8,764 reputation
42850
bio website kibbee.ca
location Ottawa, Canada
age 34
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen 1 hour ago

I'm a .Net web developer.


Oct
20
comment Seatpost Overextension
What materials (carbon, aluminum, or steel) are the seat post and frame made from?
Oct
17
comment I need help planning my bike renovation!
If you're planning on using new parts, and replace the wheels, tires, bars, and seat, which is probably about the minimum you could get away with while making it look somewhat similar to the result bike, you would have spent at least $200. If you want to replace the crankset, pedals, and forks, you are probably getting close to what it would just cost to buy the bike new. I don't have much experience with swapping forks, but if you put a straight blade fork in, the bike geometry would change quite a bit as the rest of the frame wasn't designed for it and the tire might rub on the downtube.
Oct
15
comment How To Get Started With Hand Cycling
There are people with a single leg (due to amputation) that use regular bikes. It might be hard to resist the urge to push with the damaged leg, but with some practice it might not be too bad. Talk to your doctor/physiotherapist about it. It would definitely be cheaper than getting a handcycle, and even with the only the power of a single leg, you'd be able to go faster.
Oct
15
comment Non Removable Presta Extension
@DanielRHicks Yeah, I think that some bike shops don't like to stock 50 different combinations of valve lengths, tube material (latex vs butyl), width, and circumference, so it's easier just buy the longer lengths, which will theoretically work for all rim depths. In reality, the longer valves have a tendency to break when used with normal depth rims combined with hoseless frame pumps.
Oct
11
comment Is it possible to change a Shimano FC131 crankset's chainrings?
By "clear a 48t ring" he means that it's likely the larger chainring will not fit as the chainstays will interfere with it. It's possible that it may fit as 48 tooth isn't huge but it's something you have to be aware of. Also, you'll need a new chain as it will need to be longer,and you'll have to check if you rear derailleur has the capacity for the extra chain slack.
Oct
9
comment Do good tires lessen the chances of your innertube bursting?
fwiw, I don't think you need to go all out and get Gatorskins or Marathon Plus. Sure, they'll protect against punctures, but they are also heavy and provide a harsh ride. I was due for new tires and decided to splurge on Continental GP4000S II, and I haven't had any punctures in the 2 months I've had them. They provide good protection while still being light and giving a good ride. I think that most high quality tires that aren't made super thin for racing will give decent puncture protection. The cheap ones and the stock ones from BSOs are the ones to watch out for.
Oct
9
comment How much should the front wheel flex
You should check to see if the rim flex is also resulting in causing your brake pads to rub.
Oct
8
comment I want to start riding a road Bike. Is it a big difference if I buy a generic one?
A quick google for Gravity Liberty 1 leads to some interesting information. The Gravity Labelled "Sora" only has a Sora derailleur. The shifters, which are generally the most expensive part of the groupset are "Microshift" brand, not Shimano. Also, the Sora equipment they are using is 8 speed, which is not from the current model year. The current Sora is 9 speed. In short it's important to look at and compare every component so you know exactly what you are getting. Just having the word Sora doesn't mean the entire groupset is Sora.
Oct
1
comment Reversing Drop Bars
Those look like special bars. I don't think I've ever seen a drop bar that curves back in like that at the bottom (which is on the top in this setup).
Oct
1
comment The best way to deal with/prevent punctures on tubular tyres
I've tried products like that and I'm pretty sure they can only be used on clichers. Not tubulars as the question is referring to.
Sep
30
comment Does it matter where you buy the bike?
@GaryE What constitutes a "fitting" can also vary from store to store. Some will get you to sit on the bike and ride around, look at how your body fits the bike, and, move the seat up and down a bit and call it a day. Others will use computers and lasers to make sure everything is adjusted down to the millimeter. Swapping out stems and other parts to ensure everything is just so. Also, some places may offer different services for differnt bikes. Full fitting if you buy Di2 or Ultegra, but not if you're buying something with Acera components.
Sep
29
comment If a derailleur cable snaps on a long ride, how can I keep going?
You may be able to adjust the low limit screw far enough that you can get it to stay in the second or third gear.
Sep
23
comment Tips for having partner drive support.
@Batman On any such highway where cyclists would want to travel, it would probable be fine for a car to also travel at cycling speeds, provided it was easily visible to other motorists and either had it's hazard lights on, or a slow moving vehicle emblem
Sep
23
comment Tips for having partner drive support.
Good answer, however in the case where there is only a single driver and a few riders, I think it might be better for the car to always be ahead of the riders. If the car breaks down (or gets in an accident), the riders will eventually catch up and they can figure out how to continue. If the car departed after the riders, and then broke down before it caught them, it might be some time before the riders realized this. They would then have to turn around and ride back to meet the car.
Sep
22
comment Is there a way to merge tracks within a GPX file?
You can get custom maps for Garmin devices from the OpenStreetMap data by going to this site. You can select a predefined area (states or provinces in US/CA, or entire countries elsewhere) or select individual sections if you just want to get your city and surrounding area.
Sep
19
comment Hill riding: What gears are usually the most comfortable?
Don't forget that moving to a larger cog in the back will increase the difference in the number of teeth between adjacent cogs. This will make it harder to find a gear which gives you ideal cadence when you aren't in the easiest gear, which will be most of the time I would think. Ideally, you would have only a single tooth difference between each gear on the cassette so that you could always find the optimal cadence. But then you likely wouldn't have enough range and the hills would be too hard or you would spin out on the flats or downhills.
Sep
15
comment youth racing. 11 speed 16 up cassette
Reading up junior gearing it seems that the ratio is limited. couldn't you use a conventional cassette and just use a smaller chainring to limit the gearing
Sep
9
comment Got two bikes, one of them is more exhausting to ride, what can it be?
Is there any difference in tire tread between the two bikes? Are the tires properly inflated on both? Is there a significant difference in weight between the bikes? 3x6 gears sounds like a pretty low end bike. How old is it, and what brand is it? Is the slow one from Walmart? Did you check to make sure the brakes aren't rubbing?
Sep
9
comment Will bending the seat post two inches forward cause any unforeseen structural issues?
You may have more luck getting a lay-back seatpost and installing it the wrong way around.
Sep
8
comment How To Choose A Proper Sprocket Combination For A Road Bike Cassette?
I've been thinking lately that with 11 speed cassettes, that it would make sense to have a cassette that's 11-21 (or 11-23), and then have a triple crankset with something like 52-39-30. You would have very fine selection of gears, while having a very wide range of gears. I kind of think that doubles and compacts are optimized for the pros, where they will be changing cassettes and chainrings based on the conditions, but aren't great for the recreational rider who is always going to be using the same equipment. I think the added weight can easily be offset by the increase in efficiency.