498 reputation
317
bio website
location Redmond, WA
age 23
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen Mar 13 at 21:38

I'm a Microsoft Software Development Engineer on the Trustworthy Computing Team. I've worked at several security related places previously, including Malware Bytes and PreEmptive Solutions.

On StackOverflow I mostly answer related questions, though I occasionally forray into and a couple of others.

I am the author of pevFind, a component of the ComboFix malware removal tool, and volunteer at BleepingComputer.com as a malware response instructor. My Twitter account is @MalwareMinigun.


Nov
13
comment Why has indexed shifting displaced traditional friction shifting?
@freiheit: Interesting. I don't really have a problem with indexing on the back -- on the front though the system gets out of alignment seemingly every 10 minutes.
Nov
13
comment Why has indexed shifting displaced traditional friction shifting?
Could you not combine the two? (Though honestly, any indexed system I've ever used still has just as much of the overshift problem as my 30 year old "bridgestone" bike -- one has to push the lever past the shift point until the chain moves, then the never returns to the stop point and does the "centering".
Oct
8
comment Why ride a fixed-gear bike?
@heltonbiker: 1. My last bike was 30 years old and had not worn out it's cassette or chainrings. (It did go though several sets of bearings though) In any case, I see no reason why the metal on cassettes or chainrings would be any thinner than that on a fixed gear bike. (Frankly, if you're riding enough that it becomes a problem, you're riding enough that the investment is probably worth it) 2. Did I say anything about staying in one gear? All I'm saying is that if there's clicking or rubbing going on, or it takes a long time to shift, something needs adjusted or oiled.
Aug
25
comment What is the narrowest tire you would use for commuting?
@r00fus: I believe they are Michelin tires of some description, though I didn't buy them for a brand specifically.
Jul
4
comment How can I adjust for uneven brake wear?
@zenbike: Ah, you're correct on the 109s -- got my bikes mixed up. (I had seen the logo before but it was on my father's bike...). Looks like I'm going to have to call the original bike shop and ask them what the hell is going on -- I bought this thing new and have not replaced those shoes. No reason they should be missing pieces.
Jul
4
comment How can I adjust for uneven brake wear?
I did completely pull off the shoes in order to replace the pads. There was no such washer assembly.
Jul
4
comment How can I adjust for uneven brake wear?
@zenbike: Hmmm, close. It is a Trek 1000. Dont quite remember the year but IIRC it is from 2007. And yes it does have a 9 cog cassette. What I don't understand is why one would need to purchase these kinds of things and why they would not come on the bike on the first place. (I believe the calipers are 105s)
Jul
4
comment How can I adjust for uneven brake wear?
Yes, I tried that before posting here. Tightening down that screw always undoes any positioning you have done to the pad (beyond moving up and down the caliper arm itself of course)
Jul
4
comment Are there any drivetrain components designed and sold to last longer?
Hmm.. I wonder where these mile counts are coming from. My previous bike was 30 years old and never had to have any of these parts replaced. Sure, the crank bearing was pretty much shot by the time I replaced the bike, but there was nothing wrong with the cassette or chain. (To be fair, it was a secondhand bike and I only rode it for the last 4 or 5 or so, but I think there was easily 2k miles on it just the time I had it...)
Jul
4
comment How can I adjust for uneven brake wear?
@zenbike: No, that's just a plain washer. It's not semi-spherical, and it's not lopsided. It's flat.
Jul
4
comment How can I adjust for uneven brake wear?
It does not move. Those washers are both flat -- tightening those bolts always aligns the brake pads the exact same way. I have seen the kind of semispherical setups both you and @Мסž are talking about, but this bike is not equipped with those. (The rear shoes don't even have a washer of any type on that side of the caliper)
Jul
4
comment How can I adjust for uneven brake wear?
There are no such semi-spherical washers....
Jul
4
awarded  Critic
Jul
4
comment What kinds of brake designs exist, and what are their general pros and cons?
Note: There's a similar picture on this question: bicycles.stackexchange.com/q/4635/1636
Jul
4
asked How can I adjust for uneven brake wear?
Jul
4
accepted How do I choose brake pads?
Jun
16
comment Is it possible to pair wheel sensors with an Android phone GPS?
It should be noted that wheel sensors aren't the most accurate things in the world. Even if you take the time to do a wheel roll-out when programming your computer, things like your wheels flexing, the compression of the tire itself as it meets the road, slippage, etc. cause accuracy problems for these things. On 50 mile rides, there has been as much as a half mile difference between me and the next guy.
Jun
16
answered Can using a trainer damage my bicycle?
Jun
16
comment Weight of disc brakes
@Stopher87: That's true -- but in this case I do think the weight is significant. According to this -> [quote] By the time you add everything in, including front and rear brakes and the added weight of the disc specific hubs, you end up with around 150 to 350 grams additional weight to the whole bike. This weight number greatly depends on the wheels, rims, hubs, and disc brake system you choose. [/quote] For some bikes, that's a significant amount of weight.
Jun
16
awarded  Scholar