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Jan
19
comment is it worth to change slx 2011 rear derailleur for xtr 2009?
I don't think I can give an absolute opinion since I don't know SLX models, but XTR would be great even if it was a '96 model! I happen to have a very old XTR crankset, and it seems like it's going to last forever! And AFAIK, 2009 was a very very nice year for XTR derailleurs.
Jan
19
answered What to do if you are about to get doored?
Jan
19
answered is it worth to change slx 2011 rear derailleur for xtr 2009?
Jan
19
comment Equipping a commuter bike
@WayneJohnston in summer I sometimes use "swim-suit": dry-fit t-shirt, and synthetic-fabric shorts (above-knee). Pedal in the rain, soaked, and that's it. Then change when arriving on destination. It's way less worry with getting wet.
Jan
19
comment Equipping a commuter bike
Fenders, fenders, full-fenders, high-quality-full-fenders-with-mud-flap! And a bell! And a helmet mirror! And that's it! ;o)
Jan
19
comment Why is carbon fiber inherently weak? Or is it?
Excelent answer!
Jan
19
comment Why don't frame manufacturers ream/face their frames?
Agree, and add one thing: the frames should be perfectly raced "just in time", because they can suffer some impact during transport or handling. I, for one, never raced any frame, but I think this is a good idea to do that (I didn't even knew it was possible until recently).
Jan
18
comment Help a new biker with bad fitness to become a bike commuter
Zippers are also great for shells, so it is possible to use zipper opening as a thermostat/"windostat".
Jan
18
comment Help a new biker with bad fitness to become a bike commuter
2 to 3 miles would be a good first-day distance, no hurry (in a park would be ideal), and also you should stop from time to time and correct position of saddle and handlebars, if needed.
Jan
18
answered Flickering light, Lumotec IQ Fly Senso Plus with SON hub-generator
Jan
18
comment What is the common “vocabulary” for the captain and stoker to communicate?
@nick3216 well said +1
Jan
17
comment Fat or Skinny Tires for Winter Riding?
I think the hypothetical "sink down" effect of skinny tires usually is ovewhelmed by their sensitivity to being caught in ruts and get pinch-flatted from hidden obstacles in the snow.
Jan
17
answered Fat or Skinny Tires for Winter Riding?
Jan
17
comment Suggestions for budget mountain bike with opportunities for upgrade
+1 every word is excellent advice.
Jan
16
answered Suggestions for budget mountain bike with opportunities for upgrade
Jan
16
comment What is the longest reasonable distance one may expect to ride on a comfort bike?
I agree you should get the most of your bike before considering to change it for another. You can reposition yourself, use narrower tires, swap some minor components... I like to ride comfort bikes and they can be efficient if you set up a more "sporty" cockpit. +1
Jan
16
comment What is the longest reasonable distance one may expect to ride on a comfort bike?
With this bike you can ride 14 hours in a single day, or go perhaps ride 200km in a single day (seriously!), without the risk of anyone reasonably question if the bike is appropriate or not. For the distance you pointed, no problem AT ALL, even ten times that. It depends only on fitness, nice road, and nice mood. But you have to grow this distance small steps each time, depending mostly on your age. Go for it!!
Jan
16
comment Why are axle cone nuts on the left side of a bike not reverse threaded?
+1 agreed. The situation described by OP, in my experience, is quite rare, so perhaps this self-tightening effect happened by other cause. Also, in pedals and bottombrackets, the direction of resultant force rotates while the bike is in use (your weight points down, but the pedal rotates) but in the hub the resultant force always point in one direction against the axle, because neither the axle or the cone rotate (it is the hub that does so).
Jan
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
14
comment Load your bag or Load your bike?
I think it depends. From personal experience, after you learn to use your arms and legs as suspension on really irregular terrain, it is WAY easier and safer to control the bike. It does not mean it won't make you tired if you do it too long. Anyway, lotsa loads AND rough terrain will always make you tired and might be preferrably avoided (but not always, like remote-areas trekking, for example). I for one, would only go fast downhill, offroad, with a backpack (and not with panniers over a rack).