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  • 9 votes cast
Oct
27
awarded  Curious
Oct
27
comment SRAM Force 22 chainset in an otherwise 10-speed SRAM setup
@ebrohman: Yes, precisely. Actually I have been using SRAM Rival cranks. And my drive-side crank just went out of commision becuse of a seized pedal. I thought about upgrading to Force, but apparently I'll just get another Rival. These still seem to be available in 10-speed flavor.
Oct
27
comment SRAM Force 22 chainset in an otherwise 10-speed SRAM setup
The first question at the link seems to be about: a) using 10-speed chainset on an 11-speed bicycle, b) using 10-speed cranks(spider) with 11-speed chainrings on an 11-speed bicycle. I.e. it is all about 11-speed bicycles. My question is about 10-speed bicycle. The answer does mention though that 11-speed chainsets work on 10-speed bicycles.
Oct
26
asked SRAM Force 22 chainset in an otherwise 10-speed SRAM setup
Oct
14
awarded  Yearling
Jun
26
comment Best ways to avoid getting hit by cars?
"...hug the outside edge ..., then fade toward the edge". Er... so, the former "edge" is apparently "outside edge". What is the latter "edge" then? What is the difference between "outside edge" and "edge"?
Jun
12
comment How to turn off segments on edge 510
@andy256: No, there's no need to follow a course or do a workout. If you have a segment uploaded to the device, the segment will trigger this "segment mode" display every time you ride through it. Another annoying issue with this functionality is that the "segment mode" screen will also pop up when you ride through that segment in reverse direction.
Feb
24
awarded  Critic
Feb
23
comment What is the proper etiquette for overtaking a horse?
@chimp: Exactly. Most of us know that quietly overtaking a person with a dog on a MUP might easily result in the dog getting startled when it finally notices you. The same thing applies to a horse. You need to announce your approach with some sort of sound. Don't make any explosive noises, but also don't be "as quiet as possible". Be heard before you are seen.
Feb
23
comment Adding front derailleur vs upgrading the rear one on a (ladies) bicycle
A bash guard of "cover" type might provide some protection for clothing, but I highly doubt that. Bash guards are not designed for that. I'm pretty sure the clothing will get stuck in the chain even with a bash guard.
Feb
23
comment Adding front derailleur vs upgrading the rear one on a (ladies) bicycle
What you linked are bash guards. These rings are intended as either a replacement or a cover for a large chainring on a mountain bicycle. Their purpose is to serve as a pivot/impact point located between the wheels when riding over highly uneven terrain. A regular chainring would get destroyed by such impacts, which is why people remove the large chainring and install a bash guard instead. Bash guards have absolutely nothing to do with protecting clothing from getting stuck in the chain. Again, most bash guards actually replace the large chainring, but some are designed as covers.
Feb
23
comment Adding front derailleur vs upgrading the rear one on a (ladies) bicycle
Your link leads to bashguards. I don't see how a bashguard is even remotely relevant here. The OP needs a chainguard on a relaxed bicycle.
Oct
8
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
23
comment Is it normal for the chain to slip in an 'extreme' gear?
As for "authoritatively discarding" something... Imagine someone stopping by a car mechanic and telling him "I always filled up at Chevron and my car worked fine. But yesterday I decided to try Shell and now my radio is dead. Why did Shell kill my radio?" I hope you understand that the mechanic can "authoritatively discard" Shell gasoline as a factor in this case, even if it is "not his question".
Sep
23
comment Is it normal for the chain to slip in an 'extreme' gear?
@Blam: But it is my answer. Moreover, what is specific to problems that might pop up in small-to-small configuration (including the matter of slip) is addressed in the second and third paragraph of my answer. The rest of my answer addresses misguided comments about crosschaining in general. I think I made it pretty clear by the introductory sentence.
Sep
23
comment Is it normal for the chain to slip in an 'extreme' gear?
@Blam: No, no, no. One more time: without any small-to-small specific mechanical interference, the question is not about small-to-small. It is my answer. Claiming that under such circumstances it is about small-to-small is no different than claiming that it is about red bikes. So I hereby authoritatively discard any small-to-small specifics from this question as nonsensical. Does it make it clearer?
Sep
23
comment Is it normal for the chain to slip in an 'extreme' gear?
@Blam: The question is about a specific degree of crosschaining. It is not really about small-to-small specifically as it is not about red-colored bicycles. There's no fundamental difference in crosschain-induced wear in either case, barring mechanical interference I mentioned above. Moreover, other factors being equal, big-to-big produces more stress in the chain than small-to-small. The only reason trim feature is targeted at big-to-big config is that 1) it is more useful, 2) it is difficult to implement both in mechanical setup. Electronic shifters can trim in both directions.
Sep
23
comment Gearing on drivetrains
Long steep hills a problem? In which direction? Uphill or downhill?
Sep
21
comment Is it normal for the chain to slip in an 'extreme' gear?
Well, after stating the obvious for the third time I can do only one thing left to do: issue a troll alert. So here goes: Troll alert!!!
Sep
21
comment Is it normal for the chain to slip in an 'extreme' gear?
Finally, you continue to conveniently ignore the argument that I already presented: FD manufacturers providing direct support for crosschaining. That alone allows me to reiterate what I stated above and close this debate. I did all I could. Anyone who still doesn't get it will heave to seek alternative educational opportunities.