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May
7
comment Formula to calculate Single Speed Chain Length from Chainring Size, Cog Size, and Chainstay Length
And if you want a still more technical explanation: math.stackexchange.com/q/123361/27435
May
7
comment Formula to calculate Single Speed Chain Length from Chainring Size, Cog Size, and Chainstay Length
I have made a strikingly question before, although I wanted to find chainstay length while you want to find number of chain links. Should this count as a duplicate? bicycles.stackexchange.com/q/8608/2355
May
6
comment Bike type suggestion for packed limestone trails
Knobby, fat tires (2.0 and up) should do with any bike, even without front suspension.
May
5
answered When is a child ready to switch from scooting to pedaling?
May
4
comment Why are single-speed bikes with disc brakes hard to find?
@Kaz I guess for manufacturer it's way easier to get a PAIR of OEM brakes (discs, calipers, lever), than just a single one. Maybe in the future more manufacturers take advantage of the "front-only-brake-single-speed-bike", but I'm afraid this won't happen for now.
May
4
awarded  maintenance
May
2
comment Continuous Peloton
That's a whole new perspective, and there is science in it! +1
May
2
comment Continuous Peloton
Three riders would be enough if you use a Globe of Death instead of a regular track...
May
2
comment Continuous Peloton
@DanielRHicks +1 You should put it into an answer, the harmonics part is the key reason why that would not work (unless the riders work in a circus and have coreographic skills).
May
2
comment Running one wheel with clincher and one with Tubular
If I understand you right, one of the concerns is "can I run different tires on a bike?" and the answer is YES, the tires are totally independent from one another and this can even be used to "tune" the behaviour of the bike, either on an off road, according to personal preferences.
May
1
comment Is there a reason why one's calfs would ache on a Turbo or Spinner, but not when riding on the road?
@DanielRHicks well I must assume it would still be rare, since all my friends for decades have been cyclists, and there were all sorts of "go-all-the-way"-freaks among them. Never seen or heard anything even closely related to that... I guess you have to go REALLY beyond all limits to damage the muscles like that (I guess fatigue and hunger comes much faster...)
May
1
comment Is there a reason why one's calfs would ache on a Turbo or Spinner, but not when riding on the road?
@DanielRHicks interesting, I didn't know that! (indeed, googling "exercise induced compartment syndrome" returns a lot of results, most of them related to the lower limbs).
Apr
30
comment Is there a reason why one's calfs would ache on a Turbo or Spinner, but not when riding on the road?
@DanielRHicks this health issue you mention (compartment syndrome) is very serious and never happens during physiological conditions, even under extreme exercise. Severe tissue damage with large swelling is required to close the blood vessels and start necrosis: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compartment_syndrome
Apr
30
comment BMX gearing - for road / commuting
+1 Actually it's difficult to recommend some gear-ratio, besides saying "the larger the better". Unfortunately it's not even THAT easy because if you get too big a gear-ratio, it will raise other difficulties, either (going uphill, for example).
Apr
30
comment Will a bike stand that holds one wheel damage my bike?
Are you sure this is the best option to have AT HOME??
Apr
29
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
29
comment Why are single-speed bikes with disc brakes hard to find?
This subtle detail has put the Surly Troll out of my dreamlist...
Apr
29
answered Why are single-speed bikes with disc brakes hard to find?
Apr
27
comment Are single-speed bikes better equipped to handle cog/chain wear?
@Kibbee I agree that this seem to make sense, but in my experience that's not how it "actually happens", for two reasons I think: 1) it is different to ride "wrong gear" with a derailer bike, which suffers from that (it's not the intended use) and with a single-gear bike. Single-gear is DESIGNED for that, besides being beefier and always aligned (no chain crossing). Also, singles are very efficient, and you can keep the bike moving uphill even at very low cadence, without abusing neither the drivetrain nor your own legs. There are no "wrong gears" with singles.
Apr
26
comment What factors determine stem length ?
@Jahaziel also I found that the force over the wrists depends not only on torso angle, but also on hand position relative to the hips, which is the pivot point of torso rotation. The closer to the hips the handlebar is, with any given torso angle, the greater the reaction force needed to counteract the torso's-weight-generated TORQUE around the hips. So, sometimes a lower, longer reach can be more forgiving to the wrists and shoulders than an upright, cramped cockpit, specially while braking or going downhill.