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Jan
28
revised Why is a steady cadence so important? Or is it?
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Jan
28
comment Why is a steady cadence so important? Or is it?
Have you read the answers to this question? bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/12518/… In any event, if you examine what riders actually do, it is natural for cadence to vary. Riders rarely ride at a fixed cadence unless the conditions are also fixed (that is, same speed, same slope, same wind, same power).
Jan
14
comment Why does hunger have a much more drastic effect in cycling than in other endurance activities?
Your last sentence is unclear. It's not clear that less trained individuals can last longer before bonking while running than they do when cycling.
Jan
14
comment Why does hunger have a much more drastic effect in cycling than in other endurance activities?
@PeteH, a partial answer to how many calories a runner will burn per hour is given half-way down in this answer.
Jan
11
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
7
comment Does gear ratio affect Power?
@ChrisH One might think so, but empirically not. Many riders can produce > 1 kW for a few seconds in a narrow range of cadence but they might climb a nontrivial hill at, say, 200 - 250 watts. Empirical analysis of their cadence choices show that at a lower level of output they can and generally do produce fixed power over a wide range of cadence and crank torque.
Jan
7
comment Does gear ratio affect Power?
Welcome to bicycles.stackexchange. Your answer applies only instantaneously. For climbs of nontrivial duration, power is limited by metabolic processes (mostly, aerobic). That is, what you've written is true for maximal instantaneous power but when climbing any nontrivial hill your power output will be decidedly submaximal. There are still boundary values on gearing that will limit power production but and long as you are reasonably far from those boundaries your limitation is metabolic, not either force-limited nor limited by the speed of msucular contractions.
Dec
25
awarded  Necromancer
Dec
25
comment Should flywheels on stationary trainers be replaced periodically to avoid catastrophic failures caused by fatigue?
The flywheel replacement from Computrainer is free. Replacing the flywheel is definitely a more economical option.
Dec
24
answered Should flywheels on stationary trainers be replaced periodically to avoid catastrophic failures caused by fatigue?
Dec
4
comment Will this power2max power meter be compatible with Cannondale Synapse?
Was this for a BB30 version of the Type S? The difference between the BB30 and the BB30A is that the "A" has 5mm of extra width on the left side BB shell. Check for clearance there.
Dec
3
comment Will this power2max power meter be compatible with Cannondale Synapse?
I presume you asked Power2Max? What did they say?
Nov
8
comment Should I be able to peel off a glued tire patch?
Regular glue contains no "vulcanizing" components. Vulcanizing occurs under high pressure and temperature (normally, around 170 deg C., or about 350 deg F). Regular patches adhere well because the adhesive is better. If actual chemical vulcanization were occurring, the adhesive and patches used for latex tubes would be different from the adhesive and patches used for butyl tubes since latex and butyl are chemically different.
Nov
2
revised What is energy output in Strava application?
added 651 characters in body
Nov
2
answered What is energy output in Strava application?
Nov
1
comment Is rubber cement in stationery stores the same as in tire patch kits?
If actual vulcanization had occurred, you would not be able to peel a patch off a tube.
Nov
1
comment Is rubber cement in stationery stores the same as in tire patch kits?
Not exactly. There often is real latex in rubber cement, and the solvent keeps it in suspension. The solvent volatilizes away leaving the adhesive and the rubber behind. You can use the same rubber cement whether your tube is butyl or latex; different formulations of rubber cement will include different amounts of rubber and different adhesives but no chemical vulcanization occurs.
Oct
31
comment Is rubber cement in stationery stores the same as in tire patch kits?
See my comment above to the other answer about vulcanization. "Rubber cement" is an adhesive that creates an airtight bond, so it's the cement that holds air in the (butyl) tube, not the patch. The patch is there to hold the cement in place around the hole and to protect the cement from abrasion. The molds used in manufacturing are sprayed with a "mold release" (think: Pam cooking spray) so you can peel the tube out of the mold. That's what you're trying to remove when you abrade the tube with sandpaper before applying glue and patch.
Oct
31
comment Is rubber cement in stationery stores the same as in tire patch kits?
Vulcanization does occur in natural rubber when exposed to sulfur and results in a cross-linked polymer but 1) most inner tubes are made of butyl, which is a synthetic rubber made from petroleum (which is why ExxonMobil is one of the major producers of butyl rubber) and isn't cured with sulfur and 2) vulcanization of natural rubber occurs under both pressure and heat. A typical vulcanization process using natural rubber and sulfur (with accelerants) is done at around 170 deg C. (~350 deg F).
Sep
18
awarded  Guru