, which are also essential if you don't want to change clothes.
Dec
17
comment Bicycle for 2 x 30mins commute
I would call them puncture resistent, there is no puncture proof pneumatic tire. Also ensure the tires are properly inflated. I used to get many punctures on my "cheap" tires (not cheap once you consider the cost of repaing and replacing tubes), and a couple punctures a year on my good tires. I didn't get a puncture at all this year and the only difference is that I now have a good track pump, and top up the pressure 2-3 times a week. Maybe I just got lucky this year, but I didn't get a single flat, and I put a lot of kilometers on my bike this year.