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Mar
10
comment Are road brakes designed not to brake too much?
By the way, my current personal descent speed records are almost the same for MTB on dirt and for Road Bike on Pavement. ;)
Mar
10
comment Are road brakes designed not to brake too much?
Althoug common speeds are higher on road bikes, mountain bikes plus mtb gear wheights significanlty more, thus an mtb has more kinetic energy than a road one, both moving a the same speed.
Feb
20
comment Convert a Cannondale SM1000 (about 1991 model) to disk brakes
@Criggie: Sorry, I didn't read that this answer was about front brake only. I made my comment too short and didn't specify that my worries about the frame are related to the rear triangle. I Inicially thought your answer was generally against the upgrade and my comment was meant in that same direction.
Feb
18
comment Convert a Cannondale SM1000 (about 1991 model) to disk brakes
Also, a frame or fork not designed for disk brakes may not have a structure that can withstand the forces that a disk brake generates.
Nov
28
comment Why use multiple materials on chainrings?
@SimonMᶜKenzie: I meant that the rider has identified his/her shifting technique faults and has corrected them.
Oct
30
comment Is rubber cement in stationery stores the same as in tire patch kits?
When I was a kid, and my rides around the block, I once patched a tube with rubber cement and a piece cut out of another tube. It lasted for about 3 days. Also tried with rubber cement + tire patch. Lasted even less. Meanwhile, a well applied tire patch with vulcanizing compound will outlast the tube and the tire!
Oct
27
comment How much of a bruising can a MTB take?
+1. I would add that a good technique is not only smoother on the bike, but on rider's body as well. No point enduring unnecesary pain (or ptential injury) if the same trail can be ridden easier while keeping the fun.
Sep
1
comment What makes a cassette mountain bike vs. road bike?
@ChrisinAK: WOuld you say that installing a MTB cassette (paired with a long cage deraileur) on a road hub is safe compatibility-wise?
Aug
4
comment Fixing rear-wheel puncture on belt-drive bike
Indeed a flat can be fixed without taking the wheel off the bike. On a bike with chain, I prefer the non drive side. On front wheels, the non-disc side.
Jul
24
comment How to ride to work without sweating?
@Davor: No, it's not science, just practical knowledge. What you eat, particularly spice, ends up in your transpiration and contributes to body odor. In this sense even a person that just took a shower and sweats releases a smell. Drinking a lot of water just dilutes these things, (whatever they are) and makes body odor less prominent, even before bacteria reproduction.
Jul
22
comment How to commute to work on your bike and dress up
Relevant: bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/15594/…
Jul
18
comment Why did my tire fail?
Then it sounds like chemical damage. It may have contacted some solvent, oil or the like, but most rubber compound can resist common paint solvents, and motor oil
Jul
18
comment Why did my tire fail?
Was the bike being carried in a rear rack? If so, did the tire sat on the stream of the exhaust? I've seen tires ruined by the heat of the exhaust. It weakens the inner threads so the rubber is left on its own but it can't whitstand the air pressure.
Jul
17
comment What is the benefit of fat tires on pavement?
These days I'm using a fully rigid mountain bike even for XC riding (the trails need very little suspension) and the 26x2.1 tires with low pressure are enough for me. The big advantage for me is that having no suspension my bike is way lighter than some expensive single susp. bikes. I guess that the same holds true for city riding with a fully rigid fat bike if you care little for rolling resistance. After all, coping with extra weight for the sake of comfort from suspension is just another kind of sacrifice. Why not accept extra rolling resist. in exchange of comfort and lightness?
Jul
17
comment What is the benefit of fat tires on pavement?
I agree that comfort may be the only "benefit" that would make me choose a fat bike for city riding. A fat rigid bike may be lighter than a full suspension bike and provide enough cushioning for small potholes, pavement creases and the like.
Jul
14
comment What is the necessary equipment on longer bike rides?
Indeed, @dlu, I had forgotten that. Edited accordingly.
Jul
14
comment What is the necessary equipment on longer bike rides?
The first part, about tools, is actually my every ride tool set. Listed individual tools but they are actually 4 separated objects (Counting the patch kit as a unit. As for food I suit accordingly to each ride, That's why I mention liquid amount per riding hour. The Full pack is thought for a ride longer than 4 hours in which at some point I would be alone and further away than one hour walking to get help in case of bike failure not repairable with the carried tools.
Jul
1
comment 8 speed free wheel with single speed crankset
@ChrisL: I appreciate your correction. Indeed I was thinking about the new trend of replacing MTB triples with 1x drivetrais. I also agree that a 1x chainring is not required, but I stand behind my word that it really helps. In my case in DH racing a 1x DH specific ring almost completely eliminated chain drop, compared to a regular, 32 teeth ring from a triple crankset. In the end, I was trying to say to the O.P. is that he can cut time to project completion by going straight to a single ring crankset, instead of having to worry about all the different posibbilities you correctly stated.
Jun
30
comment 8 speed free wheel with single speed crankset
A chainring designed to be used in a single setup has teeth specifically designed to reduce chain droppage. Also, 42 tends to be the largest chainring with 4 holes to attach to the crank, bigger rings tend to have 5 bolt holes. So geting a new single ring crankset may be quicker than fiddling around with a cheap one.
Jun
30
comment Standing vs. high rpm for acceleration
If you are comfortable using a technique and you get good overall results, then don't change it but continue to improve it.