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Jun
18
comment Trek 620 Front Fender
If you can't find something to work, there are options if you want to modify fernders
Jun
17
comment Finding a single speed kit for an old campagnolo from 1997 with screw on freehub
If you are going to end up replacing the free hub, it's probably easier to just replace back wheel with a proper single-speed/fixed hub and then you don't have to worry about using a conversion kit.
Jun
17
comment Is it worth buying a RFLKT+ or is the RFLKT good enough?
@CareyGregory I said I have an altimeter built into my GPS. Also, it's worth mentioning that barometric sensors aren't without their own problems. Since they rely on atmospheric pressure to calculate altitude, weather condtions such as storm can throw them off. A change in pressure of 5 mbar can result in a skewed reading of 40 meters. Even without storms, the pressure can easily change by 1 mbar, resulting in readings being off by 8 meters. They are great in showing change in altitude over a relatively short time, for individual climbs, but probably shouldn't be trusted as always correct.
Jun
17
reviewed Leave Open converting stem shifters to brifters
Jun
17
comment Is it worth buying a RFLKT+ or is the RFLKT good enough?
From what I read, you only need the ANT+ bridge if you intend to use it with an iPhone or other phone that doesn't support ANT+. If you have an Android phone that supports ANT+ (not all of them do), then you can use the ANT+ features of the phone directly, and you don't have to get the RFLKT+. The only advantage left over is the altimeter, which like you say, can be somewhat useful in climbing. I have an altimeter built into my GPS, and find it surprisingly accurate. The reading will go up or down by 1m increments as I lift or lower it in my hand. No idea with how accurate the RFLKT+ is.
Jun
16
reviewed Leave Open How can I assess my torque wrench?
Jun
16
comment Is a long, high angle stem safe to use with a carbon steerer?
I agree with @Super. Although 120mm is on the longer end of commonly available stems, the fact that it will make you much less hunched over the bars means that you'll probably have less force on the steerer than you would in the original configuration. Also, the "normal force" would probably be about the same because of the large angle.
Jun
14
answered What gears should I go for?
Jun
13
comment How to carry Xtracycle by car?
Where there's a will, there's a way
Jun
12
awarded  Custodian
Jun
12
reviewed No Action Needed Should I switch to a smaller chain ring?
Jun
11
comment Is any major manufacturer working on a 12 speed group?
I think the range is the main point. Road bikes currently have almost all the range they need with 11 speeds and a double crank. They also have the gears spaced quite closely together. Mountain bikes are a different story, as they often need a much larger range than road bikes. In this case, there could be a real advantage from more gears allowing smaller spacing between the gears, making them more similar to road bikes.
Jun
11
comment bicycle pedal design specifications for threads
@Blam Read the part in the link about "precession". The purpose of the reverse threading is to prevent the pedal from coming loose. This was an actual problem people had way back before they started using reverse threads. The pedal bearings would have to be beyond messed up for the bearings to lock up enough to cause it to unscrew. I don't think I've ever seen bearings that bad. Most pedals would have been replaced well before then.
Jun
11
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
10
comment Validity of UCI motor concerns
You can still go pretty fast even if you keep the cadence below 90 RPM, provided you are in the correct gear. This could be very useful when doing things such as climbing. It probably wouldn't help much in the final sprint where they are spinning in the top gear at high cadences. Also, the Vivax assist is probably optimized for 90 RPM and below, because that's how people will use it, but they could probably also design one that would work at 100 or 120 RPM if that was the design goal.
Jun
10
comment Validity of UCI motor concerns
I think for "mechanical doping", they'd be looking for devices such as the Vivax Assist. Which can be concealed in the seat tube, rather than quite visible hub motors. Most e-Bike motors are purposely limited to lower speeds to increase safety, but I'm sure a motor could be designed that would help a professional rider if that was the goal.
Jun
10
comment bicycle pedal design specifications for threads
@Batman I think you're right. Now that I think of it, even the lower end bikes that I've seen recently seem to have 9/16" inch pedal threads. Perhaps I'll check the pedals on my kids' bikes and get back to you on that. I was kind of just going from the information on Sheldon's site, which can (understandably) be a little dated in some areas. Also, Sheldon mentioned the now defunct "Dyna Drive" system which used must larger thread I think if you're designing a pedal or crank arm, you would pretty much cover the entire market by just going with 9/16".
Jun
10
answered bicycle pedal design specifications for threads
Jun
10
awarded  Custodian