6,767 reputation
42142
bio website kibbee.ca
location Ottawa, Canada
age 33
visits member for 3 years, 7 months
seen 10 hours ago

I'm a .Net web developer.


Oct
21
comment Why does reducing bike weight have such an impact on speeds?
I agree with @DanielRHicks. The amount of work required to get your wheels spinning is negligible. For a demonstration, lift your bike off the ground (or put it on the work stand, or using a trainer, removing the resistance), and see how easy it is to get your wheel spinning really fast. A minimal amount of effort with your arms will get your wheels moving quite quickly. Any additional force required when your bike is on the ground is what's necessary to get forward motion of the bike and the rider.
Oct
18
comment Why does the rear hub (cassette) moves on the axle when I pedal?
From what I can tell, the Burner SuperCycle is a 21 speed (7 sprocket) bike from Canadian Tire, and therefore most likely uses a freewheel. Also, in this case, bent axle isn't unlikely.
Oct
18
comment Must a Bicyclist Riding on a Sidewalk Stop at a Stop Sign?
If you were going for a jog, would you just jog through the intersection? or would you slow down a bit to make sure that there wasn't any cars coming? I guess it depends on the corner, and how far up the intersection road you can see. If you can see far enough up the road to ensure that there won't be any cars, it's probably OK to continue straight on through (assuming it's legal to begin with), but if you can't see the car coming, don't assume they'll stop for the stop sign either.
Oct
18
comment Nice Work Shoes That Won't Get Messed up in Toe-Clips
I have these pedals. They are great if you have one bike, and don't want to ride clipped all the time. I ride clipped when commuting or for exercise, but when I just want to go to the store, I can ride with regular shoes.
Oct
17
comment Nice Work Shoes That Won't Get Messed up in Toe-Clips
Personally, I just keep a separate pair of shoes at the office, as office shoes aren't really optimized for cycling, and my shoes always end up wet when it rains.
Oct
15
comment Why no threaded headset cups?
@Moz Something like that probably works quite well. Parktool makes a headset press that's remarkably similar to what one could make at home (see reviews), but sells for $70. Their high end press is $140, not $300, and similar tools from others can be bought for $70. Which doesn't answer why they aren't threaded, but does give options for installing them that won't break the bank.
Oct
15
comment How can I transport a Madsen bike?
According to wikipedia, a Suburban is 79 inches wide, which is 9 inches less than the bike. If you could perfectly center the bike on the rear rack, it would only stick out 4.5 inches on either side, which is no more than the mirrors. Also, you could remove the wheels for some extra clearance, and they would fit easily in the back of the truck. The only concern is for me is whether the bike can be easily centered on a hitch rack. It would be much easier than climbing on top of the truck to get it on a roof rack.
Oct
15
comment Definitive reference for tire widths?
If the contact was on the chainstay, it should have been contacting both chainstays evenly, unless your wheel was warped, or not seated properly. Are you sure this wasn't the case? On a touring bike that can accomodate fenders, it seems odd that 3 mm (1.5 mm radially) would cause such a problem.
Oct
11
comment Why no threaded headset cups?
There used to be threaded headsets. However I think they have fallen out of fashion. Perhaps they had a tendency to become loose, which would be catastrophic, as you would no longer be able to steer, or your front fork could disengage. Compared to your bottom bracket cups coming lose, which would just cause problems with providing power to the bike (cranks would still be connected to the bottom bracket). Also properly designed (not Italian), they are self tightening, and won't ever come loose, for the most part.
Oct
10
comment Plastic screw with ripped-off head stuck in the frame
Since they're plastic, if you drill a small hole in the middle as @DanielRHicks suggested, and then wedge something in the hole (needle nose pliers?) you could probably get enough grip to unscrew the plastic bolt. Or if you want to melt stuff, heat up the tip of a screwdriver, to make a new head on what's left of the screw.
Oct
7
comment How can I merge two GPX files into one?
Yeah, if you use Notepad++, you can get a lot of help from the XML Tools Plugin. Many GPS units won't save the files nicely formatted with line breaks and indented lines, but a couple clicks using the XML Tools plug in can fix this up really easily.
Oct
6
comment How easy are Parabolic v. Standard Rollers to use?
I have the CycleOps Fluid2, which has no variable resistence. However, I've found that using my bike's gearing offers more than enough of a range to get a good work out. That being said, it would not be a good choice if you have a track/single-speed bike. I also second the recommendation of a fan. I have my trainer set up in my unheated garage for the winter, so I don't need one, but an hour long ride in my frigid garage can make me work up quite a sweat. It would most likely be unbearable in a room that's heated to normal temperatures.
Oct
4
comment Are road cranks less strudy than comparatevely priced MTB cranks?
There might be issues with compatibility. If you look at things like Hollowtech, road cranks are usually made for 68mm, while mountain bike are often 73 mm. This doesn't matter for square taper and octolink, because this is all handled by the bottom bracket, but with hollowtech, the drive has part of the axle built into the drive side crank, so road cranks may not work with your mountain bike. Also, there might be issues if you are using road chainrings as well, as they are larger and might interfere with the chainstays, which is usually splayed out further to accommodate larger tires.
Oct
4
comment Treacherous ride - top half of fork points backwards, but the bottom points forward
Yes, it does appear to be bent. Looking at this image you can see that the fork looks put together properly with the concave part of crown facing towards the front of the bike. Which is exactly how this one is assembled.
Oct
3
comment (Automatic Bike Project) amount of torque required to change gears?
You can use pulleys or some other mechanical mechanisms to decrease the amount of force needed to change gears. Think of it like this. If you're controller is operating a standard down tube shifter, it has to provide less force if it's pushing against the top end of the shifter, than if you're pushing against the bottom end of the shifter close to the axis of rotation. The smaller force will be applied over a longer distance, so the same amount of work will be done, but requiring less force.
Oct
3
comment How long should pedals last?
Buy better pedals. Even as little as $30 can make a difference. They will cost more up-front but will last 5-10 times as long. Also, they will be more efficient, and make your ride (slightly) easier.
Oct
1
comment Considering a Trek FX 7.7 - What else should I look at that is similar
Have you considered moving away from a Hybrid. My first "Adult" bike was a hybrid, but after I wore through that, my next bike was a touring bike. I really liked having drops more than flat bars, and found that a touring bike was great for getting around the city. Trek makes the 520, which is a really nice touring bike.
Sep
28
comment How to get a replacement crankset gear for Dahon P8?
This crib sheet can be used to find the Bolt Circle Diameter, by measuring the distance between the center of the bolt holes.
Sep
24
comment Is it harmful to store a bike in a repair stand when held by the seatpost?
I would think that this would put an odd torque on the point where the seatpost meets the frame. With a road bike, it's probably not enough to worry about, but a mountain bike with a heavy front end might have more stress than you would constantly want on a seatpost. When riding, most of the force going along the length of the seatpost. When in the repair stand, the bike (which doesn't have a center of mass at the seatpost) will try torque the front end towards the ground. Try holding your bike up using just your hands on the seatpost to get a sense of how much torque is generated.
Sep
24
comment Will this Retrospec Siddhartha bike suit my needs?
@ChrisW As per this article, bikes must have both a front and back brake to be legal in the UK. The only exception for not having 2 brakes is on children's bikes, or on pennyfarthings and such where the axle is directly connected to the crank arms, without any gearing.