7,912 reputation
42545
bio website kibbee.ca
location Ottawa, Canada
age 34
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 4 hours ago

I'm a .Net web developer.


Apr
8
comment Sizing guide for road bikes vs mountain bikes
This is probably based on the old frame design where the top tube was completely horizontal. Compare the placement of the old Eddy Merckx bike with the newer Trek Madone. Compare the difference in the top tube height by looking at the height of the top tube above the rear wheel.
Apr
7
comment Why are 3 inches mountain bike handlebar hard to find?
Almost forgot to account for the fact that road bikes don't have shocks, which would add to the torque on the bars. Almost all mountain bikes have at least front suspension which would somewhat reduce the amount of force on the bars.
Apr
7
comment Are there electronic/active theft deterrents for bicycles?
Yeah, I was thinking it would be something that you could use as a bike alarm with a little modification. It would be pretty easy to make a water resistant casing for it, that you could affix to the bike.
Apr
7
comment Are there electronic/active theft deterrents for bicycles?
I was looking at this laptop alarm the other day that looked like it could be adapted as an alarm for your bike. The alarm sounds from movement or from severing the cable. I'd probably use it in conjunction with a proper u-lock though.
Apr
6
comment Is there such a thing as a cyclist philosophy?
The velominati rules are a good read if you're looking for a laugh. Some a definitely rooted in good practices, but others are just there for fun.
Apr
6
comment Which pulley is which on my Shimano STX RC derailleur?
I found this derailleur overhaul after some Googling, and it seems to confirm that the G-pulley goes on top. I'm guessing that G stands for guide.
Apr
5
comment Straight or Drop handlebars?
As long as you stick to the hoods and drops, and leave the tops for things like climbing hills, you should always be in a good position to use your brakes. Although there is less braking power from the hoods, you should still be able to stop relatively quickly if your brakes are set up properly.
Apr
5
comment Why are 3 inches mountain bike handlebar hard to find?
Might be more of an issue on mountain bikes, but I can't see this being any different then riding on the hoods for a road bike. And there are plenty of situations where road bikes are going over plenty of bumps. Not only that, but on road bikes, the torque is applied perpendicular to the center of rotation, whereas on a mountain bike, the force would more likely be pointing towards the center of rotation (or at least less perpendicular than on a road bike).
Apr
4
comment Why are 3 inches mountain bike handlebar hard to find?
Why not opt for a different stem with a different angle which will effectively change the "rise" on the bar to where you want it to be.
Apr
4
comment I live in a place where it frequently floods. How can I keep my chain from rusting?
It's not really "disassembling", especially if you have a fixed gear/ single speed. Sure you can't just get on it and ride, but it's not that big of a deal, and if it saves you buying a new chain every three months, it's probably worth it. With a quick link, you could probably just remove the chain completely, although I'm not sure how well they stand up to repeated opening and closing.
Apr
2
comment Ride with someone who is less trained
And even if Barbie says it's OK to leave her alone, it isn't. In the words of Admiral Ackbar "It's a Trap!".
Apr
2
comment Is a bike faster than a car for the first ten metres?
In a race, I'm sure the car would outdo the bike, but cars don't usually (and shouldn't) race out of the intersection. Also, being in the right gear is very important for how quickly the bike accelerates. I generally accelerate quite slowly out of the intersection on my fixie, as the gear isn't optimized for starting out. Also, even if you're in the correct gear, in a commuting situation, there's a lot of cyclists who just don't want to reach a high speed, and their speed coming out of the intersection is quite slow because they only exert a minimal amount of force.
Mar
28
comment Packaging a bike for flying with a bike bag
You could also use a piece of wooden dowel cut to the right length and drilled through the center in place of the hubs/helmet between the forks. If you drill out the center of the dowel, you can use the skewers to hold it them in place. This will prevent your forks/stays from getting crushed.
Mar
28
comment Packaging a bike for flying with a bike bag
I've never had it done, but judging from these do it yourself instructions it seems that all that is necessary is to remove the pedals and loose the stem at the steer so that the bars can turned but the front wheel remains straight. Doesn't seem like there would be much reassembly involved.
Mar
28
comment Packaging a bike for flying with a bike bag
If you're OK with throwing out the box, or perhaps donating it to a local bike shop in Fukuoka you could use a box. Then pick up a new box in Tokyo for the ride home. It costs under $50 to have a bike boxed for travel in Canada and that includes the box, I have no idea if the price would be similar or if the service is even offered in Tokyo, but I can't see why not. Not too much of a price to pay to protect your ride.
Mar
27
comment How to keep my manbag in place
You could probably use a carabiner and hook one side of the strap to your rear belt loop.
Mar
26
comment How to protect myself when falling off the bicycle
Actually, the last thing you should worry about protecting is your limbs. Head is obviously the first, but before the limbs, there's a lot of other things you should protect. I think the order goes head, neck, spine, torso, then limbs. While you may think that a broken arm hurts, it's way better than getting a broken rib, or even worse, a broken neck. It's usually not a huge problem to fix a broken arm, even though it may put a dent in your cycling season. Also, I've known people would rode with broken arms.
Mar
25
comment Why ride a single-speed bike?
Nobody says you have to not have breaks to go fixie. I my fixie I have both a front and a rear brake. The advantage of a fixed is that it forces your feet/legs to move in proper cadence and not change it up too much. I have the brakes for exactly the reason you mention. With a decent gear on the bike, it's almost impossible to actually skid the rear tire, and it takes quite a distance to stop just using the drive train.
Mar
22
comment How much to eat and drink during a 50km ride?
You know that cycling advocacy is making some headway when they can shut down the DVP for a charity ride.
Mar
20
comment Protecting beater bicycle from scratches and rust
It's often not worth getting a beater bike professionally painted as the paint job costs more than buying another used bike. Even with harsh conditions, the bike would probably last 3-5 years without the paintjob, and a new paintjob would probably get quite a few scratches before the end of the first year anyway.