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May
20
comment Fixed Gear Chainring Centering
Remind that these tight-and-loose spots may be caused by chainring, cog or the very chain being "off-center". If you spin the pedals with the bike upside down and there is not a regular pattern of tight-and-loose, perhaps even more than one part is off-center. That tends to happen more with cheap parts.
May
17
comment Good locks seem awfully heavy
At cafes, people usually keep looking at the bike, and cafes usually are in relatively safer neighborhoods, I think.
May
15
comment Does frame size inside a particular model affect the ride characteristics of the bike?
+1 for real world examples.
May
14
comment Replaced Shimano Bottom Bracket, now front derailleur won't shift to largest gear
Is the crankset the same? Some cranksets "sink deeper" in the bottom bracket, so if you have a different crankset, that might be an issue. Besides, even the same crankset sinks differently around different bottom brackets, due to spindle taper. If that is the case, do you think it's possible to tighten the bolt a bit more? That would bring the crankset closer to the front derailer.
May
10
comment Why is cycling on a road so much faster than cycling on a cycle path?
If we agree that, by design, road surfaces are constructed smoother than bike paths (which seems to describe reality worldwide), then I think this is the best answer. +1
May
10
comment Why is cycling on a road so much faster than cycling on a cycle path?
Exactely the same thing in Brazil. (by the way, isn't this answer actually a comment?)
May
10
comment Disabling back-pedal brake
@DanielRHicks I also remember old, bulky bikes being ridden over and over and over and never having a chain replaced OR a chain-skip... Something must have been lost in the way... :P
May
8
comment Disabling back-pedal brake
Is there a WIRE activating the brake? Shouldn't the very backpedalling activate the brake, without need of a wire and a lever? Confusing...
May
7
awarded  Populist
May
7
comment Is cycling better than walking to lose weight?
Never forget the possibility to use the bike BEYOND your commute, since once you get minimally fit, you could get really far and/or really fast, having the bike as an extra, "free" tool to exercise (besides being an utilitarian mean of transportation).
May
7
revised How to get back on the road again?
added 33 characters in body
May
7
comment How to get back on the road again?
Yeah, the roads I ride with these conditions have a ramp caused by new asphalt only on the main road, not the side lane. I'd say lightening the weight on each wheel going over the ramp is important, but I find a bunny hop is too critical if the traffic is that heavy as described.
May
7
answered How to get back on the road again?
May
7
comment Formula to calculate Single Speed Chain Length from Chainring Size, Cog Size, and Chainstay Length
(well, actually you have to get the radius from number of teeth, but that is "natural" too...)
May
7
comment Formula to calculate Single Speed Chain Length from Chainring Size, Cog Size, and Chainstay Length
Actuallly it's just move things to the right side of the equation, leaving "L" (chain length) isolated on one side.
May
7
comment Formula to calculate Single Speed Chain Length from Chainring Size, Cog Size, and Chainstay Length
And, just in case you want to find the "magic gear" for a vertical dropout bike, I think it's risky, since minor variations on the parts themselves can make the chain become too tight or too slacky... Not to mention the ideal length will quickly vanish as the chain wears out. (well, just a thought)
May
7
comment Formula to calculate Single Speed Chain Length from Chainring Size, Cog Size, and Chainstay Length
And if you want a still more technical explanation: math.stackexchange.com/q/123361/27435
May
7
comment Formula to calculate Single Speed Chain Length from Chainring Size, Cog Size, and Chainstay Length
I have made a strikingly question before, although I wanted to find chainstay length while you want to find number of chain links. Should this count as a duplicate? bicycles.stackexchange.com/q/8608/2355
May
6
comment Bike type suggestion for packed limestone trails
Knobby, fat tires (2.0 and up) should do with any bike, even without front suspension.
May
5
answered When is a child ready to switch from scooting to pedaling?