7,782 reputation
42545
bio website kibbee.ca
location Ottawa, Canada
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 2 hours ago

I'm a .Net web developer.


Jan
5
comment Small non-folding bike
I think you wouldn't gain much by having a small, non folding bike. The Brompton has a wheel base (measured hub to hub) of 1045 mm. A Trek Distict S (chosen because its was easy to find the info) has a wheelbase of around 1044mm. This is almost exactly the same. Any bike is going to need some minimum wheelbase in order to make it easy to control, and not feel to cramped when riding. You'll save a few inches on either end due to smaller wheels, but you'll have to decide if its worth the trouble and price of a specialty bike.
Jan
4
comment Small non-folding bike
@DanielRHicks Yeah, the biggest problem that I see is the 35 inch standover height. The pivoting back wheel is just gimmicky and makes it hard to ride. They should do away with that completely. The price could be brought down if thye just put rim brakes on it. Plus, the direct drive makes it really slow. They have an internally geared hub version to allow you to go faster, but that kind of removes the "simple" aspect which was their original goal. If you want a simple bike, you'd be better off with a standard fixie/single speed.
Jan
4
answered Small non-folding bike
Jan
3
comment What are the differences between a mens and womens bike frame?
I think the wheels are always the same size because there's too many things that must change along with the wheels. When the wheel/rim size changes, the tire, tube, spokes, forks, stays and probably a couple other things I'm forgetting need to change along with them. You can get a lot of variation in frame size while leaving the wheels the same size. It only becomes a problem in very small bikes where you start to have the toe contact the front tire when turning. On the smaller bikes you'll sometimes see 650c wheels, but even those are uncommon, as its a tradeoff for less tire selection.
Jan
3
comment What would cause variable air resistance on a day with no wind?
I often find that days which are little wet, that I actually seem to be going faster. Not so wet that I'm riding through puddles, but just wet enough so all the pits are filled with water. My guess is that the water fills in the very small holes in the road, which makes even older roads feel like new asphalt.
Jan
3
comment How should I train for a century while still commuting by bike to work?
Do you have extra time where you can take the long way to or from work? This might help you get more consecutive miles on your bike.
Jan
2
comment What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
Giving you an upvote, seems like "pedalling death truck" is a common name for it. Another term used is "Blender". I've incorporated this into my answer.
Jan
2
revised What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
added 406 characters in body
Jan
2
comment Hydraulic Vs. Mechanical disc brakes
@mattnz That website, it hurts my eyes.
Jan
2
comment Is there a certain size tube for my tyres?
Also, there is often some overlap in tube sizes. Common sizes are 18-23c and 23-35c. You can use either one of those with a 23c tire, but the larger (23-25c) will probably be heavier, and will be streched less, which may give it a little more puncture protection. Although most of the puncture protection should come from the tire. I've also seen 700xanything tubes, but I don't really understand how that works with everything from 23-38. Of course larger and small sizes exist, but those ones seem to be the most common for bikes that aren't on a track.
Jan
2
comment What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
It would probably be quite difficult on a BMX as most (all?) BMXs aren't fixed gear. In artistic cycling, bikes are always fixed gear and this position allows you to control it pretty much like a unicycle.
Dec
30
revised What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
added 304 characters in body
Dec
30
answered What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
Dec
30
comment What is it called when you ride a bmx like a unicycle?
You don't need a BMX to do that. This trick has probably been around since before BMXs existed. Any name is most likely something that's been created after the fact, and most people who did it first probably just called it riding a bike like a unicycle. Anyway, check out Quicksilver for an early example (1986). youtube.com/watch?v=uIwMGkqa6Sw
Dec
29
comment Recommended handlebar style for short daily commute?
I'd go for a bike with drops. You can always spend most of the time on the hoods or tops, which isn't much different from a flat bar. The drops are there for when you need them. Plus a nice drop bar offers many different hand positions, which can help to relieve fatigue. Even if you're only travelling 4 miles, changing hand positions can help. If you have some small injury on your hands (even not bike related injuries) having different positions you can place your hands can help make riding more comfortable. If you want a more upright position, try a touring bike over a racing bike.
Dec
27
revised Cheap alternatives to avoid tire punctures
added 749 characters in body
Dec
27
comment What to look for when buying bicycles for children
Trek makes a line of bikes for kids, but you'll pay for it. They cost $200 and up. That's 2-4 times the price of something you'd find at Walmart. Whether it's worth it or not probably depends on whether you have other kids you can pass it down to, likelyhood of resale, and your budget. For some people $200 is nothing. (trekbikes.com/us/en/collections/kids)
Dec
27
answered Cheap alternatives to avoid tire punctures
Dec
20
comment modernizing shifters
According to wikipedia, SIS stands for Shimano Indexed Shifting. It was (one of the) first successful indexed shifters. Quite old indeed (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shifter_%28bicycle_part%29#Index_shifting)
Dec
19
comment Any experience about radially-laced hub flanges actually breaking?
This site isn't sufficiently big such that you'll get more than a couple more anecdotal stories, which probably won't sway you more than the existing stories on the other forums which haven't seem to have swayed you yet. What is to be gained by using a radial spoke pattern? If it's really that important, there are hubs out there that are specifically designed to be laced radially. I'm guessing that the manufacturers have stress tested their hubs and recommend against it because there's a good chance it could break. Otherwise it would be another marketing point they could put on the packaging.