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Apr
5
comment Headwind when riding in a loop
It's good to be skeptical but decreased drag at non-zero yaw is a fact verifiable both in wind tunnels and on the road -- the only issue is the magnitude of the effect. If you race in events where seconds (or fractions of seconds) separate placements, it certainly can be both relevant and significant; if you don't, it won't be either.
Apr
4
comment Headwind when riding in a loop
By chance, Damon Rinard (who translated the Pivit article referenced above) happened to answer a question about decreasing drag with non-zero yaw earlier today.
Apr
3
comment Headwind when riding in a loop
Effective drag can decrease with non-zero yaw (that is, the effective CdA can decrease). This has been shown not only for components like wheels and frames in wind tunnels but also for riders on complete bikes. That said, this is a small effect and it depends on the yaw angle (which depends on the loop, the rider's speed, and the the wind speed and direction) so from a practical perspective it's rarely important. I've upvoted your answer because it addresses the OP's direct question -- I was only mentioning this for completeness' sake.
Apr
3
comment Headwind when riding in a loop
This is a good and conventional answer but incomplete. The fuller answer, which may not be what the original questioner intended, depends on the the shape of the loop and how the rider's aero drag varies with yaw angle. Imagine a loop shaped like a triangle, with two outbound legs heading upwind but not straight upwind, and the inbound leg heading straight downwind. Now, add this twist: at non-zero yaw, some (but not all!) bikes/riders experience lower drag than at zero yaw. That is, they "sail." In this case, they can go faster on the loop with some wind than in a calm.
Mar
29
comment hill climb tt pacing strategy for short steep hills?
Well, first, bicycles.stackexchange prefers questions that can be answered, not just discussed; but, second, I try to know and do as little training as possible. Coaches and racers do ask me for advice and information but not about training.
Mar
29
comment hill climb tt pacing strategy for short steep hills?
A second issue is how the OP measured his power: with an on-bike power meter on hills, or indoors. Estimates of what he can sustain for X minutes can differ depending on how it was measured and the grade he tested on, especially when the anaerobic component is large.
Mar
29
comment hill climb tt pacing strategy for short steep hills?
Constant power output is time-minimizing only when the conditions are constant. If the slope varies (or the wind blows differently on different parts of the course) the time-minimizing strategy is to vary power. The optimization problem is finding a (varying) pacing strategy that gets you to the top of the hill in the shortest time while meeting constraints on energy expenditure. That's a difficult and interesting problem, particularly when the durations are so short and the work rate will be above VO2Max.
Mar
17
comment Why do some triathlon seatposts go straight up and down instead of at an angle?
Nice answer. As you no doubt know, that slowtwitch.com article was written by Dan Empfield.
Mar
16
comment Why do some triathlon seatposts go straight up and down instead of at an angle?
I view it differently, but I don't have a problem with your answer. Vertical seatposts and steep geometry are a frame response to the desire to get as far forward as possible. The UCI imposed that rule to prevent even more forward frame designs. The vertical seatposts we see today are just a point along a continuum. In a completely aero-focused world frame designs would be even more radical. There's nothing magic about vertical.
Mar
16
comment Why do some triathlon seatposts go straight up and down instead of at an angle?
Nice. You might want to add something about the 5cm setback rule -- it shows that riders would want to go even farther forward if they were allowed to.
Mar
15
comment Why do some triathlon seatposts go straight up and down instead of at an angle?
I don't have time to give a full answer to this question, but it's because TT and Tri bikes have a steeper seat angle than road bikes. This is a side-effect of aerobars, which are used on TT and Tri bikes. You can get more info from this interview with Dan Empfield, the primary inventor of the Tri-specific bike here. It would be good if you would summarize the article and submit the answer to your own question.
Mar
7
comment Any experience with shaft driven bikes?
Although you can't change the gearing from the drive itself, there are internally-geared hubs that are compatible with shaft drives.
Feb
26
comment Advantages and Disadvantages of Bar light vs headlight.
I believe this is closely related to this question: bicycles.stackexchange.com/questions/8781/…
Jan
26
comment How do I train to gain Tony Martin/Fabian Cancellara/Bradley Wiggins esq abilities to turn over a big gear 58t, 11t,?
This is an overly broad question and the answers would then also be overly broad and thus wouldn't particularly fit in the Q-and-A format. Can you narrow your question to something more specific?
Jan
23
comment Are 130 BCD chainsets stiffer than 110 BCD?
I'm slightly confused by your question. You mean for the same size chain rings, like 52-tooth or 39-tooth? Or do you mean a 34-tooth chain ring on a 110 BCD crank vs. a 39-tooth ring on a 130 BCD crank but with corresponding differences in the rear cogs so that the overall gear ratio is held constant? What is the comparison you're trying to make? (BTW, for the same power input and cadence at the crank, force on the chain ring is inversely proportional to the number of teeth on the chain ring, so a 34-tooth chain ring carries 39/34 = 1.15 ==> 15% more force than a 39-tooth ring.)
Dec
17
comment Why can't the gear ratio be something like 100:1? Is it practically possible?
fredrompelberg.com/upload/algemeen/Wereldrecord_fiets.JPG
Dec
17
comment Why can't the gear ratio be something like 100:1? Is it practically possible?
1899, at 63+ mph, by Charles "Mile-a-minute" Murphy. The current absolute speed record is held by Fred Rompelberg at 167 mph. He used a double reduction gear (70/13 connected to a 60/15 for a total gear ratio of 21.5) and his wheels were 18 inches in diameter.
Nov
19
comment How are the categories for climbs decided?
I used the official TdF website for the name of each climb, its category, length, and gradient. Given those data, it's simple to calculate the elevation contours.
Aug
21
comment Is vehicular cycling legal in France?
Nice answer. Could you add a reference to R414-2 and R414-4-IV? I believe the latter in particular is relevant to the question.
Jun
13
comment Is there a simple way to measure, record, and use wind resistance or tail winds?
Very nice. Two small correction: in part 2, air resistance varies with the square of air speed. Therefore, the power needed to overcome that air resistance approximately varies with the cube of speed (actually, (ground speed)*(air speed)^2 ). And, wind doesn't alway cancel out over the same route. Wind often has a pattern determined by geography and season, and wind speeds follow a Weibull distribution so, for example, you can end up with more extreme headwinds in the afternoon than tailwinds in the morning.